ThoughtPhreaker

The death of Livengood

16 posts in this topic

907-295-0000. 'nuff said...

It looks like Jim River Camp (907-541) followed, too.

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Damn. Do you know when the system was retired? I used to be in a habit of calling Livengood a few times a week, but I haven't called since the end of December or early January.

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Pretty recently I think. Since these both died at about the same time, it's very well possible Alascom had a hand in it; they both home off the same tandem (ANCRAKZA04T). I'm thinking they might've gone to United Utilities and Bettles Telephone and just went "okay, guys, no more antique phones. Get that stuff out of there."

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That sucks... weren't these pretty much the last analog 2600 Hz controlled trunks out there?

You can still reach the recording, and it still supes - just sounds very clean... too clean... :(

Edited by dmine45
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That sucks... weren't these pretty much the last analog 2600 Hz controlled trunks out there?

You can still reach the recording, and it still supes - just sounds very clean... too clean... :(

As far as I know, they were the last ones in the US.

There's some records and CD's I've been listening to so many times that I remember all of their skips and pops. Every time I hear those recordings on the radio or at somebody's house, I'll "hear" the pop or skip in its expected place even though it's not there. A similar phenomenon occurs when I call a disconnected number in Livengood. I still hear a 2600Hz "cheep" at the end of the recording, even though it's not there. I'll never be able to hear that recording without placing a wink of 2600Hz at the end.

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I'm really surprised it lasted this long. Back in 2006, I was so sure it was on it's last legs that I made every effort I could to take advantage of it. If you listened closely, though, it was obvious someone was still caring for it. There were trunks that were broken or screwy sounding that would sound great later. If someone (presumably) hadn't stepped in, there might've been a chance the system could've lasted until it broke. We should email the company and ask what happened.

Anywho, we all knew this day had to come. So in 2009, I got the closest I could get to a perfect sample of the carrier systems. There was a strange thing you could do with the Jim River Camp trunks where on a call that wasn't suped, if you whistled 2600 quietly enough, it would just go silent - the trunk wouldn't wink or anything, it would just do nothing. It didn't work when I made this recording, but after the trunk winked, the reorder stopped anyway.

http://thoughtphreaker.omghax.ca/audio/jrc.flac

On Livengood, I was just lazy and let a busy signal time out to silence.

http://thoughtphreaker.omghax..ca/audio/liv1.flac

http://thoughtphreaker.omghax.ca/audio/liv2.flac

Expect recordings with more goings on in them soon. If you happen to have any, please add yours.

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LAME! TP I'll see if I have any recording laying around. Need to get with you soon about a few projects I've been working on.

Thanks for sharing your recordings.

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This whole exchange is goign to need to be rescanned.. Even the sensaphone unit isnt in place anylonger. grr

Actually I have a pretty leet scanner context for asterisk that works really well I'm about to give out.

To name a few of the functions, it has random trunk selection, random callerid selection, different modes of scanning (nxx scanning, line scanning and autodial scanning (yuck)) - so it still has the appeal to the OCD (liek me) but takes out the digits we don't really need to use. The best thing of all, it supports multiple users as well as it's a feature code to toggle on/off. Varibles get saved on the fly when you dial 10 digits then afterwards depending upon which mode you;re in you just dial the nxx or line.

This scanner came into light when we were going through the projekt ak (that never got finished lol)

peace peace

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The NIS recording still supervises, so expect to pay through the nose to dial all 10,000 numbers. In any case, if you find someone who doesn't bill you on a per minute basis, this might all just be a grey area to be sorted out by whoever pays USF fees.

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Well now that Livengood is gone does anyone have any foreign numbers that are still on C5?

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Bleah, I had a good reply for this, but I hit the refresh button on accident >.<

So here's an abbreviated version;

Livengood was R1, not C5. C5 definitely exists though, but the numbers aren't just few and far between. Unlike the Livengoods of the world, where you just have access to the incoming trunk group, fraud is a very real threat to them, so the fraud detection equipment is usually very keen to catch these things. Especially these days, when black routes come and go like bad fads. So start scanning, and when you do, start doing your homework on the way these circuits work.

R1, possibly R2, and it's variants still continue to live on in other places. Russia actually has their own little bizarre MF system set up. I might cover this later, depending on how people feel about this. Here in the states, it's actually used a lot more than you'd think. The only problem is, it's inband signaling over T-carrier circuits, so the supervision is all out of band. If you can find a way to fool these switches into thinking the trunk has reset though, certainly more power to you. Switch bugs of all kinds are out there - I've covered a few here in past posts.

As for things that don't use it for inter-office signaling, those are around too. Take this ANAC for example; 503-697-0053. The second it goes offhook, it expects keypulse, three, seven MF digits, and then a start. If you decide to send this, be sure to make it fairly loud. The ANAC can be a little picky.

