JCSwishMan33

Janning Goodness

17 posts in this topic

So after many fanciful discussions with fellow forum-heads, I decided to get down and dirty for some phreakish phun.

... Okay, enough of that. Heh.

Basically this is stemming out of trying to identify my particular switch, if it's attached to another switch, yada yada. This'll be an ongoing project for me, but I wanted to share in case other folks wanted in on the fun, or could help ID some of the numbers I couldn't. Any questions, complaints, or compliments can be shot to me. I'm a grown-up and can handle it. :)

So, without further ado...

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440-355-98XX Dials (from 440-309-4, TWC subscriber line, with *67 active):

Standard intercept seems to be a Pat Fleet recorded message

9800-5: Intercept

9806: Business Sub: Nationwide Insurance

9807: Subscriber?; Old-School Answering Machine?

9808: Fax?

9809-15: Intercept

9816: Subscriber

9817: Intercept

9818: "The person you have dialed can't take your call now." - Different voice than Intercept

9819-21: Intercept

9822: Ring Ad Infinitum

9823: Fax?

9824-5: Subscriber

9826: Intercept

9827: Business Sub: Howard's

9828-32: Intercept

9833-4: Subscriber

9835: "Privacy Status" Intercept

9836: Intercept

9837: Subscriber (robotic VM when called)

9838: Subscriber

9839-41: Intercept

9842: Subscriber (robotic VM when called)

9843-8: Intercept

9849: Subscriber

9850: Intercept; SIT and text different than standard, includes readback of the number dialed

9851: Subscriber

9852-3: Intercept

9854: "Privacy Status" Intercept

9855: Subscriber

9856: Intercept

9857-8: Subscriber

9859: Intercept

9860: Fax?

9861: Intercept; SIT and text different than standard

9862: Ring Ad Infinitum

9863: ~2226Hz Tone for 28 seconds

9864: Ring Ad Infinitum

9865: Modem?

9866: Ring Ad Infinitum

9867: Ring Ad Infinitum

9868: Modem?

9869: Modem?

9870: Ring Ad Infinitum

9871: Ring Ad Infinitum

9872: Intercept

9873: ??? (First call sounded like long-haul carrier noise with maybe a 1300Hz tone for about 15 seconds, then reorder. Subsequent calls sounded like silent termination for about 15 seconds, then reorder)

9874: Intercept; SIT and text different than standard

9875: Intercept

9876: Ring Ad Infinitum

9877-8: Intercept

9879-80: Ring Ad Infinitum

9881: Intercept

9882: 10 second MW

9883: MW, ~8 seconds on, ~1 second off

9884: MW, ~8 seconds on, ~1 second off

9885: ANAC; will read through Privacy Setting

9886: Intercept; Text different than standard, includes readback of the number dialed

9887-97: Intercept

9898: Busy

9899: "Not Accepting Calls" Intercept

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telcodata.us says you've got a Northern Telecom DMS-10

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355 is a DMS-10, yeah. But 309 is a mix of companies. Think my TWC service is probably some virtual switch, but...

I guess it's more of an education practice than anything? Heh.

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from 440-309-4, TWC subscriber line

 

Ahh, okay. I thought you had a Windstream line in that prefix. If it's TWC, you're probably going to a switch that's nowhere near here.

 

If anyone is interested in those modems, 9863, 9868, and 9869 use 7/O/1 and answer with "PASSWORD ?". 9865 is 7/E/1 and answers with "RMAC-ENTER PASSWORD :".

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from 440-309-4, TWC subscriber line

 

Ahh, okay. I thought you had a Windstream line in that prefix. If it's TWC, you're probably going to a switch that's nowhere near here.

 

If anyone is interested in those modems, 9863, 9868, and 9869 use 7/O/1 and answer with "PASSWORD ?". 9865 is 7/E/1 and answers with "RMAC-ENTER PASSWORD :".

 

As in the the username is "7/0/1" and the password is "PASSWORD" ?

Also what modem program do you recommend  for linux for dialing into systems?

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As in the the username is "7/0/1" and the password is "PASSWORD" ?

Negatory. 7/O/1 is the error correction / compression settings (I forget the actual terminology) for properly connecting to the modem being dialed. And when he said the modem answers with "PASSWORD ?", he means that after the handshaking and all is done, that phrase is the first thing that appears on the screen of whatever terminal program you used to dial out.

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7 data bits/Odd parity bit/1 stop bit.

Basically it refers to the way the serial port is configured to transfer data to and from the modem. Remember that, in principle, an analog modem is really just an adapter that enables a computer to use a telephone network as an extension of its serial port. 7O1/7E1 (even parity), if I remember right, are really old nonstandard settings that were mosty used to transfer text amongst DEC (?) and other mainframes in the '70s/'80s (X-25, anybody?) and maybe some really ancient low-ASCII only bulletin board systems.

8N1 (8 data/no parity/1 stop) is arguably the most widely used configuration since it matches the data length of a single byte, hence it is commonly used for binary and text data transfers. (Remember accessing bulletin boards or the World Wide Web through your ISP's dialup service back in the day? Chances are really good that's the configuration they used since it's pretty much a de facto industry standard.) Systems that use 7O/E1 configurations are probably either really, really old or its operators are engaged in security via obscurity, since those configurations are so little used these days.

Or something like that. At least I think that's what it's about. It's been way too many years since I've used that kind of tech.

