masakari098

Removing Hard Drive magnets

38 posts in this topic

Either way, it would be interesting to know the exact chemical compounds used.. either that or I am too much of a geek.

I am a geek too, so here's some info on 3M scotch weld dp-460 EG, which is the 3m recommended adhesive for bonding hard drive internals.

2 Composition/Information on Ingredients

4,7,10-TRIOXATRIDECANE-1,13-DIAMINE(40 - 70 percent)

4,4'-ISOPROPYLIDENE PHENOL (10 - 30 percent)

EPICHLOROHYDRIN POLYMER

MODIFIED DIGLYCIDYL ETHER OF BISPHENOL A (7-13 percent)

AMORPHOUS SILICA (3 - 7 percent)

2,4,6-TRIS((DIMETHYLAMINO)METHYL)PHENOL (1-5 percent)

NOTE:

MODIFIED DIGLYCIDYL ETHER OF BISPHENOL A is a Trade Secret.

That's a lot of shiite that i can neither pronounce or comprehend.

Here's a PDF on Scotch Weld

That's from 99, so I'd imagine that the stuff they use today is similar.

I'm waiting for a call back from the sales rep on an appropriate solvent.

Edit: He called back and said it was basically permanent, and needs to be grinded off of the piece to remove it. Sounds like a challenge.

Edited by l0cache
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But friction creates heat, and heat harms the magnets.

The main problem I am getting from this is some of the chemicals used can be fatal to the wrong person if touched; And since its a interesting mix you never know what your suffering from.

I think we should focus on the main components of the solution; for example the tri-oxa-tri-decane, dia-mine; That is a large percent of the solution right there, since diamine is a aliphatic polymer it sounds to me like the easiest way to deal with it would be to dry it out chemically without using heat that would harm the magnets.

In fact a number of the ingredients I hear involved like water.. so why not just dry it out and let it return to its original powdered state?

I am not exactly sure, but it seems to me this would be the most plausible solution, we just need the method of doing so.

Ideas anyone?

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Does not freezing a magnet have the opposite effect it would have on it if you heated it, at least for a temporary amount of time?

Either way, it would be interesting to know the exact chemical compounds used.. either that or I am too much of a geek.

no. freezing a magnet wont make it stronger to the best of my knowledge. the reason heat (and it has to be pretty extreme heat) hurts magnets is because when the magnet gets heated, the metal gets soft and looses its "magnetic memory". when it becomes hot, it becomes de-magnitized, and as it cools, it aligns with any present magnetic fields, including the earth's magnetic field.

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I must have been thinking about batteries, lol.

As noted above a strong acid would do the trick, but I have to wonder about any possible damage to the metal itself, not to mention the by-products of the acid wash could be worse then the acid itself under the right (wrong) conditions.

Does anyone know of a good publicly available drying agent (lye maybe?) it would have to be non toxic if possible.

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Drying out epoxy will not cause it to return to its origional form, it has undergone a chemical change. You mention lye, which, while it wouldn't help by drying out the gule, may work. If the thing that the magnet is stuck to is aluminum, and in my experience a lot of a HD is made of aluminum, lye may be able to dissolve it. Lye is sold as a drain cleaner, Drain-O is mostly Lye, and Red Devil Lye is pure lye, I use it for making lye soap in my home, but you have to go the the right place to order it. You would have to mix it with water. Some other drain cleaners are mostly sulferic acid, you may try those as well.

When using lye, wear gloves and eye protection, I am not kidding. It _will_ make you go blind if you get it in your eye. If you're trying to desolve somthing in it, I wouldn't breathe the fumes either.

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Now that I think about it I have also used somthing called 'ferric acid' to desolve aluminum, but I can't remember if it is ferric nitrate or ferric cloride. Whatever it is, it is pretty non-toxic. You can buy it at RatShack, it's used for etching circutboards.

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ferric acid can also be purchased from arts supply and craft stores, it is used to etch glass. i would go for the lye, it is extremely basic and if the glue is organic, it will get eaten up pretty quickly.

a note on safety. remember in fight club when tyler durton kisses what's his name's hand and pours lye on it to create a chemical burn... lye isn't really that dangerous, unless your skin is moist. incidental contact with dry skin will only result in irritation. wet skin will burn, just as if you poured acid on it. and in the movie he poured vinegar on it to nuetralize the lye, acetic acid is very weak so a lot of it would be needed, so if things go bad, that's what you need to do.

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When using lye, wear gloves and eye protection, I am not kidding. It _will_ make you go blind if you get it in your eye.

Heh, Then it seems to me I really have nothing to worry about since that would not a problem for me.. :P

Another thing I was wondering about would be the safe container to use for this, after all you do not want to use a metal tub if your poring in acid to devolve metal, granted latex chemical gloves would protect your hands, but what about your floor and the people living under you in your apartment complex?

That IS something to think about, nobody I know likes the thought of there celine (sp) dissolving and a large tub of acid falling on there head.

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I looked at the compostion, and saw (i think) that it contained quite a lot of organic material. Couldn't you theoretically use a base that desolves it. Then you wouldn't have to use acid that eats away your bathtub. (but watch your hands)

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An optimal epoxy remover would be an Aromatic Hydrocarbon such as phenol,

"Causes severe irritation of upper respiratory tract with coughing, burns, breathing difficulty, and possible coma. May be fatal if exposed to high concentrations. May also cause pallor, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, darkened urine, headache, sweating, convulsions, cyanosis (bluish skin due to deficient oxygenation of the blood), unconsciousness, fatigue, pulmonary edema & coma." (high concentrations being 5 ppm/cubic meter)

or diethylbenzene:

"headache, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, weakness, loss of coordination, blurred "vision, drowsiness, confusion, or disorientation. At extreme exposures, central nervous system effects may include respiratory depression, tremors or convulsions, loss of consciousness, coma or death."

That and a few others that cause massive reproductive damage. (like toluene)

I'd say stick with the oven.

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If you plan to use lye, any plastic, ceramic, glass, or iron conainer should be fine. You'll probably need to use somthing to mix the lye into the water, as it tends to clump up. Do not use a metal spoon--most are stainless steel, which may contain things that would react. I use a disposable Chineese takeout chopstick. Don't use one that you plan to use for food again. Also, be aware that lye gets quite hot when mixed with water and can boil. Start out with cold water, and make sure you use a container that can handle heat.

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