JmanA9

What Happened to Verizon's AIS?

3 posts in this topic

Did anyone else notice that disconnected phone numbers in many Verizon states all go to a recording that says "The number you've dialed is not in service"? This new recording has taken the place of the AIS system that Verizon has been using for as long as I can remember. I've noticed the change in PA, NY, DE, VA, MD and DC. Interestingly, even though New York didn't ever have the AIS system that covered all of the other states. I believe the switchover occurred in early December. I've attached a recording of the old system for those unsure of what I'm talking about, or who aren't familiar with the system. Here's an example from each state, and you can see that they all sound a bit different.

PA - 412-856-0000

NY - 516-599-9999

DE - 302-366-9999

VA - 540-248-9998

MD - 301-206-9999

DC - 202-208-9998

The problem is that numbers that have a forwarding number listed also go to this system. I can't see why this switch was made, seeing as it gives less information to the customer.

Old Verizon AIS.mp3

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I was wondering about that myself. You can hear some rather interesting consequences of this on one of the numbers I posted in the some numbers thread.

You know what I think it is, though? I think the equipment might've died. Within the last year or two, my calls to it would randomly fail. Whenever I was scanning former Bell Atlantic/NYNEX exchanges, I'd always check CBCAD recordings and echo tests twice, since more often than not, it was just the AIS fudging the call.

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I was wondering about that myself. You can hear some rather interesting consequences of this on one of the numbers I posted in the some numbers thread.

You know what I think it is, though? I think the equipment might've died. Within the last year or two, my calls to it would randomly fail. Whenever I was scanning former Bell Atlantic/NYNEX exchanges, I'd always check CBCAD recordings and echo tests twice, since more often than not, it was just the AIS fudging the call.

I originally thought it died, but it might not be the case since New York never had this intercept system, but now they have the same recording that's now in places that ran the system. Or, maybe Verizon wants to standardize things. Could it really have been a centralized system for so many states?

Over the past year, I got a lot of busy signals instead of AIS reports. That never used to happen.

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