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raven

dual boot

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i have just recieved my linux from my father, so happy i am, well any way, i w3ant to keep windows on my drive because some things are just easier to do on windows when dealing with other people, and my question is how exactly can i put my linux(mandrake) on my HD and be able to boot to either that or xp? help me im dumb.............

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mandrake is pretty much click your done, just pop in the cd, during the install it will give you an option to dual boot

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A good option would be Grub, it's used to boot into different operating systems. An even better option would be to install Grub to a floppy. That way when you want linux, just pop in the floppy and boot, when you want windows just leave it out. It'll give you an option for installing to floppy. If you don't want to go that route, just install to MBR and you should be set.

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im not one for dual-booting, but im pretty sure jedi is right on this one. Just pay attention when you are installing mandrake and it will ask you at the beginning how you want to do partitioning.

if the following insults your intelligence in any way, i mean no offense:

When you are dealing with windows, drives (hdd, cdrom, whatever) use letter names. Typically, the floppy is A and or B, the hdd is C, and cdrom(s) go in D,E, and so on. Network drives typically start at J or somewhere in there. In linux, things are a bit different. /dev/hda would be like (A) /dev/hda1 would be like (B) and so on. So when you get to the partitioning phase of your mandrake install, and you don't see C,D,E and whatever, dont worry.

I don't have much experience with mandrake, it didn't like the dvd/cdrom combo drive i used to install it, so redhat was my first distro by default. Also, in my redhat days i didnt know /dev/null from a hole in the ground (it is debatable weither i do now or not). But anyway, the plot thickens when it comes to mounting things like your floppy...

In slackware, my cdrom was originally found as /dev/hdb, but after doing the install it became /dev/cdrom all of a sudden. Im sure you can determine the difference between /dev/hda (the letters hd seem to give it away), and /dev/cdrom (hello mcfly)

sorry, i've been awake for over 24 hours... i know this post is crappy but working overnight is teh sux

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you could use virtual machines. then if you screw it up so bad that you can't get it back you don't have to worry about it, just delete and reinstall!

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...and on another totally off-topic note, "I am the queen of france" (directed to twirlz). I dunno if Mandrake does the Windows re-size and re-partitioning like I hear some distro's do, but you might need to slice it up and make room for another/more partition. Enter PartitionMagic, which'll allow you to chop up your Windows partition without loosing data. Then it's a matter of installing to the right partition, and adding your Windows partition to LILO.

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queen of france? hmmmmm ok..... however VM installs just the hard drive as if it was a regular file. i've installed mandrake on there before and it worked but after i did my box got fucked and i havn't installed it again!

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blah. It's from the movie of where you avatar is from, Rejected by Don Hertzfeld, IIRC. Yeah, I've used Bochs x86, very cool stuff.

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I dunno if Mandrake does the Windows re-size and re-partitioning like I hear some distro's do, but you might need to slice it up and make room for another/more partition.

pretty sure it does, not sure it will always work though, NTFS doesn't play well with others

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blah. It's from the movie of where you avatar is from, Rejected by Don Hertzfeld, IIRC. Yeah, I've used Bochs x86, very cool stuff.

sorry i was thinking about that later and i figured it out!

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How to dualboot linux and windows with ntldr the painless way (copied verbatim from a site i stumbled on a long time ago, which seems to have since taken the page down

How to dual-boot Windows NT/2000/XP and Linux using NTLDR

This tutorial is based on using LILO (linux loader) as your boot loader. It assumes you already have NT/2000/XP install and booting.

At the time of this writing, I was booting Linux, WindowsNT, and DOS 6.22 at home, and Linux, WindowsNT, and DR-OpenDOS 7.02 at work. It was pretty annoying, to me at least, to have the LILO prompt come up, type 'dos', and THEN have to select an option from the NTLDR menu which would pop up afterwards. I liked the menu presentation that NT gave at the time, so I chose to use NTLDR to boot them all from one selection. The only apparent disadvantage to this setup is that you need to update the linux boot image in the NTLDR when you install a new kernel. However, I don't imagine most average users switch kernels all that often, and those of you that do won't mind doing this, or already have a better solution in mind/in place.

That said, if you need/want this, read on. If not, skip it. :)

The first step in the process is to remove the current installation of LILO from the Master Boot Record (MBR), if you're already using it. If not, ignore this part. To accomplish this, type 'lilo -u <boot device>'. On my machine, this was /dev/hda, which corresponds to the MBR of the first detected hard drive. If all goes well, LILO will be uninstalled. DO NOT REBOOT at this point, your system will be inaccessible without a boot disk or CD.

