AsteriskPhreak

Libya

9 posts in this topic

Supposedly all international calls have been shut out. Has anyone tried calling? Might be interesting to see what happens. I assume some sort of "all circuits are busy now" recording. In the US, I've heard recordings that are fairly descriptive in the past (from AT&T) saying such things as:

"Due to the earthquake/hurricane/flood/emergency situation in the area you are calling...."

AsteriskPhreak

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I can't find any articles that talk about telephone calls to Libya failing. Also, I got a foreign-sounding ring tone when I called a hotel, but I disconnected before they answered so I wouldn't be charged.

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"Due to the political uprising in the country you are calling..."

That'd be a cool message, we should get AT&T to put that on their 4Es.

For what it's worth, I tried making calls to a bunch of places in Libya, and just got a reorder from the US international gateway when trying to call outside of Tripoli. Given the circumstances, probably not a coincidence.

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Tried calling Libya today( just curious) and the call went through. It landed on an IVR though and I suspect the server was located somewhere not too close to the country (try EU), the calls to the Indian high commission in Libya are still working though, you will get a live person after about 2 minutes of IVR in most cases. Also heard that a few locals have started setting up makeshift exchanges to enable international communications.

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Tried calling Libya today( just curious) and the call went through. It landed on an IVR though and I suspect the server was located somewhere not too close to the country (try EU), the calls to the Indian high commission in Libya are still working though, you will get a live person after about 2 minutes of IVR in most cases. Also heard that a few locals have started setting up makeshift exchanges to enable international communications.

according to this Libyas internet is hooped at the moment:

http://regmedia.co.uk/2011/03/04/youtube_libya_traffic.png

youtube_libya_traffic.png

...but thats just their net

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Tried calling Libya today( just curious) and the call went through. It landed on an IVR though and I suspect the server was located somewhere not too close to the country (try EU), the calls to the Indian high commission in Libya are still working though, you will get a live person after about 2 minutes of IVR in most cases. Also heard that a few locals have started setting up makeshift exchanges to enable international communications.

according to this Libyas internet is hooped at the moment:

http://regmedia.co.uk/2011/03/04/youtube_libya_traffic.png

youtube_libya_traffic.png

...but thats just their net

What's the ivr you are referring?, i mean, what is it?. English isn't my main language and don't know what it could be regarding telecommunications.

Thanks in advance!!!

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Tried calling Libya today( just curious) and the call went through. It landed on an IVR though and I suspect the server was located somewhere not too close to the country (try EU), the calls to the Indian high commission in Libya are still working though, you will get a live person after about 2 minutes of IVR in most cases. Also heard that a few locals have started setting up makeshift exchanges to enable international communications.

according to this Libyas internet is hooped at the moment:

http://regmedia.co.uk/2011/03/04/youtube_libya_traffic.png

youtube_libya_traffic.png

...but thats just their net

What's the ivr you are referring?, i mean, what is it?. English isn't my main language and don't know what it could be regarding telecommunications.

Thanks in advance!!!

IVR is an Interactive Voice Response system. It lets the computer follow our commands based on the DTMF tones that we send. A good example would be when you call you mobile telephony operator's customer care and the first thing you usually hear is a recorded message that gives you options to press 1,2 or 3 on the keypad to access various menus.

Edited by ver_01
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Thanks for the explanation. Now it is clear.

Thanks!!!

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