Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Abignale

How to create ghost accounts

17 posts in this topic

Hi everyone. First of all sorry about my shitty english.

What i wanna do is register multiple accounts in a web that doesnt allowed it. I mean, i suppose that Google or Facebutt can know for sure how many accounts have been created in 1 pc, but for simple web like portal, forum (like this one), that are not a corporation precisely, the detection mechanism for multiple accounts are no more than IP, maybe name of domain if using proxy, cookies and ultimately mac address, right?

So my question is: If I create virtual machines in my pc (to use different mac address), I use proxy and delete all the cookies, is there any other lead for the web to find out what im doing?

Thanks!

 

PD: I dont know how to do this stuff haha

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The question is a little confusing. Are you saying you want to create multiple accounts in a web app that doesn't allow multple accounts?

 

Is this an external web application? If so, changing your MAC probably won't help much. Once traffic leaves your network, nothing will see the MAC address you use on your internal network adapter. As a side note, you can change MAC address without using a VM.

 

If the application is using your IP addess to identify you, you should be able to jump through a proxy. If they store a token or something in a cookie (of other client side storage), you should be able to delete it (or open a private windows/new browser/new browser session etc) to bypass it. You could even script something with a little *nix or powershell knowledge.

 

I guess it boils down to this: try a few things. Figure out how they detect you, and find a way to bypass it. I personally can't think of any way they could detect you that couldn't be bypassed. Some would slow me down (e.g. requiring a phone number for registration) but you first need to know what they check.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You just need good proxies. OR even a VPN account that can let you log into different VPN servers.

 

Use TOR browser or even Chrome with a different user profile, running ghostery, in a private tab.

TOR is slow, but uses the TOR network and does stuff help hide its client-side profile.

 

Using a different profile in Chrome for each account, in a private tab (maybe don't even need a private tab), with the Ghostery plugin, and no other plugins or extensions, with a different window size - will help make it difficult to create a client-side profile to track.

 

That is easily do-able and possible without a good VPN service. However, difficulty depends on how good they check for proxies. Finding good proxies can be hit or miss these days. There are blacklist service that check IP addresses against TOR nodes and known proxies. As well as forensics to check for a proxy or TOR use. But usaully they use a blacklisting service. So... finding unlisted, elite proxies should work.

 

The link below is a tutorial I made a few years ago on how to find anonymous proxies. The proxy checker I used has been discontinued. Though mine was registered and paid for, they came out with a freeware version Let me know if you'd like me to upload it.... 

http://www.screencast.com/t/j4RcS5LiTBAq

Edited by tekio
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your ISP/telco/whichever uses dynamic IP addressing you may not even need to use a proxy initially (but probably should be set up for one at some point regardless). Enter your transceiver's ("modem") configuration page (should probably be at http://192.168.0.1/ unless it's some nonstandard proprietary garbage like a Crapple or something, check the instructions) and you should find a thing in there to set it to dynamic or static. Set it to dynamic and reboot it. Or if it's already on dynamic addressing you just need to reboot it and that's it, voila, new IP number.

Alternately you can perform a "hard reboot": this is done by power cycling. Kill power for about 15-30 seconds or so then turn it back on (or plug it back in).

Hey, it works for me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing to keep in mind is that Time Warner Cable, which supposedly gives you a dynamic IP, provides extremely long allocation times. We've had the same IP for the entire 5 years we've had this particular cable modem, and it has gone through a few days of being powered off.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

at least in my area TWC will give out MULTIPLE public IP addresses from a DHCP cable modem if you bridge it.. 

 

I have many customers who have physically isolated networks, different routers, switches, wiring, connected to the same bridged TWC modem and each modem gets a separate public IP and the modem is not included in a traceroute.. 

 

also ISP DHCP leases are usually binded to your MAC address... so many times rebooting your router/modem/ont is not going to get you a new IP, but if you change the MAC address of the router after you reboot all of these things then you should get a new IP... keep in mind, with FiOS you MUST release your IP in the routers GUI under the WAN settings before connecting a device with a different MAC, or changing your MAC.. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some also go by the MAC address of the modem/gateway provided by them (as nyphonejacks was leading on to). I know Comcast (in my area does). That I know of, there is no way release without SNMP write access. 

 

I've tried getting SNMP access to a comcast device before, but failed. Actually had the harddrive on my laptop crash about 24 hours into an SNMP brute-force attack on SNMP to the modem.

 

 

I think that's what they use to load /manage updates, etc.. for their modems/gateways.

 

Cneturylink will release the IP address and get a new one, each time the gateway device is rebooted (at least in my area).

 

 

 

EDIT:

nyphonejacks?

 

Can I bridge a Comcast gateway/router?  Can you explain how? 

 

 

EDIT2: 

Ok. Just googled and mine has bridging disababled. In the manual it quotes as having a bridging option. But it is not there. I'm guessing this has been disabled by Comcast. :-(

 

 

2015_07_23_19_09_20_At_a_Glance_XFINITY.HOW8383_image003.png

Edited by tekio
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've tried getting SNMP access to a comcast device before, but failed. Actually had the harddrive on my laptop crash about 24 hours into an SNMP brute-force attack on SNMP to the modem.

 

Was this on a home router or something? Did you try pulling off the firmware or trying to access the filesystem/config some other way? I'm thinking looking for UART/JTAG ports on the board.

 

 

Ok. Just googled and mine has bridging disababled. In the manual it quotes as having a bridging option. But it is not there. I'm guessing this has been disabled by Comcast. :-(

 

This excites me. I wonder whether it's disabled, or just removed from the web interface.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AFAIK you can't bridge comcast.. 

