johnnymanson

Ham Radio Licenses at an all time high.

7 posts in this topic

That is an interesting article. It was only this Spring that AARL was lamenting the fact that the internet was the cause of people losing interest in ham radio. It would be interesting to see the number they quote as a percentage of the eligible population.

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You'll notice in the comments of that article, someone mentions the fact that it's much easier to meet people all over the world via the internet. In one sense that is true. However, that is directed communication. Though there are some websites that have random connections set up between users (e.g. chat roulette), most communication is mediated. Radio is more instantaneous and random. You don't know who is going to hear you and who you will hear.

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You'll notice in the comments of that article, someone mentions the fact that it's much easier to meet people all over the world via the internet. In one sense that is true. However, that is directed communication. Though there are some websites that have random connections set up between users (e.g. chat roulette), most communication is mediated. Radio is more instantaneous and random. You don't know who is going to hear you and who you will hear.

damn this thread is making me feel lazy... i have wanted to get into HAM stuff for at least the last 2 years... had a study book.. the CW requirement for anything other than a basic license turned me off at first, but AFAIK it has been removed...

I do not have any way to mount an antenna (live in an apartment)... would I have any chance at DX with a portable? In NYC? seems that there would be too much RF noise to be able to DX from within NYC with a portable.

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The down side to getting your license is you will be on yet another government list. In the US the FAA requires your SSN which is bollocks. Call me paranoid ... ;-)

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I do not have any way to mount an antenna (live in an apartment)... would I have any chance at DX with a portable? In NYC? seems that there would be too much RF noise to be able to DX from within NYC with a portable.

There is a friend of mine and former NYC2600 member from back in the day who has his ham ticket and lives in an apartment up in Spanish Harlem. He runs HF mobile with a SGC SG-2020, and gets out really well with nothing more than 20 watts and an Outbacker whip. When he's done, he unscrews the antenna from his car and takes the radio out. He also runs the antenna out his apartment window with a counterpoise.

Then you have Diana Eng KC2UHB (from MakeZine), who does portable VHF/UHF satellite ops in Manhattan.

satelliteyagi.jpg?w=600&h=800

That rig is a Yaesu FT-817ND, with a WA5VJB "cheap yagi."

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The sad and inconvenient reality is, the bulk are either preppers who'll never actually use it, or inactive and probably won't ever get back into the hobby. If the "Newington Yankees" were halfway intelligent they'd give yearly statistics instead of one big vague number they just got probably by totaling all the entries in the FCC database, then we can really see how low this "all time high" really is. But they don't, since that would require integrity and honesty. Status is most of the ARRL's reason for being anymore and gets them new adherants (read: money). It's more convenient for their political agenda to state 700000 enrollees and not bother stating that this figure is over an aggregate fifty-year period, which sounds more "impressive" to the weak-minded than, gee, only 150 people bothered to get their tickets in 2015? Of course honesty would challenge the way people think about the ham radio religion, which just simply isn't permissible for one reason or other.

I'd gamble that out of that "more than 700000" in 2011 maybe only about 8% have even keyed down once in the past 4 1/2 years, which is probably a pretty liberal estimate too. Everybody who's anyone anymore is working 151/462/467 MHz on opened up foxtrot-tango-6-0-romeos anyways, or so I've heard *wink*

In the US the FAA requires your SSN which is bollocks.



I assume you mean FCC. Just leave it blank or give them your state code and pad the rest out with zeroes, which was what I did and it worked. Legally nobody is entitled to that information except the IR$, your employer (debatable) and the social security department. If the FCC tries to "challenge" it later on it's your right as an American to tell them to F off since a ham ticket isn't paying tax or filing a W2 or (gasp, shock) social security. As a division of the United States Federal Government Co. Inc. the FCC hardly has enough staff or funding as it is to worry about it so they probably won't even bother.

You are also within your right to use an alias (or nickname) and or a PO box, which many do.

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