Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
tekio

Everyday Linux Programs You Cannot Live Without

7 posts in this topic

What are some Linux desktop application you cannot live without?

I am really amazed at how Linux has come over the past few years as a desktop operating system! No more than 5 years ago I had to run OSX to get the best of both worlds: a decent core computing platform with good productivity tools.  However, in the last few years it is now a reality: Linux easily can match MacOS as a productive desktop platform.

So apps making this possible for me:

Productivity:
- LibreOffice or OpenOffice
- Google Keep (Chrome App)
- Simple Note
- Makagiga (todo manager a little more robust than what Google Keep can offer)
- Draw.io (chrome app) pretty polished, robust and free diagramming app
- Journey (Chrome App)  Journal app that is pretty polished
- Caret polished cross-platform markup editor (simplenote just too many features for professional use)
- Dropbox is cross-platform and the free storage plan is good enough to sync important files across systems

Development:
- JetBrains IDE's PHPStorm, WebStorm, and Pycharm (community)
- Komodo Edit - offers a code runner, RegEx Toolkit and HTTP Debugger. Pricey but every few years it will go on sale for about 99 us
- SublimeText - worth 75 bones for me. Atom just takes too long to load. 
- RazorSQL - about $99 for a cross-platform SQL swiss-army knife.
- MySQL WorkBench
- Virtual Box
- VMWare Workstation (this supports level-1 nested hypervisors better for learning Hyper-V and vSphere)
- CMD tools of course is where Linux is a powerhouse: phpbrew, Python, GIT (dropbox works well for small repositories :-)  ), Vagrant, PHP, MySQL, etc...
- Leptop code snippet manager

Web / Internet / Networking
- Chrome
- Firefox for its dev extensions
- HexChat
- FileZilla
- WireShark (duh)
- nLoad
- nTop

Media:
- VideoStream (Chrome Plugin for streaming to Chromecast)
- Gimp
- VLC
- Pix image viewer

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7zip (in WINE, makes it basically a Linux program all the same)
Firefox
GFTP
Konsole
Konversation
Kwrite
Open Office
ssh
Pcmanfm
Wireshark (duh)
WINSCP (because fuck GFTP and all its 10-year old bugs)
VLC

I use it as mainly a desktop system, don't have much use for development/programming tools since I'm mainly a hardware hacker.

...and sol.exe (NT 5.1.2600) in WINE, can't live without sol, right?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you work for a living, Linux is not for you. I am not a fan of Microsoft, Apple has lost it, somedays Apple is just as bad as MS in reliability, and MS tries to be a Google (of which they aren't). I'm enslaved to Microsoft because I have a living. And many of the Linux apps do not play well in the Microsoft world. Open Office/Libre Office is a joke if you have to send a multi hundred page RFP to an enterprise that reads things off MS Office for an example. 

I know most BinRev users are not in professional work environment, but you're talking to one, so I have to defend Microsoft over my dead body. 

When Linux can start using vanity names instead of the raw app/process name to describe them and actually lay off case sensitive file systems (so people can start writing proper English again because they forget when they reply/respond to something as if they're still coding/compiling/etc.) - then I would take Linux more seriously.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

May I please handle this? Thank you!

 

Quote

I'm enslaved to Microsoft because I have a living. And many of the Linux apps do not play well in the Microsoft world. Open Office/Libre Office is a joke if you have to send a multi hundred page RFP to an enterprise that reads things off MS Office for an example. 

 

We are mostly Developers, System Administrators, and Analysts. Linux can send a 3000 page Office Document like a champ. Bits are transparent moving across the physical wire. I'd wager one year's professional salary Linux boxes move more Word Documents than Windows platforms. 

 

Quote

I'm enslaved to Microsoft because I have a living.

Are you Recptionist? My GF is and can use Word and Excel like a pro. She is actually certified in Excel and Power Point, the certs hang above her cubical.

 

Quote

I know most BinRev users are not in professional work environment, but you're talking to one, so I have to defend Microsoft over my dead body. 

When a Windows System Admin, I ran my Win10 Pro workstation in a VM (level2 hypervisor) on Linux. I could backup snapshots and have an IT workstation in case the worst happened and some CEO infected the entire Domain with some CIA Bitlocker MS-0Day variant. Simply boot Linux, put virtualized nodes on HA, and then run automated re-installs.

 

I could also do simple but professional level I.T. things without needing a CAL for every other connection.

 

 

Quote

When Linux can start using vanity names instead of the raw app/process name to describe them and actually lay off case sensitive file systems

but capitols are different letters. should ms revert to case insensative passwords? Really, this shows a serious lack of Computer Science knowledge.  :-)

 

:D

Edited by tekio
-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Except passwords are not file names. Mixed-case is a necessity in passwords for security. Comparing the two concepts is like comparing bananas to coconuts just because both grow in Hawai'i.

