d3crypt

Some numbers (new)

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Oh by the way-- an inter box is a VERY useful thing to have on your line. Which, chances are, Mr. Doorbell probably used to make at least some of his recordings. I have yet to meet a phreak around here who doesn't have at least one inter box.

 

... So I'll bite. What's an inter box? Heh.

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It's a device that you connect between your line and the (usually) microphone input on a tape recorder or sound card. Lots of times they will also have controllers in them that can turn the tape recorder on and off when the phone is picked up and hung up. Put one on your line and you can record your exploitexplorations for posterity (and monitor your line when the phone's hung up, which can sometimes be interesting.) If you connect the microphone jack of an inter box to a device with a headphone output, you can backfeed your line with it (Muzak-on-hold, anybody?)

Rat $hack sells them (a "Phone Line Recorder Control" or some weird name like that) for about $30 or you can build your own for about that much.

==============================================

Inter Box
Meeko Box
(Multi-purpose Line Interface)

This box gets very high marks from this reviewer.

It is a fully-isolated interface to the line that will let you play or hear
audio on the line whether it is on or off hook and makes the ring signal
actuate a switch you can use to operate devices. It's unique among "phreak"
boxes in that it claims to be - and apparently is - FCC Part 68 Compliant!
What this means is that not only is it technically legal, but it is pretty
much guaranteed not to blow up your audio devices when the phone rings.

The FCC Part 68 Interface has been documented in electronics magazines such
as Radio-Electronics, and in many books and public sources. Why it isn't a
staple of phreak box philes should be a mystery but it's not. Most text
file authors never actually build the boxes they're describing, or write
about things they did to their phone lines that were completely
ill-advised. Pure intellectual laziness.

When just about any of the other boxes in this file are interfaced to the
line through the Inter Box, chances are they will start to work when they
didn't before!

Hats off to Sovereigns of Bell for putting out a refreshingly real file!

The Meeko Box is similar, but it doesn't claim to be, and isn't, a Part
68 interface. It is, however, more or less properly isolated from the
line and simpler to build.

Plausibility: 100 percent plausible.

Obsolescence: 100 percent current.

Skill: Construction is a little more difficult than a lot of "boxes" but the result is well worth it, as other line-gadget boxes are often sure to disappoint.

Risks: Not only completely legal, but FCC approved!

(by The Fixer)

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Nice... I could be convinced to be bored enough to make one one of these days. Heh.

Edited by JCSwishMan33
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She kind of sounds like that "Cornbreath" lady who started doing intercept recordings in the '70s.

 

Mmm, yeah, a little. If you press 0 at that VMS, you can hear her reading the help menu in some kind of soft spoken half-whisper. It's kinda like hearing your grandma trying to act sensual :wacko: .

 

 

 

Now, according to Windstream's site, they'll offer me all the bells and whistles for home phone service for $45 a month... But something tells me I don't need it all. Is there stuff I should / shouldn't ask for (like, I don't know, All-Call Blocking)?

 

That depends on how much they're charging per feature and what you think you'll be doing. After a certain number of them, the everything package just ends up costing less. Three-way calling and caller-id are probably the best value of the bunch. scratchytcarrier is right, though. The features save some headaches - especially three-way, but you can really get by without them.

 

I will say there is a thing you can do in the former Qwest parts of Centurylink territory (not Ohio, sadly) where you can order a call screening IVR. Usually what happens is your switch will just forward people who call you with a privacy bit present to a recording saying you don't accept unidentified calls. For whatever reason, Qwest decided to one-up this feature, and made an IVR that allows you to enter the number you're calling from manually. The catch being that it'd tell the switch to send priority ringing to the called party, and put a * in front of some generic CNAM to let them know the number was entered manually. But with call forwarding, the switch replaces both of those entries with what normally comes out when you dial a call, and pass whatever number you entered as CPN (basically, the first ANI field; the one caller-ID is derived from) normally.

 

The caveat to that is the second ANI field (charge number; users generally don't see this one) is passed as your number, and there's also a field passed that indicates the call was forwarded, and that it was forwarded from your number (users don't see this either, but GSM users will see that the call was forwarded. Not where from, though). So it's not a strong form of anomyity, but if Windstream has a call screening IVR that lets you enter your own number, there's a good chance you can use it for simple spoofing.