And then there's this; 419-646-2368. As far as I can tell, this is the last AIS out there that'll let you hear MF digits like this. Anybody up for a phone trip? :)

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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Bleah, I had a good reply for this, but I hit the refresh button on accident >.<

So here's an abbreviated version;

Livengood was R1, not C5. C5 definitely exists though, but the numbers aren't just few and far between. Unlike the Livengoods of the world, where you just have access to the incoming trunk group, fraud is a very real threat to them, so the fraud detection equipment is usually very keen to catch these things. Especially these days, when black routes come and go like bad fads. So start scanning, and when you do, start doing your homework on the way these circuits work.

R1, possibly R2, and it's variants still continue to live on in other places. Russia actually has their own little bizarre MF system set up. I might cover this later, depending on how people feel about this. Here in the states, it's actually used a lot more than you'd think. The only problem is, it's inband signaling over T-carrier circuits, so the supervision is all out of band. If you can find a way to fool these switches into thinking the trunk has reset though, certainly more power to you. Switch bugs of all kinds are out there - I've covered a few here in past posts.

As for things that don't use it for inter-office signaling, those are around too. Take this ANAC for example; 503-697-0053. The second it goes offhook, it expects keypulse, three, seven MF digits, and then a start. If you decide to send this, be sure to make it fairly loud. The ANAC can be a little picky.

And then there's this; 419-646-2368. As far as I can tell, this is the last AIS out there that'll let you hear MF digits like this. Anybody up for a phone trip? :)

Thanks for clarifying, I am still new to the phreaking world. Would you happen to have a link to where I could learn more about R1?

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R1 is pretty simple; it's the classic protocol you hear in the phonetrips tapes. Basically, there's one seize command (3700 hz, 2600 hz, 1600 hz, some manner of bitrobbedness, or some high tech sorcery involving voltage, depending on the carrier system type), and the very standard set of MFs we know and love.

So a classic example of this would be, say, dialing a supervision test on a 2600-controlled circuit;

http://thoughtphreaker.omghax.ca/r1_supetest.flac

In this case, it's seize, KP, 1103, ST, and then the call begins.

So KP + number + ST is relatively standard, but there's tons of equipment out there that wants something else. There's even an extension for using carrier access codes and ANI-II digits over it.

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Bleah, I had a good reply for this, but I hit the refresh button on accident >.<

So here's an abbreviated version;

Livengood was R1, not C5. C5 definitely exists though, but the numbers aren't just few and far between. Unlike the Livengoods of the world, where you just have access to the incoming trunk group, fraud is a very real threat to them, so the fraud detection equipment is usually very keen to catch these things. Especially these days, when black routes come and go like bad fads. So start scanning, and when you do, start doing your homework on the way these circuits work.

R1, possibly R2, and it's variants still continue to live on in other places. Russia actually has their own little bizarre MF system set up. I might cover this later, depending on how people feel about this. Here in the states, it's actually used a lot more than you'd think. The only problem is, it's inband signaling over T-carrier circuits, so the supervision is all out of band. If you can find a way to fool these switches into thinking the trunk has reset though, certainly more power to you. Switch bugs of all kinds are out there - I've covered a few here in past posts.

As for things that don't use it for inter-office signaling, those are around too. Take this ANAC for example; 503-697-0053. The second it goes offhook, it expects keypulse, three, seven MF digits, and then a start. If you decide to send this, be sure to make it fairly loud. The ANAC can be a little picky.

And then there's this; 419-646-2368. As far as I can tell, this is the last AIS out there that'll let you hear MF digits like this. Anybody up for a phone trip? :)

I just called 419-646-2368. still the same, but there is this strange robotic voice in the background before, between and after the recordings. am I crazy, or do you hear that too?

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Bleah, I had a good reply for this, but I hit the refresh button on accident >.<

So here's an abbreviated version;

Livengood was R1, not C5. C5 definitely exists though, but the numbers aren't just few and far between. Unlike the Livengoods of the world, where you just have access to the incoming trunk group, fraud is a very real threat to them, so the fraud detection equipment is usually very keen to catch these things. Especially these days, when black routes come and go like bad fads. So start scanning, and when you do, start doing your homework on the way these circuits work.

R1, possibly R2, and it's variants still continue to live on in other places. Russia actually has their own little bizarre MF system set up. I might cover this later, depending on how people feel about this. Here in the states, it's actually used a lot more than you'd think. The only problem is, it's inband signaling over T-carrier circuits, so the supervision is all out of band. If you can find a way to fool these switches into thinking the trunk has reset though, certainly more power to you. Switch bugs of all kinds are out there - I've covered a few here in past posts.

As for things that don't use it for inter-office signaling, those are around too. Take this ANAC for example; 503-697-0053. The second it goes offhook, it expects keypulse, three, seven MF digits, and then a start. If you decide to send this, be sure to make it fairly loud. The ANAC can be a little picky.

And then there's this; 419-646-2368. As far as I can tell, this is the last AIS out there that'll let you hear MF digits like this. Anybody up for a phone trip? :)

I just called 419-646-2368. still the same, but there is this strange robotic voice in the background before, between and after the recordings. am I crazy, or do you hear that too?

 

I know what you mean.  I don't hear it every time and also, it doesn't sound the same every time.  I think it's speech.  I doubt it is crosstalk from other calls to intercept.  I'm also hearing crosstalk on a ringing number.  Now that's peculiar.

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