darkr

Beginning...

22 posts in this topic

Im sure you get this posted a lot, but here we go.

I am looking for good advice on how to start down the road of hacking.

I also want to start learning to to program, but I must admit, that I am lost when it comes to stuff like this. So here are my questions on both subjects:

Any books I should pick up and read?

Which programming language should I learn first?

If so, should I take programming in college and which "in general programming" classes would be best for starters?

Are there any online help guides/tutorials(I have googled, but sometimes they are hard to find ones that are even somewhat trustworthy I have found)?

Any other suggestions would be grand. My basic knowledge ranges from having a computer for about 8 years, I made two really crappy websites(very basic HTML), and I like to play around and try to find things on other peoples computers and mine to get a basic knowledge of things...

any help would be appreciated.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any books I should pick up and read?

I dont have any specifics.

read anything you can which is related to the subject you want to know about,

Which programming language should I learn first?

python is a good scripting language for beginners.


http://www.python.org/topics/learn/non-prog.html

C is a good general purpose language.


http://dmoz.org/Computers/Programming/Languages/C/Tutorials/

Java is a good Object Oriented language to learn.


http://dmoz.org/Computers/Programming/Languages/Java/FAQs,_Help,_and_Tutorials/Tutorials/

I would say save your money and just learn from online unless you just like buying books.

If so, should I take programming in college and which "in general programming" classes would be best for starters

If you are in college now and have an open slot in your schedule sure take a class you will learn from it, but a formal class is not required.

try C for starters in my opinion, but I can be wrong.

Also recommened installing linux and gnu C compiler or gcc (all freely available).

for the web skills here are some free classes.


http://www.w3schools.com/

one of the best ways to learn is to try and design a project.

you will learn from your mistakes and the next project will be larger/better.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

collegel level programming classes will usually give you a great foundation to build upon. Take one if you can and then add to it on your own.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:huh: im not really sure what to tell you but if you get into a cumminty and become active and open minded you can learn many things fast... and basically most of it comes to you ... ive been on the net ever since AOL 6.0 and been surfing ever since... basically just expierence and building up mentality... so any thing that interested search it up read up and build a database of knowledge... i really dunt suggest you go and by some books cuase some have good info but there not going to intialy teach you how to hack i do suggest u buy 2600 and BR Mag too.. basically just get involved and dont be a dick and ask questions and such and u should be on your way... :blink:
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Play with everything you can get your hands on. Play with coding languages, play with hardware, play with the internet, play with telephones, play with whatever keeps your interest. Explore it. Take it apart. Break it and try to fix it again. Fix it and try to break it again.

The longer you tinker, the more you'll keep challenging yourself. The more you challenge, the more you'll learn. The more you'll learn, the more you'll want to tinker. It's a cycle.

If you want books, drop me some mail and I'll hook you up. I've got a pretty extensive library. Give me a general topic and I'll give you "my precious" little gems of e-book goodness.

Don't burn yourself out, don't listen to anyone you'd broadly categorize as an elitist, and HAVE FUN!

-sp00f.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any books I should pick up and read?

I dont have any specifics.

read anything you can which is related to the subject you want to know about,

Which programming language should I learn first?

python is a good scripting language for beginners.


http://www.python.org/topics/learn/non-prog.html

C is a good general purpose language.


http://dmoz.org/Computers/Programming/Languages/C/Tutorials/

Java is a good Object Oriented language to learn.


http://dmoz.org/Computers/Programming/Languages/Java/FAQs,_Help,_and_Tutorials/Tutorials/

Java runs slowly and teaches bad programming habits. If you want to get into C/C++ development - And trust me you do - then stay away from it.

Python is the same way. It's slower then other scripting languages and less useful on the whole. Try Perl instead. It's more common then python or ruby and has more power. Check out http://www.perlmonks.org for help with it.

Also check out C/C++ when you can after learning some php ( http://www.php.net ). You will find php a great way to create websites and possibly pick up some extra cash while learning the c/c++ compatible syntax it uses. That will also help you become a better programmer in all 3 languages at once.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all.

Ill look up the suggestions you list. I will have an open elective next semester so Ill look into programming C/C++ and just build my own foundation from there.

Also, I really dont buy books per se :devil: but as I was browing through the bookstore today I came upon "Steal This Computer Book 2", is this any good?

Thanks for your help though :)

to sp00f, Im getting a new laptop in a few months(a small self birthday present to myself), and all i want to do is learn about basic programming, stuff that I can build upon. I want to learn as much as possible is these months so I feel I have almost total control over my laptop, or at least a really good control over it. So anything to that extent(C/C++) would be good. Anything that just has the basics, even if it doesnt tell me how to do anything, about general hacking/cracking. Information is was I need I guess.

I have browsed through a couple of 2600's and I will buy the ones I see soon(can you get them online also?) and Ill check out the BR's too.

Thanks :)

Edited by darkr
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, I really dont buy books per se  but as I was browing through the bookstore today I came upon "Steal This Computer Book 2", is this any good? 

Volume 1 and 2 are/were used for $1 on amazon.com.

thought about picking them up myself at this price - but did not.

Volume 3 was also out there.

I also was thinking of getting The Microsoft Files for $1 just for fun after seeing it referenced somewhere online. Story about business practices of this company published in 1998.

Sometimes I can find good books in the thrift stores for .50 or so.

