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redshift

Who's got Cellular questions

6 posts in this topic

Hello All.

I am new to these forums but have been looking at the post for a little while.

I have notice that there is not a whole lot of talk about cellular devices or the network in which they communicate on. Cellular technology is what some would call my area of focus. I just wanted to start a thread where people can ask questions about the cellular network or devices and everyone can come together and answer the questions others my have.

Remember, I do not clam to have all the answers or even most of them, I come here like most of you to learn and share with other so we may all learn from each others. I hope this thread gets utilized and help answer peoples questions.

tl;dr

I am new.

Here is a thread for questions about cellular anything.

I do not have all the answers.

Hope this thread gets utilized.

I hope this gets more people excited about cellular networks and devices.

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I have a question.

When sending an SMS, how does your carrier determine how long to store the SMS if it cannot be delivered?

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I have a question.

When sending an SMS, how does your carrier determine how long to store the SMS if it cannot be delivered?

I think Verizon uses either 7 or 10 days. (Failure to deliver results in a notification to the sender.) I'm pretty sure it's just a company policy thing; they pick a reasonable amount of time and set the clock when a message hits the mail room.

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I have a question.

When sending an SMS, how does your carrier determine how long to store the SMS if it cannot be delivered?

I think Verizon uses either 7 or 10 days. (Failure to deliver results in a notification to the sender.) I'm pretty sure it's just a company policy thing; they pick a reasonable amount of time and set the clock when a message hits the mail room.

Correct. Carriers make a business decision to limit the storage time of pending SMSes. They're stored in the SMS database of the receiving carrier. I don't know of an actual technical limit, and I suspect it depends mostly on the amount of disk installed in the database.

Interesting, I didn't know that Verizon sends a notification back on failed delivery. Do you know if any other carriers do it?

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In general, how do calls get routed? do they still go through a switch like a DMS-100 at a CO?

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I can't speak for other areas, but the MTSOs that Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon use in my area are 5ESSes. AT&T Wireless uses something different. I think they might put you on something else if you request 4G service. I haven't played around with the cellular networks much, but T-Mobile has a weird way of routing toll-frees. If you're not calling an AT&T toll-free, the call will spill out (at least from here) somewhere in California. Why they do this is anyone's guess, I've seen AT&T 1+ trunks accept toll-free before. In a way, though, it makes sense since they use AT&T for long distance.

EDIT: I'm talking out of my ass here - someone can probably explain this a lot better than I can, but I think in California the toll-free compensation rate is higher on most carriers. This could have something to do with it.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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