 

Comcast isn't available in the NYC area, but we do have customers outside of NYC that have comcast, and even trying to call them to bridge the modems has been either hit-or-miss or completely unsuccessful, although this is mostly going off of the guy in my office who does most of our remote support... I think (although i may be mistaken, being overworked as I have been) that I may have tried to bridge their modems with the GUI. 

 

I am sure that if you buy your own modem instead of using the one that they provide you you should be able to bridge it. 

 

I have come across DSL modems that were not able to be bridged, as well as TWC modems that were not able to be put into bridge mode, or not able to REALLY be put into a bridge mode... 

 

if a modem is bridged, as in a real transparent bridge the ISP DHCP leases should be binded to the routers MAC address not the modems MAC address.. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even with my old Motorola Surfboard Modem, I could not bridge it. The manual for the model I have, states there should be a bridging option, as does Comcast's tech site for the modem...

 

The screenshots were for a Comcast SMC device. It really pisses my off, too. I don't want to use their crappy wifi (for several reasons). And.... I don't want to double NAT two subnets.... Maybe I'll into buying a 3rd party modem,that will work. 

 

Still.. really, really interested into gaining access to the SNMP service running on it....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the surfboard isn't automatically in bridge mode? I dont recall those being all in one router/modems... thought they were already transparent bridged out of the box.. but dont think they are DOCSIS 3.0 or whatever the latest version is, so speed would likely suffer... 

 

what if you factory reset the modem that they gave you and tried to put it into bridge mode before reconecting the rg6? or would whatever they push down the line undo any changes you have done to the modem config? 

 

 

EDIT: static IP may be your only option for effectively eliminating a double NAT by using your own router behind their modem... 

Edited by nyphonejacks
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the surfboard isn't automatically in bridge mode? I dont recall those being all in one router/modems... thought they were already transparent bridged out of the box.. but dont think they are DOCSIS 3.0 or whatever the latest version is, so speed would likely suffer... 

 

what if you factory reset the modem that they gave you and tried to put it into bridge mode before reconecting the rg6? or would whatever they push down the line undo any changes you have done to the modem config? 

 

 

EDIT: static IP may be your only option for effectively eliminating a double NAT by using your own router behind their modem... 

Not the ones from Comcast. 

 

I guess we might be getting bridging confused, but the way explained in the original message is causing my confusion

 

 

Comcast bridging with Motorola Surfboard:

 

comcast network -> Motorola Modem (Submnet of 192.168.100.1 cannot be changed and Mac is associated with DHCP or BootP)  -> home router

 

 

So... that actually acts as a seperate sub-net from and needs to be NATed.

 

 

 

True bridging:

bridged device (no network level associations)  -> router/ap with subnet and DHCP for the subnet, connecting to WAN link

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yup, if a modem is properly bridged if you run a traceroute then you shouldn't get the modem as the 2nd hop... 

 

if a modem is not truly bridged then a traceroute will give your router as the first hop, then the modem as the second hop... 

 

been a while since i saw a surfboard out in the wild.. most of the motorola modems that I have seen lately are 4 port modems that optimum online generally only provides for static IP customers.. 

 

Sorry I can't give much help with comcast, as most of my knowledge/experience is with TWC, Optimum (cablevision), Verizon Fios and DSL... 

 

With TWC some modems you are able to bridge directly with the GUI, but the easiest method is to just call them up and have them put the modem into bridge mode - it is best to keep them on the phone and for you to test before you hang up with them because occasionally they will not do this properly, and/or certain modems do not properly bridge

 

With Optimum, they are generally bridged already because they do not generally use combo router/modem devices and give you a shit "smart router" that is not really compatible with SIP so I generally remove these as soon as I arrive at a customer

 

With Verizon DSL, most modems are able to be placed into bridge mode under the "networks" settings in the GUI, however I have come across at least one combo router/modem that is not capable of being placed into bridge mode (sorry forgot brand/model), I usually replace those modems right away.

 

With FiOS, since most my customers are business customers with out TV services I replace the shit actiontec routers they install. The modem needs to be connected to the ONT via CAT5/6 and not coax/RG6. Log into the GUI, release the DHCP lease, then remove the router and connect the new router. Without releasing the DHCP lease you will not get an IP, supposedly after the lease expires the new router should pick up an IP, but who has around 2 hours to sit around and wait? When they have TV services I just disable SIP ALG and hope for the best, some customers will experience VoIP issues with the actiontec while others seem to either not have any problems, or do not report any problems to us. 

 

*(I know this information isn't relevant or helpful to YOUR situation, but perhaps will help someone else using one of these services, sorry I couldn't be of more help) 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, all my stuff has been through Comcast. I pretty sure they are specially made for Comcast, vs. a true OEM device. I might try getting a Motorola Surf Board that has not been branded for Comccast..

 

My Qwest modem could be bridged as well....

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

have you tried to call them to see if they will bridge it from their end? 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

have you tried to call them to see if they will bridge it from their end? 

Haha! You don't have Comcast.

 

I wait for up to 2hrs to sign up, or transfer service, etc.... That's why I bitch about Comcast a lot. They have the attitude of: "we're the only one offering high-seed internet in your area. Screw off or wait, and screw-off like this or wait this long....".

 

At least in my area they are like that.... But now, my HOA is contracted with Comcast where I get free Basic (standard definition) Xfinity and 105Mbps for about 35/per month with their modem. So guess I cannot complain too much... At least for the next 12 months, while the price is locked in.

 

 

Honestly, I don't think a Comcast tech would know what bridging is, let alone how to do it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol... true, I don't really have much experience with them.... and most of my experience with other ISPs is on business class service, which usually has its own phone number and CSR agents with usually faster response times then residential service.. 

 

I guess its like me trying to argue with the Verizon FiOS tech support people because I don't use their shit router/modem that they can not troubleshoot issues with my home internet connection

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0