 

Anyway, if they're offering you unlimited long distance, it might be worth asking them which network they're putting you on; Windstream has at least three seperate long distance networks from companies they've bought. The Paetec network is quite good. McleodUSA and Nuvox's networks...not so much.

 

 

 

Kinda bizarre one I found on my old college's exchange... Tried the "add one to the MW test" trick.

 

Sorry, I didn't explain that very well. I meant one up from that particular milliwatt; in Ohio, the verification recording I gave out is on -9884 on most exchanges. Or at least I think. It's definitely a thing in at least some offices; 216-921-9884. I couldn't find anything on 9884 that didn't give me a reorder on the switch you pointed out.

 

 

 

216-397-0833 - This starts out with one ring, then a single run of the standard "number disconnected" recording. It then goes to reorder... Which trips after about a half-second into a standard ring, a total of 5 of them. At that point, the line sounds like it supes, then nothing but silence (with faint background hiss) for about 45 seconds before going to reorder again. I didn't try talking on it or anything of the sort because my little guy and wife were around

 

Assuming Time Warner Cable has a normal permanent signal recording, that might be the magic of least cost routing at work. The switch playing that recording just hangs up after the reorder is finished. But a lot of the smaller long distance carriers will do this thing where they'll start cycling through routes if the call is ended with a cause code saying all circuits are busy or the route is unavailable or something. Basically, since the smaller ones buy minutes from other carriers, the switch responsible for terminating long distance traffic will assume there's a problem with the route, and try the next one on the list. Some of them, as this one might be in your case, will superimpose fake ring over a call before it supes or trying different routes when the call ends normally and doesn't supe.

 

If you want to hear an extreme example of all this, try calling 202-484-0000. Literally all that number does is play three bursts of dialtone, and end the call with some kind of congestion related cause code. Whatever happens next is up to your long distance carrier.

 

 

 

Rat $hack sells them (a "Phone Line Recorder Control" or some weird name like that) for about $30 or you can build your own for about that much.

 

You can seriously cheap out on those if you want. With a 2500 set or something, you can get better results then a lot of those in-line recording adapters by hacking up a handset cord, putting some resistance between the transmit leads, and plugging a recorder straight into the handset leads. Or put an isolation transformer in there if you're connecting to something with an AC power source.

 

EDIT: Sorry, I'm a little sleepy, so I didn't quite catch this one.

 

 

 

So for example you might have 1010288 (AT$T) programmed in memory #1 so you'd just push that then dial say 1 206 958-1050 manually*

 

I think they have per minute long distance plans without a monthly fee, but doesn't AT&T charge some insane rate for casual dialed traffic?

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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Some things on the last post there, TP...

 

So here's how my particular phone (through TWC) handles permanent signal: Pick up phone, 15 seconds of dial tone, 30 seconds of reorder, 60 seconds of off-hook tone, with about a second or so between each... After that is just silent termination. I let it sit in that condition for about 3 minutes, just to make sure I wasn't missing anything. So there's no actual recording at any point.

 

I tried that 202 number you suggested... I get the 3 broken dial tones (like the ones I get when I have voicemail on my line), then the line kicks into a ringing state for one ring, then a reorder for about 30 seconds. The reorder ends with an audible 'click', then about a half-second later the line seems to drop into the permanent signal pattern starting with the 30 second reorder, off-hook, so on.

 

Revisited my 216-397 number from last night... Found that the silent point after the 5 rings was 30 seconds, then dropped me into the permanent signal pattern at the reorder.

 

Trying to dig up some kludge of equipment to test my wall jacks and see if they're 'live'; I'd just pull my current phone out of my cable setup, but my cell phone was KIA, so... Need to have something available.

 

EDIT: Oh, also... I know the 'one off of MW' wasn't a tried-and-true thing that you were saying. :) I've just learned that special stuff tends to clump in one area, so I figured that maybe going around -any- MW might produce some results.

Edited by JCSwishMan33
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You can seriously cheap out on those if you want. With a 2500 set or something, you can get better results then a lot of those in-line recording adapters by hacking up a handset cord, putting some resistance between the transmit leads, and plugging a recorder straight into the handset leads.

