Cr4X

Opensource linux?

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I want to switch to linux, but i don't know anything about it. So before i use a lot of money on an operating system i don't know, i would like to find a free version of it, but where can i find it?

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You can download almost any linux distro for free. http://linuxiso.org If you dont have a cd burner alot of places will burn cd's and sell em for a few bucks. You could also find your local LUG(linux user group) here ... http://www.linux.org/groups/index.html ... and drop than an email. Im sure someone has an old set of cd's they can let you borrow/have.

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Thanks for the links :)

But there is a LOT of versions, wich one is good for newbies?

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everybody has their favorite flavor. I am pretty much a nubie also, and I use redhat 8. It has a lot of support for questions.

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If you need help just ask. I use DEBIAN! and have been running it exclusivly for over 10 months now. I would not switch back. You might want to try to use Knoppix to get used to Linux, then install it. A lot of new people install it and get mad because they can't do things, when in reality they just don't know how or it got messed up.

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I haven't used a lot of different distros, as I am also a noob when it comes to linux, but out of the ones I have used, Red Hat 9 has been the "simplest" to install and use. Personally, I really don't like Red Hat. I downloaded Slackware 10.2 from www.slackware.com and have been really happy with it. I'm not sure how you as a person learns, but I found it really useful to take a few distros and create multi-boot system. The problems you runs into (if you run into any) will prompt you to read into things you might not otherwise have thought of....or you'll just get completely outraged and throw your box! hehe Anyways, just my view of things :)

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I personally use Ubuntu, which is very newbie-friendly.

Apart from that and the ones mentionned here, other standard newbie-friendly distros are Fedora Core, Mandriva, Freespire, and SuSE. I personally think that something along the lines of Freespire makes a good OS to familiarize Windows-users to Linux.

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If you want to try something that a lot of us Linux kiddies have been excited about for a while without having to leave the comforts of the LiveCD, check out the Kororaa XGL LiveCD. You'll have to actually google for a torrent for it now since they took it down because they started having license dilemmas.

But yeah. Go on youtube and look up "XGL" and you'll get lots of videos showing you what it basically is.

I'm not aware of any other LiveCDs that come with XGL as default. (If anybody knows any others, I'd be curious to hear myself.)

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Ubuntu is only good for people who want to USE linux out of the box without learning it. In my opinion, if you want to learn Linux, Ubunut is one of the worst distros for that. If you are trying to learn linux then install Slackware or Debian. If you just want to use Linux then go with Ubuntu.

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Damn, Jan 3 2003, 02:39 PM :blink:

Really, I think there is little difference between etch and ubuntu. At least to the novice user. Both work pretty well out of the box now. If you want you can do a server install for that nostalgic rewrite-your-X-config-file-by-hand feeling, but it really isn't the same without XFree86. Damn new kernels and xorg all working right and shit.

(since this is NHQ: Newbs, please disregard the last couple of sentences. Inside joke) :P

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Ubuntu is only good for people who want to USE linux out of the box without learning it. In my opinion, if you want to learn Linux, Ubunut is one of the worst distros for that. If you are trying to learn linux then install Slackware or Debian. If you just want to use Linux then go with Ubuntu.

Ubuntu == What Debian aspires to be.

I've used Linux for years and honestly, Ubuntu is a choice distro to use because it works. If it doesn't work, there's a REAL community behind that can help you get it working. There's less of the archaic searching and searching and hoping than there was in the late 90s.

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Ubuntu is only good for people who want to USE linux out of the box without learning it. In my opinion, if you want to learn Linux, Ubunut is one of the worst distros for that. If you are trying to learn linux then install Slackware or Debian. If you just want to use Linux then go with Ubuntu.

Ubuntu == What Debian aspires to be.

I've used Linux for years and honestly, Ubuntu is a choice distro to use because it works. If it doesn't work, there's a REAL community behind that can help you get it working. There's less of the archaic searching and searching and hoping than there was in the late 90s.

I second that motion. I use Debian, Slackware, and Ubuntu and I love Ubuntu. Ubuntu has all the best Debian features with the ease of use and package managment. The most frustrating thing for new Linux users is getting software and Ubuntu makes is so easy it is no longer an issue. There are a lot of package managers but Ubuntu makes it easy for a Windows user to move over to Ubuntu and use package manager like they are used to use windows update. Go with Ubuntu.

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I want to switch to linux, but i don't know anything about it. So before i use a lot of money on an operating system i don't know, i would like to find a free version of it, but where can i find it?

Linux the kernel is under the GNU GPL, the source has to be freely available in order to be under the GPL. All of the software in debian is GNU or under another licenses very close to the GNU one. If I'm not mistake none of the Xs (XFree86, Xorg, ...) are under the GNU GPL, but the source is open and it is free to get a copy. learning a new OS is good and all but make sure you also under stand what it stands for. The whole reason I moved to linux is because of the openness of it.

I will be a slave to no one.

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You should start with Zenwalk Slackware

www.zenwalk.org

Whats so diffrent from Zenwalk Slackware, and actual Slackware?

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zenwalk has been using the 2.6 kernel for a while now and it has a perferred window manager, xfce

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zenwalk has been using the 2.6 kernel for a while now and it has a perferred window manager, xfce

Yeah, later kernel, xfce, and netpkg.

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Ubuntu is great for people who want to start using linux. I am trying to get OpenSuse 10.1 now. It's taking a very very long time because of the slow internet at my school. I am using bittorent running through tor. They block torrents. FTP is a lot faster but I can't find any server that supports resuming interrupted downloads. Anyone know of one?

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As far as newb friendly I'd have to say ubuntu. Then eventually switch to debian.

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Ubuntu is great for people who want to start using linux. I am trying to get OpenSuse 10.1 now. It's taking a very very long time because of the slow internet at my school. I am using bittorent running through tor. They block torrents. FTP is a lot faster but I can't find any server that supports resuming interrupted downloads. Anyone know of one?

Ubuntu is not good for learning Linux. It's only good for learning GNOME. Don't believe me? Get somebody who has only used ubuntu to set up their wireless connection through the command line. And get them to compile their kernel and kernel mods. And get them to mount their usb drives manually.

They won't know how would they? Cause ubuntu does everything for them thus they never needed to actually learn how to use linux.

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Ubuntu is great for people who want to start using linux. I am trying to get OpenSuse 10.1 now. It's taking a very very long time because of the slow internet at my school. I am using bittorent running through tor. They block torrents. FTP is a lot faster but I can't find any server that supports resuming interrupted downloads. Anyone know of one?

Ubuntu is not good for learning Linux. It's only good for learning GNOME. Don't believe me? Get somebody who has only used ubuntu to set up their wireless connection through the command line. And get them to compile their kernel and kernel mods. And get them to mount their usb drives manually.

They won't know how would they? Cause ubuntu does everything for them thus they never needed to actually learn how to use linux.

Exactly. Slackware ftw! :P

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