stacyprz

help me! plz

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can anyone decrypt this for me?

e262e07f06e6fcd2ee4523fb95bc12d8

and this?

0902bc1c3dc8ac9f8e5aaa7f20e1dcb5

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They look like the output of a "hashing" algorithm, like MD5. If that's the case, they can't be "decrypted." Hashing algorithms are one-way. The best you could do would be to try to find a collision (i.e. another input that resulted in the same output hash).

More info on MD5 here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5

Edited by rax
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They look like the output of a "hashing" algorithm, like MD5. If that's the case, they can't be "decrypted." Hashing algorithms are one-way. The best you could do would be to try to find a collision (i.e. another input that resulted in the same output hash).

More info on MD5 here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5

Oh ok....I just don't know anything about these things and that is what it is telling me to do. So how do I get the password from it?

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They look like the output of a "hashing" algorithm, like MD5. If that's the case, they can't be "decrypted." Hashing algorithms are one-way. The best you could do would be to try to find a collision (i.e. another input that resulted in the same output hash).

More info on MD5 here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5

Oh ok....I just don't know anything about these things and that is what it is telling me to do. So how do I get the password from it?

Try every possible combination until you get one that works…

Suppose you have a function f(x) and an inverse function f`(x), such that f`(f(n)) = n. MD5 is a one way hashing algorithm which means that it is believed that for f(x) being the MD5 function there exists no function f`(x) which reverses it and is also computationally easy.

It is possible to find the password by searching for a collision. That is, to try every possible (or a plausible subset of possible) input combinations and comparing them to the output. This can be done by cycling through all the possible letters/digits/symbols, using a wordlist, or being slightly more mathematically savvy about it and using a rainbow table (this pregenerates certain hash tables, then uses some really cool algorithms to search where in that keyspace the actual key is). Either way there is no avoiding the fact that there is no 'computationally easy' method of reversing an MD5 hash that is currently known. (There are known vulnerabilities in MD5, but no magic bullet. If you find one, there are definitely academic awards to be awarded and papers to be written)

Edited by n3xg3n
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They look like the output of a "hashing" algorithm, like MD5. If that's the case, they can't be "decrypted." Hashing algorithms are one-way. The best you could do would be to try to find a collision (i.e. another input that resulted in the same output hash).

More info on MD5 here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5

Oh ok....I just don't know anything about these things and that is what it is telling me to do. So how do I get the password from it?

Try every possible combination until you get one that works…

Suppose you have a function f(x) and an inverse function f`(x), such that f`(f(n)) = n. MD5 is a one way hashing algorithm which means that it is believed that for f(x) being the MD5 function there exists no function f`(x) which reverses it and is also computationally easy.

It is possible to find the password by searching for a collision. That is, to try every possible (or a plausible subset of possible) input combinations and comparing them to the output. This can be done by cycling through all the possible letters/digits/symbols, using a wordlist, or being slightly more mathematically savvy about it and using a rainbow table (this pregenerates certain hash tables, then uses some really cool algorithms to search where in that keyspace the actual key is). Either way there is no avoiding the fact that there is no 'computationally easy' method of reversing an MD5 hash that is currently known. (There are known vulnerabilities in MD5, but no magic bullet. If you find one, there are definitely academic awards to be awarded and papers to be written)

GREAT!!! lol....I don't know what you just said. I am not smart when it comes to things like this...that is why I asked for help. To see if someone could do it for me

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GREAT!!! lol....I don't know what you just said. I am not smart when it comes to things like this...that is why I asked for help. To see if someone could do it for me

That is not help. That is someone doing it for you. You got some pretty good help on what to read and then figure out what to do from there. Now you are asking someone to do it for you. Maybe you will get lucky and someone will have some time to do it for you, but don't hold your breath.

PS: If the hashes are salted, you are pretty much SOL.

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If your lazy, you could attempt to check it against some rainbow tables and see if anything has already been inputted into the database. just make sure you know what type of hashing it is. (If it is hashing)

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I'm not lazy or anything....I just don't know what the hell to do! that is y I asked for HELP! hello...y else would I?????

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Where did you get the hashes?

some web site online but they wanted me to pay like a crap load of money to get the password. so i decided to try this and see if someone could do it for me

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