(In fact there is a used bookseller here who regulary buys titles there for resale)

I have browsed through a couple of 2600's and I will buy the ones I see soon(can you get them online also?) and Ill check out the BR's too.

You can subscribe and also buy some backissues of 2600 online I think.

check http://www.2600.com

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bottom lines:

C with inline asm is the best language ever. EVER!

Perl is the superior scripting language (well, for portability, sed and awk are powerful posix scripting languages)

I'm currently doing reverse engineering of software protection. It's pretty fun. Look up in google "fravia reverse engineering" or under the fravia section at www.hackpalace.com under extra documents there is a document, cracking-for-dummies.html; which will sway you through the beginnings.

I'll have some basic electronic guides on my site soon (meaning: whenever I get off my ass). Being handy with a soldering iron isn't only useful, it can save you quite a bit of pennies.

About the laptop: save the trouble and get yourself something like a cheap sparc station, or some old parts to build a pentium I. I haven't had great things to say about laptops in my six year career as an (almost) compia certified A+ computer technician.

And thats all I've got to add.

For Dummies books are your friends. Really.

So are 80s books about obscure stuff.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check into getting Hugo Cornwall's Hackers Handbook.. not only will you learn nifty things from it.. but people will see your book with an accoustic coupler on the cover and think you are the l33test thing since Ham in a Can.

Otherwise, check your mail.

-spoof.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok. Thanks for your help everyone, and thanks for the email sp00f. Now I have a couple of questions real quick.

GMail: I just got invited from a friend and it seems a much more powerful website based email than others I have used. I dont know what my question is, but is this a good account to have?, or should I just stick with the 5 other different email accounts I currently use?

BUYING A LAPTOP: Right now I have a real crummy gateway from a couple years ago. And even though this serves my general purpose of school work etc etc... So, I was looking here and figured that it would be nice to treat myself to something around the lines of what they build. It seems good, I wouldnt have to upgrade for a while. Your thoughts? Im just tired of using my computer for just playing video games I guess.

If someone wants to know my specs on the desktop I have now, just ask and Ill send you a message with them. Im not opposed to upgrading this one, but it would be rather nice mobility-wise and school-wise to get a laptop.

Edited by darkr
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you got an invite take it - and then use gmailfs and you have an extra gig.

(http://richard.jones.name/google-hacks/gmail-filesystem/gmail-filesystem.html)

Oh yeah, and make sure you have projects in the language you're learning/using, because without actually doing something useful you'll (well I did) get bored and switch to a different one, for which me caused me to know a little about a lot of languages....

and don't burn yourself out, take information in slowly while doing other things in life, instead of reading every text file you can.

Edited by Against Me!
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took the invite but GMailFS seems to confusing for me right now. Ive been looking at Linux sights and sometimes I just get lost. So Ill take GMail for now and then Ill slowly learn Linux and see what GmailFS does.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel like an idiot(haha im flaming myself) :pissed:

Ive gone to some to the C websites you guys gave me. And I know this is newbish, but hey I am a newbie, there is this tutorial im looking at that tells you have to run a simple program:

#include <stdio.h>

main()

{

printf("This is a C program\n");

}

it tells you what everything is etc etc.... now how do i run it? i mean, i know if you create a .bat file and do some dos commands you can run stuff. but is there a C++ software package Im not aware of? Does it only work on Linux and should I get Linux?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow it kinda helps if I dont run to you guys for help and instead just search it for myself. I guess I need to compiler to turn the code into an executable? Which one would be best.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloodshed Dev C++ - great compiler, free. I have Turbo++ if you want it, but it's on it's way to being obsolete. Borland makes some great compilers too, but they're pricey and really dont have all that much more functionality compared to bloodshed unless you know how to use everything. I'd say for learning, use Bloodshed.

You can also use a cout statement instead of printf:

void main()

{

cout << "This is a C++ program";

system("pause");

//This is a one-line comment

/* This is

a block

comment */

}

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best advice i can think of is to never decide WHAT to learn. Just learn. If you ever find yourself admitting "i don't know" then take a note of it and spend at least a couple minutes on that topic. This is one of the reasons many hackers carry a notebook. If you don't ever accept ignorance without some effort to educate yourself, you will accumulate more knowledge than if you focus on a few things.

That doesn't mean that you can't spend more time on specific things, just that you should never be happy with "I don't know", even if you don't particularly have reason to care. Social Engineers are expecially adept at this line of thinking. Always ask how and why.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
and should I get Linux?

Yes, using linux makes all the tools you will ever need freely available, and it's a great thing to learn in general.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once you have linux you can get a huge list of free dev tools like GCC.

Check out 'man gcc' for instructions on how to compile. And remember to never use code you don't understand. EVER.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bovinefeces

I totally agree with you.. i use to be new to every thing... EVERY THING... until i started to consume more and more knownlege not just about HACKING in general but how the internet works and what it does.. and then it lead into phreaking and i started to consume it and asked qeustion when i didnt understand some thing.. back then i use to be very ignorant.. if i didnt know what some thing was i didnt qeustioned i would just let it be .. which in a way could be good cuz i never use to boggle my brain but was a bad habit and now a days if i want to know some thing i know the qeustions to asked and where to look.. which i geuss is a good habit to learn and have in life too.. :blush: its very touching.. :grr:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually recommend C++ because most colleges consider that their main programming course. If you go to school with a previous knowledge of the language, you're one step ahead of the game.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now