Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
indexphinger

How to make vodka?

16 posts in this topic

I'd like to make a few bottles of vodka for me, my mom and my dad. I rly like a smooth vodka and I'd like to make some nice flavored ones with oranges and stuff too.

Any good tutorials? I have room in my closet for a micro-stillery :P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why's everyone suddenly so interested in making alcohol?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why's everyone suddenly so interested in making alcohol?

I came here to post that same thing but you beat me to it. :P

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Check out

http://homedistiller.org/designs.htm

http://www.moonshine-still.com/still.pdf <---good guide to build a still

Also the book Alaskan bootleggers bible has lots of instructions on it. I found a copy at the local barnes and noble.

be safe as this is very illegal in the US and alcohol vapors can catch fire/explode.

Note: I'm in canada lol :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure distilling ethanol is illegal there, too.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why's everyone suddenly so interested in making alcohol?

hobby with benefits. although i'll admit i'm not prepared to dedicate the time and effort to learning how to brew my own booze right now, it's interesting. plus i don't think i can yet trust myself with chemistry enough to drink a concoction I brew on my own. i'd rather go to a friend's house or pick up some liquor at the store.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brewing beer is pretty harmless but when you get into distilling, that's a different ballgame.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why's everyone suddenly so interested in making alcohol?

It is a recession after all. Minus the pinstriped suits and tommy guns.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Colone Panic, you are the alcohol expert.

That is all I have to say

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For myself I am just an average drinker :D

I would NEVER drink booze distilled in home made set ups. It's very dangerous. As mentioned before it contains 'higher alcohols' which are really dangerous, potentially lethal in fact.

I am born in a little village with many small distilleries. They were usually owned by richer families because they were quite an expensive machine.

They looked very cool, rather complex and big 100% copper machines inside really old houses.

After the production of the wine, like one or two weeks after, the wine producers would book time on a distillery to make their aguardente (a distilled drink made out of squeezed grapes). Distilleries would work 24 hours a day for a week or two. Because they needed a lot of wood to be burn in order to work, they couldn't afford to stop for the night.

I've never forgot the smell when entering or passing by a distillery. It smelled really good, it smelled like sweet and smooth. Unfortunately, in the 90s, European Union, in an effort to protect other drinks like whiskey and vodka, imposed unrealistic taxes to aguardente production. Taxes as high as 2.5 euro/litter and a restriction of 10 litter maximum storage without special license.

Because of these laws, I haven't seen a distillery working in years :(

I know people that owns distilleries, I can take a few pictures maybe. However, that will take a while since I'm currently living in another country.

For the record, these are fractional column based distilleries.

Though I'm not a big aguardente drinker, I can tell you with certainty: These are tested machines developed for drink manufacture. They were reliable and trusty.

Do not drink booze unless you 100% trust its source.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aguardente is kind of like brandy or Italian grappa, then? I've never tried it. Is it any good?

I have a friend of Bulgarian descent, and some of her family members make wine. They usually save the grape skins after pressing, then soak them with water, ferment them and distill the resulting liquid into a very strong, coarse liquor.

I forget the Bulgarian name for that stuff. My friend just calls it "Bulgarian crunk juice". I tried a shot of it once and it was some real hard firewater. Definitely illegal homemade booze, but her family has been making it for generations and they know what the hell they're doing. It wasn't totally undrinkable, but certainly not the kind of thing I'd ever consume on a regular basis.

Edited by Colonel Panic
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aguardente is kind of like brandy or Italian grappa, then? I've never tried it. Is it any good?

I have a friend of Bulgarian descent, and some of her family members make wine. They usually save the grape skins after pressing, then soak them with water, ferment them and distill the resulting liquid into a very strong, coarse liquor.

I forget the Bulgarian name for that stuff. My friend just calls it "Bulgarian crunk juice". I tried a shot of it once and it was some real hard firewater. Definitely illegal homemade booze, but her family has been making it for generations and they know what the hell they're doing. It wasn't totally undrinkable, but certainly not the kind of thing I'd ever consume on a regular basis.

Yep, that's exactly what it is. And it's indeed tasty. Of course, if you want to drink a lot of it it quickly becomes unpleasant due to being rather strong.

The word 'aguardente' means "burning water". It can be very strong, it's sometimes nicknamed 'mule kick' or 'bugs killer'. I like it when its less than 50%, above that it's too strong for my taste.

I like it in very little amounts, sometimes mixed with expresso or deserts.

If you want to try it I suggest this one:

http://www.cavesaodomingos.com/english/ind...&Itemid=116

I believe it's sold internationally. If you prefer you can buy it aged in oak barrels. It's more expensive of course. Personally I am not so much into that, but that's just me.

This is what's more common in my region, in other places they make aguardente out of other fruits, or for example in brazil, they make it out of sugar cane. BTW, 'cacha├ža' is just another word for 'aguardente'.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aguardiente

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't the Russians start out by just burying potatoes underground or something??

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0