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systems_glitch

Does anyone use IPv6?

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Survey says: "no"

$ gzcat /var/www/logs/access*.gz | perl -ne 'if ($_ =~ /^([\da-f:]+) /sg) { print "$1\n"} ' | sort | uniq | wc -l       5

And all of those are from my home subnet or one of the subnets at work :(

 

Anyone else here have full IPv6 connectivity?

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I don't even have IP6 connectivity, period.

Maybe someday, when Centuryshit gets its head out of its ass. But right now IP4 seems to work well enough, so why fix something that isn't broken? I don't know. I've read about it and IP6 just seems... weird.

Just my $2.00 worth. (inflation)

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I don't even have IP6 connectivity, period.

Maybe someday, when Centuryshit gets its head out of its ass. But right now IP4 seems to work well enough, so why fix something that isn't broken? I don't know. I've read about it and IP6 just seems... weird.

Just my $2.00 worth. (inflation)

IPV4 exhaustion. and the Internet of "thingy ma-bobbers". We can put a shit-ton of crap on the Interwebz for people to hack and put malware on now -- even U.S. military airplanes. :-/

I keep saying I'm gonna put my home network on IPV6. Been saying that for about three four years now and its lost its leetness by now. 

But no, not Comcast where I live. 

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My connection is IPv4 only as well -- home and office (Time Warner). Both locations run through Hurricane Electric tunnels.

 

IPv6 is, in my opinion, a return to the way things used to be, before everything was NATed (at least once) in IPv4 land. I've got my entire private LAN set up with dual-stack (IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously) which allows for some nifty things. Probably most useful is the return to globally resolvable DNS: whether you're on the LAN or the Internet in general, the same FQDNs point to the exact same addresses. This definitely makes running your own shell server, Git repos, et c. much nicer. And your hostnames don't change if you're connected through VPN.

 

Plus, since it's running on IPv6, the primary DNS server for the LAN subnet is actually *on* the LAN subnet. Makes management/dynamic DNS easier.

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I get IP6 connectivity -- or so I think. When using Bittorrent to find IP ranges to have "fun" with, I need to filter out the IPv6. 

 

The only thing that scares me about IPv6 is memorizing them. I have conditioned my brain to memorize IPv4 and MAC addresses. But remembering FE80:80E0:01EE:0000:0202:B3FF:FE1E:8329 is pushing shit at my age. :-(

Edited by tekio
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My connection is IPv4 only as well -- home and office (Time Warner). Both locations run through Hurricane Electric tunnels.

IPv6 is, in my opinion, a return to the way things used to be, before everything was NATed (at least once) in IPv4 land. I've got my entire private LAN set up with dual-stack (IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously) which allows for some nifty things. Probably most useful is the return to globally resolvable DNS: whether you're on the LAN or the Internet in general, the same FQDNs point to the exact same addresses. This definitely makes running your own shell server, Git repos, et c. much nicer. And your hostnames don't change if you're connected through VPN.

Plus, since it's running on IPv6, the primary DNS server for the LAN subnet is actually *on* the LAN subnet. Makes management/dynamic DNS easier.

And as an added bonus it also makes it much easier for others to install nefarious WWW servers which sit both inside your lan and outside your firewall :P Edited by mSparks
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And as an added bonus it also makes it much easier for others to install nefarious WWW servers which sit both inside your lan and outside your firewall :P

 

 

Heh, there are probably a lot of "allow any -> any" rules on IPv6 firewalls, out there :D

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And as an added bonus it also makes it much easier for others to install nefarious WWW servers which sit both inside your lan and outside your firewall :P

Heh, there are probably a lot of "allow any -> any" rules on IPv6 firewalls, out there :D

And for everyone else there's tor :)

Edited by mSparks
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But remembering FE80:80E0:01EE:0000:0202:B3FF:FE1E:8329 is pushing shit at my age.

Hence:

IP6 just seems... weird.

They really could have (could still?) made IP6 strings less vile, for the benefit of humans. Assembly languages use mnemonics for binary strings to make them better human-parsible, there's gotta be some way to abbreviate IP6 numbers. (and I don't mean DNS.)

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There is: any single span of zeros can be represented as "::", and you don't need to type leading zeros. For instance:

 

redshirt.troy.theglitchworks.net -> 2001:470:1f07:b75:f00d::2 == 2001:0470:1f07:0b75:f00d:0000:0000:0002

 

Additionally, the first four groupings (2001:470:1f07:b75 in the above example) are your subnet number, and the only part you really have to memorize. The rest can be whatever numbering scheme you want -- in the above, host 2 is on the "f00d" subnet.

 

But yes, ultimately the answer is, "give it a DNS mapping!"

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Haha! I can agree Scratchy. But when talking simplicity, elegant, and easy: binary and assembly were not the best jargon to throw out. 

 

My subnet routers are 5.0.10.1 and 192.168.157.1. No tricks to remembering that. Localhost in  IPV6 is easy: ::1

 

 

EDIT: as far as easier to remember, I was talking about just looking at logs and NOT needing writing stuff down for meetings etc...  

 

Boss: what was that I.P. address that kept showing up in the loge three days ago?

I.T. Guy: 192.145.66.84

 

 

I mean, I can remember IPV4 pretty well. I can still remember some of my home IP addresses from years ago after just looking at them once or twice.

Edited by tekio
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