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At least I think that's what it's about.

 

Sounds right to me. You'll see newish telecom stuff that uses 7/E/1 pretty frequently, though. And security by obscurity. It's nice (and rare) when you can just hit enter and something tells you what it is. Even if they are a pain in the ass sometimes, it's a good idea to have a modem, especially for CLEC exchanges built in the nineties. Occasionally, you'll find some really nice things lying around on a modem. And unlike every internet facing server ever, it won't be mobbed by bots.

 

Also what modem program do you recommend  for linux for dialing into systems?

 

Minicom is a good choice. You'll run into some trouble if you find something that wants some unusual kind of terminal emulation, but for 99% of what's out there, it'll work just fine.

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At least I think that's what it's about.

 

Sounds right to me. You'll see newish telecom stuff that uses 7/E/1 pretty frequently, though. And security by obscurity. It's nice (and rare) when you can just hit enter and something tells you what it is. Even if they are a pain in the ass sometimes, it's a good idea to have a modem, especially for CLEC exchanges built in the nineties. Occasionally, you'll find some really nice things lying around on a modem. And unlike every internet facing server ever, it won't be mobbed by bots.

 

 

 

Also what modem program do you recommend  for linux for dialing into systems?

 

Minicom is a good choice. You'll run into some trouble if you find something that wants some unusual kind of terminal emulation, but for 99% of what's out there, it'll work just fine.

 

I found that and another one called wvdial. How does wvdial work? I am gonna test it out soon, since i am gonna buy a modem today.

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wvdial is for dial-up internet; it won't let you interact with anything. It's designed to push bits into a PPP daemon. If you want to play with a modem, you just need something that emulates a serial terminal; that's what Minicom does. If you happen to have anything else in your house that connects to your computer's serial port, like a Cisco router or a 5ESS, you'll probably notice that you can use the exact same software to interact with it.

 

With the exception of softmodems, a modem is a completely self-contained device. The terminal emulator is just responsible for send/receive bits from it. So you'll need to know a little bit about the Hayes command set to interact with it, what serial port (or virtual serial port if it's USB. Though beware that most USB modems are soft or host controlled modems. It's not a big deal, but they can be a pain to get running under Linux) it's assigned to, and you're basically set.

 

If you're still shopping around, you might want to consider getting a US Robotics Courier. They're pretty cheap on eBay, and among the best modems out there.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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Hope everyone had a good holiday.

I plan on getting back to this soon. Just been spending time with family and whatnot.

After doing some talking with TP before, and finally getting it to repeat for me, 9873 is an occasion bit-robbed carrier for about 15 seconds, then switch reorder. TP was able to get it to repeat on each call, whereas I've only gotten the occasional repeat (like 1 in 15-20 calls). There's no response to poorly-whistled 2600, nor response to touch tone. No, neither of these really surprise me, but... One can only hope at times.

I want to say this number is something, and I'm beginning to wonder if it's not the switch recording I've been looking for, but broken.

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wvdial is for dial-up internet; it won't let you interact with anything. It's designed to push bits into a PPP daemon. If you want to play with a modem, you just need something that emulates a serial terminal; that's what Minicom does. If you happen to have anything else in your house that connects to your computer's serial port, like a Cisco router or a 5ESS, you'll probably notice that you can use the exact same software to interact with it.

 

With the exception of softmodems, a modem is a completely self-contained device. The terminal emulator is just responsible for send/receive bits from it. So you'll need to know a little bit about the Hayes command set to interact with it, what serial port (or virtual serial port if it's USB. Though beware that most USB modems are soft or host controlled modems. It's not a big deal, but they can be a pain to get running under Linux) it's assigned to, and you're basically set.

 

If you're still shopping around, you might want to consider getting a US Robotics Courier. They're pretty cheap on eBay, and among the best modems out there.

I have a Trendnet TFM-561U usb modem. It works perfectly on windows, but i can't get it working easy on linux. However it is supposedly compatible. So maybe i will get this working.

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Nice! If you want to test it, 800-877-0282 is some kind of railroad system. Nothing that can be changed around, but lots of random train info, and stuff from weather stations. One last thing - if you see it leave random characters on your screen, that's not a problem with your modem; the thing on the distant end doesn't clear the borders it draws.

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Nice! If you want to test it, 800-877-0282 is some kind of railroad system. Nothing that can be changed around, but lots of random train info, and stuff from weather stations. One last thing - if you see it leave random characters on your screen, that's not a problem with your modem; the thing on the distant end doesn't clear the borders it draws.

Sometimes i connect and it just says Connect 115200. What does that mean? My baud rate?

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Your modem is printing that; it just means that a connection is established to the distant modem. 115200 is the baud rate to your local modem. Sometimes you can get more detailed result codes by giving the modem a command like ATX4. Though this'll also turn on dial, ring and busy tone detection, which depending on what you're using your modem for, can be kind of annoying.

 

If it isn't responding, try pressing enter or one of the arrow keys.

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Your modem is printing that; it just means that a connection is established to the distant modem. 115200 is the baud rate to your local modem. Sometimes you can get more detailed result codes by giving the modem a command like ATX4. Though this'll also turn on dial, ring and busy tone detection, which depending on what you're using your modem for, can be kind of annoying.

 

If it isn't responding, try pressing enter or one of the arrow keys.

Thanks i'm rather new to dialup.

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