And here is a problem that will probably plague Linux until the end of time because of the "its always been done that way" syndrome.




Linux and many Unix-like file systems are infamous for being "case sensitive".

In this example, a number of files have been given the exact same name. The only difference is how the case is formatted.

In the real world, case does NOT change the meaning of a word. Case is simply extra formatting that can hint at emphasis, or indicate that a word is being used as a name or title.

But somewhere along the line some programmers only see that the machine representation "61 6D 62 69 67 75 6F 75 73" is not equal to "41 6D 62 69 67 75 6F 75 73" and they don't feel they can spare a couple of CPU cycles or revise some archaic standards from 1969 to perform a proper case insensitive comparison.

http://toastytech.com/guis/ubuntu103.html

In the real world, file.txt, File.txt, FILE.TXT, FiLe.TxT etc. are all the same single file in a directory. There is only one file in any given directory with that file name and that's that. When somebody calls you on the fone and tells you "send me file.txt" and you see several different files withthat same name, only different capitalization, which one are you going to send them? "file.txt" which contains your personal E-mail cache or "File.Txt" which contains the details for the Hoigy & Spymler Amalgamated Widgets account?

File system case sensitivity is a disease. Unix-like platforms in general have made tremendous advances in the way people operate computers but in some ways is still has its head stuck so far up its ass with stubborn traditionalism (cough cough ESR cough cough) that there are severe limitations that have yet to be overcome, yet could be overcome easily.

@Avaya - you do know it's possible to run Winshits software on Linsux, right?

Don't know if anybody's gotten OS suX compatibility going yet. I guess it probably falls into the "why even bother" category.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

In the real world, file.txt, File.txt, FILE.TXT, FiLe.TxT etc. are all the same single file in a directory. There is only one file in any given directory with that file name and that's that. When somebody calls you on the fone and tells you "send me file.txt" and you see several different files withthat same name, only different capitalization, which one are you going to send them? "file.txt" which contains your personal E-mail cache or "File.Txt" which contains the details for the Hoigy & Spymler Amalgamated Widgets account?

They need to be more specific, re-write the application outputting file names, or learn to name files better

 

"Hoigy & Spymler"

You would run a case insensitive search with built-in logic "WHERE company_name is LIKE Hoi% OR company_name LIKE hoi%" 

That will be handled at the application layer, not the file-system level.  Issues are in procedure if you're not storing this in a database. Even though case-sensitive provides both faster search and sorting with extensive searches at the file-system level (looking at bits) we have been using databases for optimizing searches like this since the 1960's.

 

In your case when storing client files as text you'd need to fully use find, grep, egrep or awk with RegEx. With much power comes responsibility. So like I stated, if you're a computer science person you want case-sensitive - if you just need to find file names and not be worried about optimization Fat-32 or NTFS is fine and dandy. 

 

 

 

It all comes down-computer science: there are 100 ways to do anything. But only a few to do it right, MS chose something more user friendly. 

 

 

 

Edited by tekio
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EDIT: to further elaborate in computer science terms: let's pretend we work for a law-firm needing to search contents of PDF files. They have thousands. We index PDF files on Micoshift. Then all of a sudden notice nobody can login into the domain. Since everything is centralized authentication and it costs an average of 5000.00 per server in licensing the these files were put onto a Domain controller. We are finally able to get in and see the Windows Search Service is taking 100% resources indexing PDF files. This is fine for three hours or more, But these PDF files are edited daily and tie up our Domain Controller all day long

 

Like most MCSE Microshift experts, we ignored best practice of leaving Domain Controllers to handle AD only. Besides, we already have separate licenses for SQL Server and Exchange running on two separate Windows Server Virtual Hosts with client access licenses for 500 users (5 grand or more each). So with our Domain Controller acting as a file-sever, nobody can login? Our slow searching, but easy to find file-system for end-users is needing to index all day long.  

 

So now we have a huge task: meeting to secure another 5000 in IT resources. Moving Terabytes of files to something with a more efficient file system in the sort-term (like a 500 dollar NAS running what kernel? (either BSD or Linux). As well as the immediate problem that Windows does not control tasks like Linux. So before we can even troubleshoot, more than likely we need to reboot the Winshaft server for any Admin access.. The admin could an extra CPU socket to try and pick up the slack, but that involves an upgrade path to Server Enterprise with new CALs.

 

That is a scenario I've dealt with before. Linux? Much for efficient and  a shell script can written to find whatever some CEO who cannot name files needs.

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0