The next step is to edit your LILO configuration file. It's usually /etc/lilo.conf. If lilo was installed in the MBR, the lilo.conf will reflect this. There are a couple changes to be made. Here is an example lilo.conf file:

boot=/dev/hda

map=/boot/map

install=/boot/boot.b

prompt

timeout=50

image=/vmlinuz.2.0.33

  label=linux

  root=/dev/hdb1

other=/dev/hda1

  label=windowsnt

 

This lilo.conf file is configured so that the boot device is /dev/hda. Tha's the MBR on the first detected hard drive. So we want to change that to be the linux root partition, which NTLDR will load up for us, instead of LILO loading the NTLDR. In my case, this is /dev/hdb1, the first partition of the second hard drive. Next, since NTLDR will be handling the booting, LILO doesn't need to know anything about the WindowsNT or DOS installs, nor how to boot them, so take out or comment out the prompt, timeout and other sections. It should now look like this:

boot=/dev/hdb1

map=/boot/map

install=/boot/boot.b

#prompt

#timeout=50

image=/vmlinuz.2.0.33

  label=linux

  root=/dev/hdb1

  read-only

#other=/dev/hda1

# label=windowsnt

 

By commenting out prompt, we tell LILO not to ask which selection to boot, it just picks the first one it sees, which is our linux kernel. The timeout option is only needed in conjunction with prompt, so that goes, too. The other section is what LILO normally would use to pass us off to the NTLDR, and now it won't bother.

The next thing to do is install LILO. This time, we want it on our linux root partition, instead of in the MBR. Since we've edited lilo.conf to specify the correct location already, all that's necessary is to run lilo. It may complain that lilo isn't being installed on the first drive, but since there will be a boot loader there (NTLDR), that's ok, and we can safely ignore the warning. Once this is done, keep reading, linux isn't quite bootable yet.

LILO is now installed on our linux root partition, but there's still nothing pointing it to linux. To get around this, we create a boot sector image file or sorts for the NTLDR to look at to boot linux. The way we do this is to use the dd program (copy/convert utility). The syntax we're looking for is: 'dd if=<root partition> of=<boot pointer file> bs=512 count=1'. This is a little more complicated than the bootdisk dd usage. <root partition> is of course your linux root partition, /dev/hdb1 in this case. <boot pointer file> is a file that will contain the boot sector image that NTLDR uses to boot linux. It's a physical copy of the first 512 bytes of the linux root partition, where LILO is now installed. Making sense now? :) bs=512 sets the block size to 512 bytes, and count=1 ensures that we only get one block in the image. I used: 'dd if=/dev/hdb1 of=bootsect.lnx bs=512 count=1'. You should now have a file called bootsect.lnx (which, if you're using WindowsNT and DOS, needs to be in DOS 8.3 filename format, which bootsect.lnx fits in.

The bootsect.lnx file is basically your linux boot sector. It will go on the NT/2000/XP partition, and be loaded by NTLDR. To add this to your NTLDR menu, you only need to edit the boot.ini file located in your Windows root directory (usually c:\.) Here's a sample boot.ini:

[boot loader]

timeout=10

default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT

[operating systems]

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00"

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows NT Workstation Version 4.00 [VGA mode]" /basevideo /sos

C:\="MS-DOS"

 

To add the bootsect.lnx file we created to the NTLDR configuration file, simply add a line that looks like this, reflecting your own decription:

C:\bootsect.lnx="Red Hat Linux Release 4.2 (Biltmore)"

 

Once you've edited the boot.ini and saved it, you should be good to go. When you reboot the machine, the NTLDR menu has a new option at the bottom, "Red Hat Linux Release 4.2 (Biltmore)" in this case. Select it, hit enter, and linux boots.

If you want linux to be your default cjoice, just change the default line to: default=C:\bootsect.lnx.

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heh, grub is generally eaiser than LILO, and installing mandrake doesn't give you a choice of bootloader I don't think, not does it let you enter in stuff by hand, it's just point and click your options

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I agree, Grub does seem to be easier and potentially alot prettier if you're into that!

Never knew you could use the NT bootloader to load Linux, I may have to give that a go later

Oh jedibebop, I know we've never talked before, but I'm in the process of getting a working Gentoo system up, and all I can say is wow. It's a pain in the ass with a certain combo of hardware. I'm running an ATI 9600 on an NForce2 mobo. It's getting difficult!

Edited by spite
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I have an nforce 2 mobo and a 9800 pro, both work fine :P

if you need help pm or something

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I have an nforce 2 mobo and a 9800 pro, both work fine :P

if you need help pm or something

is the onboard NIC well supported?

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Very, forcedeth > *

I found spite on freenode and told him about it already heh

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i got it and it works well, no another problem!!!! my linux intelligence is basically extremly limited to that i know about two things. when i start it up it loads, i have the option to boot windows, linux, linuxfb. fail safe, and floppy when i choose any of the linux options (linux is deafult choice) it boots but not into the gui its all script, dos style, so i type in my localhost name and password the it says my name and lets me type the command, my question is how do i get to the gui from ther what commands?

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Yeah forcedeth is great, only problem is that it messed up my routing table something fierce, but I got it all worked out. emerge was double the speed than when I used nvnet actually.

I just dunno if I'll stick with Gentoo. I love my Debian. Maybe there is something to ease of use :)

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