Yeah but then you can't monitor your line when it's on-hook (which can sometimes be interesting in itself) because the audio cuts back off when you hang up. Unless, say, you rewired an old 500 set to always stay on-hook, then I suppose it might work. (hint: disconnect the dial from either the F or RR terminal (doesn't matter which) and put a on-off switch between it and the dial!) But an in-line inter box was how I found out that ORCHWA01DS0 still has its old ringing generator left over from step days, complete with the old "city ring" superimposed.

By the way, Radio $hack also has that particular type of inter box...

I think they have per minute long distance plans without a monthly fee, but doesn't AT&T charge some insane rate for casual dialed traffic?

I don't believe so, but I'd have to look at my last phone bill when I made a bunch of LD calls using 0288 (about a year ago, when the access tandem article came out in 2600.) But I'm fairly sure it was something like $0.05/minute. Stay tuned.

(I really only used 0288 as an example in my earlier post because it's very well-known.)

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If you want to get the absolute lowest price for telephone service, you want "metered service" or "message rate service".  This is not offered in all areas, and it might not be what you really want.  In my area, it cannot be ordered (and is not offered) online, it must be ordered over the phone, and it comes out to about $14 after taxes.  Essentially, that price only gives you a dial tone, and you are charged for every local call you make.  Think of it like a pay phone.  In my area, most local calls are also timed on message rate service, so you don't pay per-call, you pay for the amount of time you talk in 3 or 5 minute increments.  If you make a lot of calls, the cost can get out of hand quickly.  However, if you only make a few calls per month, or call lots of numbers that don't answer, it might be a good option.  Metered service is sometimes available with or without an allowance.  In my area, the service without an allowance is cheapest, but if you pay $3 extra, you get an allowence of about $5.  It can save you money if you make more than $3 of calls.  It makes sense if you want a line primarily to receive calls, but you really need to do the math to make sure it's a good option for placing lots of calls.

 

Just to repeat, phone pricing is controlled by each state and as a result, pricing is not consistent nationwide.  In my state, prices vary city-to-city, so the only way to find out what's available is to call the phone company and ask them.  In PA, they are legally obligated to tell you all of your options starting with the lowest, but they tend to do so only if you say something like "please tell me the pricing options for telephone service starting with the cheapest".

 

If money isn't an object, just get the bundle!

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Sadly money is only an object because the wife is already paying for the TWC bundle... With the home phone service included. Heh.

 

I'd just be looking for the phone line to do my dialing on, so I don't possibly botch up our actual line. Military service has made me paranoid, and not without reason. ;)

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+1 360 696 9914 (5E) - rings once then goes to ~1255 Hz tone

 

So I found one of those calling a post office in rural Arizona of all things! 520-387-6602. Quite a surprise when you're just looking for a ringing number. I'm thinking this might be a 300 baud modem in some kind of reverse answer mode. If you've ever listened to the handshake for one, one end of the carrier is 2200 hz, and the other is the ~1255 hz tone these answer with.

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+1 360 696 9914 (5E) - rings once then goes to ~1255 Hz tone

 

So I found one of those calling a post office in rural Arizona of all things! 520-387-6602. Quite a surprise when you're just looking for a ringing number. I'm thinking this might be a 300 baud modem in some kind of reverse answer mode. If you've ever listened to the handshake for one, one end of the carrier is 2200 hz, and the other is the ~1255 hz tone these answer with.

 

I called there and got a post office. Dafuk...

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Yeah, you have to wait until after hours to get it. So after 4:30ish mountain time?

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Yeah, you have to wait until after hours to get it. So after 4:30ish mountain time?

I was like oh shit, "ugh wrong number". So there is really a carrier?

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Is it typical for a switch to have 2 slightly differing MW test numbers?

440-333-9882 and 9883 are both MW numbers, but 9883 has a 9 second on, 1 second off pattern ad infinitum, while 9882 is just 6 seconds on, then silence.

Also, 440-333-9886: "Please enter the 7 digit telephone number to forward, followed by your PIN number. Telephone number to forward, followed by your PIN number." Not sure if the second part is intentional, or some sort of recording quirk, because it almost sounds like it just went back to that part in the original statement.

No, i did not enter a number, nor a PIN. Yet.

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A few more...

So I found out that the CO that serves my current Exchange (309) also serves 307 and 355. By my research, it's a NorTel DMS-10, but the switch type may be incorrect; I didn't have many CLLI searches to go off of. It's apparently owned by Arch Wireless (307) and Alltel both, with a MW (6 second) on 355-9882.

