masakari098

Removing Hard Drive magnets

38 posts in this topic

I took apart a bunch of old hard drives for their magnets for a project i'm working on. problem is, they are glued (epoxy, i think) to the mounting bracket for the read head. does anyone know how to get the glue off? i'm thinking of bathing them in acetone, but i'm up for any bright ideas

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to do this you must construct one of the wold's largest electromagnets. you need 12 miles of 30 guage wire, and a 530lb iron rod 8" in diameter. you will also need at least 40kw of electricity, which you can only get from an industrial power connection(most homes don't give 30)

but seriously, i have no idea, i can only direct you to the short list of solvents

1 Water

2 Rubbing Alcohol

3 Gasoline

4 Turpentine

5 Acetone

6 MethylEthylKetone

7 Formaldehyde

if one of those can't get rid of it, you need to use an acid

i have never tried to take the bracket off, damn thing would be impossible to take off a piece of steel without it.

Edited by replax

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yeah dude they are impressive.... if i put one on each side of my hand it'd have enough magnitization through my hand to stay there...

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i used to have some magnets that came off of the alternator of a power-generation wind turbine, and those where uber-strong. The hard drive magnets are possibly the best at practical disposal.

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This seems like a interesting project; Does anyone know what the bonding agent is made of? It seems to me if we knew that it would be much easyer to deal with it.

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i don't know

if i had to guess i would say it's a resin glue, i don't think it's an epoxy, if it is an epoxy it would have to be a real soupy runny mix, it doesn't build up a miniscus at the edge of the magnet. but seriously, if you ever got it near somehting iron,it would be damn near impossible to take off. what are you buliding that you need magnets like that for? trying to undo the chainlock on someone's door?

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lol....nothing like that. i'm actually trying out a design for a homemade generator i found on the net. i need the magnets separated from their brackets because they are going to be mounted to what amounts to a timing wheel. one website suggested i freexe the magnets. i put them in my freezer, but i dont think that's cold enough. i'm going to find a can of compressed air and see if that does the trick. also, i found a place that said methylene chloride can dissolve it, however, it also said it's sort of hard to come by, because it's a carcinogen. the most direct and proven way, baking, isnt even open to me because the heat would neutralize the magnets. i do know that two sets of the magnets came off rather easily because the glue was brittle. that looked alot like epoxy to me. anyone's guess what they used on the other ones

Edited by masakari098

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if it is epoxy, there's a name brand of stuff called "attack", may be able to find it at home depot. it sometimes takes a while but it is an epoxy solvent.

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A while back (years ago) I designed a generator of my own, my problem was I did not have powerful enough magnetic field generated to keep the alignment of the force acting on its core assembly; Does anyone know the EM field rating on these magnets?

It would be interesting if you could get them bigger as well.. and possibly shaped.

Either way, it would be interesting to find out the chemical components of the glue keeping the magnet in its place; A little rouge chemistry may even allow us a easy way to get them from old hard drives.

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look into neodynium rare earth magnets, you can get them in shapes and they are just about the strongest magnets you can get. not really that expensive either

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the definition of an acid is something that releases hydrogen gas when it reacts with a metal

putting metal magnets in an acid is not a good idea, depending on the molarity. but it will eat the metal away.

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the definition of an acid is something that releases hydrogen gas when it reacts with a metal

putting metal magnets in an acid is not a good idea, depending on the molarity. but it will eat the metal away.

Exactly my point, knowing the exact chemical compounds could allow us to hack something up to allow us to target the adhesive directly rather then to resort to brute force.

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yes, if we know what it was it would be so much easier. i say leave it in gasoline for a week, there are so many complex organic compounds in there that it'll eat through anything organic.

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My friend put his hdd in muratic acid for like a week, it ate off the case, the discs and magnets and shit were still there for a while

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I had one of the largest collections of those once, then I left it in arizona. Sigh.

yeah, I just pried them off with a screwdriver and some elbo-grease.

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couldn't you call up the manufacturer and SE them into telling you, what glue that is and who makes this kind of glue.

(like asking if its save or making something else up)

then once you get the info, call up the glue manufacturer and say u glued ur hand to ur balls and need a solvant :P

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couldn't you call up the manufacturer and SE them into telling you, what glue that is and who makes this kind of glue.

(like asking if its save or making something else up)

then once you get the info, call up the glue manufacturer and say u glued ur hand to ur balls and need a solvant :P

Or better yet, that you have the magnet stuck to another magnet around your ball sack and need the glue type so you can call the supplier;' As long as you dont get a women on the phone you should be able to get enough pitty from the guy on the other end for them to tell you.

Nice idea, and crazy enough to work.

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epoxy becomes brittle at low temperatures. putting my magnets in the freezer for half a day allowed me to get the weaker ones off, but the shiny, thin magnets are being alittle tougher. i'm getting dry ice tommorow to try and freeze it enough to snap them loose. also, I put one magnet in the oven at 500 deg. F for 10 minutes, and that softened the epoxy enough to slide the magnet off. it's a bad method though, cause the magnet was about 1/10 the strength afterwards.

/you win again, physics!

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Does not freezing a magnet have the opposite effect it would have on it if you heated it, at least for a temporary amount of time?

Either way, it would be interesting to know the exact chemical compounds used.. either that or I am too much of a geek.

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