An0nym0u5

trojan
Sub7 and Trojans?

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Okay so I'm new to this but I find it fascinating and I'd love to aim to be a grey-hat hacker and I'm intrigued as to what Sub7 really is, what a Trojan is and does, if it's worth looking into and how to get hold of it?

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Sub7 is ancient stuff, you can probably find it or one of its workalikes (Optix, BackOrifice, et c.) on some skiddie/malware archive. I suppose it could be useful to experiment with in your home lab if you've never seen it.

 

Basically, it's a remote command/control malware. In middle school, my friends and I played pranks on each other and some of our less tech-savvy friends with it. I'd imagine even the worst possible modern virus scanner would pick it up. It may not work with anything XP or newer, IIRC when we were goofing around with it, most people were running 98 or a few ME users. We thought we were hot shit running Windows 2000 :D

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Essentially, don't let that stuff loose in the wild. That's not hacking at all. Keep it in the lab. Not that it can really do too much these days anyhow, it's pretty obsolete for the most part.

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They are referred to as RATs, Remote Access Trojan. Trojan comes from the term Trojan Horse. Back in the AOL (or AO Hell), they were packaged as Punters, Flooders or MailBombs. 

 

As mentioned - not really hacking unless you're programming them yourself and finding ways to evade malware scans.

 

Things like Sub7 are little apps that allow for administration operations on a Windows box. Various things like: editing the registry, taking screen shots, logging key strokes, retrieving passwords, sniffing sockets, etc... Then reporting this information by "phoning home".

 

Defining "trojan", Remote Administration Tool, Spyware, Remote Access Tool; is really up to Malware scanning companies and intended use. For a while, the best backdoors were hacked version s of VNC  (without an installer) with a few Microsoft remote tools found in Windows Sever Resource Kits. Its best to use things made for legitimate purposes and retool them for what one needs. If an executable is digitally signed by Microsoft it is usually automatically trusted by default in a lot host-based Firewalls and A.V. scanners.

Edited by tekio
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Ahh AOHell Those were the good old days. Not hacking but just stupid harmless phun.

(misty-eyed with nostalgia)

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On 9/16/2017 at 9:16 PM, scratchytcarrier said:

Ahh AOHell Those were the good old days. Not hacking but just stupid harmless phun.

(misty-eyed with nostalgia)

I actually worked in tech support for AOL back in those days. At 19-20 something was the best job ever. Not only did I get free "all you can eat" Internet back in the early 90's; but they paid me overtime to browse the web all day/night long while helping people put a CD in a computer and configure a modem.

 

There really was no downside until they finally went out of business. 

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