Trying 9883 gives me another 9 seconds on, 1 second off MW... As does 9884, where I was hoping to find the verification recording.

309-9884 doesn't work... But the subscriber's outgoing VM message is humorous.

307-9884 is a "call can't be completed as dialed" recording with no SIT, which I find odd, but might just be me.

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By my research, it's a NorTel DMS-10, but the switch type may be incorrect; I didn't have many CLLI searches to go off of

ELYROHXAPS0.

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Funny enough, that's not the CLLI for my exchange, according to the site I checked:

440309 - LGRNOHXA355

Mind if I ask where you got your info?

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He may be right. https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail?npa=440&exchange=309

 

So earlier in IRC, we were using another listing tool (with data from 2008 to be fair) that said LGRNOHXA355 served 440-309. Aside from some weird data that doesn't look accurate (Verizon Wireless and Time Warner thousand blocks assigned to it), Telcodata seems to think that switch only serves 440-355.

 

So earlier, we found an ANAC on the other switch; 440-355-9885. If you make a dialing error or call an out of region toll-free number (800-555-5555), do you get that same voice? If not, can you record what you do get?

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I think the TelcoData data may be less weird, and more useful, than we think:

1) The thousands group listed there (309-4) does actually coorespond to the fact that the service I'm using is indeed through TWC... But oddly, no CLLI is listed. Everything has to go through somewhere, right?

2) Pulling up the info for both CLLIs... The Elyria switch (ELYROHXAPS0) has nothing listed for it, other than the fact that Windstream is served from it out of the 309 exchange. The LaGrange switch (LGRNOHXA355) has the 3 exchanges (including 309), the companies that are served out of it (to include TWC), and actual switch data labelling it as a NorTel DMS-10, etc.

It makes me wonder if that Elyria switch might not be a remote or "virtualized" switch that homes on LaGrange. Also leads me to believe that TelcoData might be a good resource, save for a lack of listing possible test numbers.

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At least as far as regulatory stuff goes, the packet switches do seem to be real. There's PUC documents out there where that talk about Windstream trying to assign only a single thousand block to them. The only thing they say about them is they're part of a "broadband initiative program". In most cases, that would be simple enough; it's a packet switch and that's that. Not here, though.

 

Generally speaking, they react to not in service numbers differently from the existing switch, but more often then not, you'll get a recording that's clearly coming from the circuit switch in the same (or a nearby) building. If that isn't strange enough, it's really hard to find working numbers in them but the few I've found are clearly being served out of the existing switch. This might just have something to do with the thousand block being ported in from an old exchange on the existing switch, though.

 

So, yeah. I remember looking at this with Jman a few years ago, and being equally confused. So it's up to you to help shed some light on this :) .

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Mind if I ask where you got your info?

Telcodata.

Edited by scratchytcarrier
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I'll happily start running through this particular switch to see what's there, trying to bother as few people as possible. Heh. :)

Basically at this point, I need to get a general plan together. -XXXX numbers that tend to drop info, tests, etc., special quirks about the DMS-10s to look for, maybe outside numbers to test against for differences.

I know some of this has been put out there throughout the forum, but I want to gather everything in one spot to have offline... Especially if I do any wandering around this holiday season. I won't say "phone trip", because who knows if I'll actually be going anywhere. Heh.

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Anyone have any ideas on how to find cool numbers in it, besides wardialing?

 

Just the usual scanning routine. My guess would be it's in one of those 00xx ranges. 818-907-0037 gave me one of the recordings on your switch, but that range (and the rest, sadly) seem to be crowded with a lot of people. If you just want to go all out and scan the hell out of it, I'd either do a search for the numbers as you're scanning or do it during business hours when people are working again to avoid them.

 

 

 

Basically at this point, I need to get a general plan together. -XXXX numbers that tend to drop info, tests, etc., special quirks about the DMS-10s to look for, maybe outside numbers to test against for differences.

 

Do you get that AIS we talked about when you make dialing errors or call out of region toll-free numbers and stuff? I'm not sure what's up with that prefix, but it'd be cool to establish that you're actually being served by the DMS-10 first :) .

 

EDIT: I don't know a whole lot about DMS-10s, but there's one in the Evan Doorbell Permanent Signal tape. Some of them seem to have a weird sounding offhook tone.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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