bardolph

what it the most elegant looking linux distro ?

16 posts in this topic

have tried ubuntu and ku- and edu- and xu- but they all look rather poor...

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Really? I think the newest version looks very polished as did most of the previous versions. I keep hearing good things about mint Linux but if its the Desktop Environments you dont like then just find the Linux distro most suited to you and install new Desktop Environments until you find what you want.

The Enlightenment window manager has always looked quite nice, and when I tried E17 it seemed to be quite full featured (although I used it a while ago im sure it's improved by now) but I think, like with Windows, it'll take it a little tweaking to get any Desktop Environment to work well. Some just do better than others out of the box than other (looking at you BlackBox).

What didnt you like about the look?

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I've found some great looking skins for ubuntu it in google images, my only gripe is that webpages blow.

What were you using before?

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If think that you start to try all the linux distros that you found on the web, after that you can decide which one is the best for you and which one is better than the other.

First of all have a look at all the common Desktop Envirorments and there are too many and here i link you some names :

Fluxbox

Gnome

Kde

Xfce

But probably the best way to try it is to install a distro, perhaps on a virtual machine, and here try to install a series of Desktops Envirorments to have a more practice experience of them!! :)

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I get what he's saying. A lot of open source projects are designed in the engineer mindset, with little or no thought on end user design. GNOME is pretty powerful though, and I think it looks fantastic on Ubuntu. The upcoming version of Ubuntu's theme looks very good and I think it will be a big help for convincing people to give Linux a try.

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I get what he's saying. A lot of open source projects are designed in the engineer mindset, with little or no thought on end user design. GNOME is pretty powerful though, and I think it looks fantastic on Ubuntu. The upcoming version of Ubuntu's theme looks very good and I think it will be a big help for convincing people to give Linux a try.

Very true, especially a lot the the smaller/less well known apps, but hey, it's open source. Its always possible to make a new GUI. I hope that as more people move to open source more designers will be prepared to put in a little time to make things look pretty. Despite what I tell myself it is important. Things that look finished feel like they work better. It's already happening with Gnome/KDE et al but certain applications (OOo comes to mind) need a little tweaking.

I guess the problem is that as multiple WM exist it's hard to have a unified look.

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I get what he's saying. A lot of open source projects are designed in the engineer mindset, with little or no thought on end user design. GNOME is pretty powerful though, and I think it looks fantastic on Ubuntu. The upcoming version of Ubuntu's theme looks very good and I think it will be a big help for convincing people to give Linux a try.

Very true, especially a lot the the smaller/less well known apps, but hey, it's open source. Its always possible to make a new GUI. I hope that as more people move to open source more designers will be prepared to put in a little time to make things look pretty. Despite what I tell myself it is important. Things that look finished feel like they work better. It's already happening with Gnome/KDE et al but certain applications (OOo comes to mind) need a little tweaking.

I guess the problem is that as multiple WM exist it's hard to have a unified look.

Yeah, OpenOffice looks like Office 2000, and functions the same, too. That's one app that more work should be put into, because Office is a large part of what keeps small business on Windows.

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Pretty subjective question, as it's all a matter of opinion.

Me? I think GNOME kicks KDE's ass. I've found that Fedora looks real nice overall as a distro.

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Pretty subjective question, as it's all a matter of opinion.

Yeah, I second that...running Xubuntu on my laptop and it isn't the prettiest but then again it isn't why I installed it. My eye candy preferences give Mint a delicious taste but if you like Mint then you might like OpenSuse which has the same play on green as Mint but, in my opinion, is more robust with a large community. I use it as my linux server...I have two setups, one windows based and one linux based. Even the boards for OpenSuse play on the same aesthetic and in a weird way adds to the desktop experience by remaining consistent.

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I normally run(When using linux) slackware using KDE. It suits my needs, is stable, and looks nice enough for me.

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For linux I use Ubuntu with all the bells and whistles turned on, including compiz fusion and emerald. I've tweaked Emerald so that everything is in my customary "red on black" theme and cranked comiz fusion's "awesome" dial to 11, but it takes a pretty damn decent computer to pull all that off. For a mid-range system I'd say KDE4 looks pretty slick and for lower end systems try gOS.

From the non-linux side of the fence you could also try openSolaris, which is a little more business than pleasure, but it still looks quite polished. Then again my aesthetics are a little odd, I miss BeOS a lot... There are BeOS themes for Gnome and such but it's really not the same.

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For linux I use Ubuntu with all the bells and whistles turned on, including compiz fusion and emerald. I've tweaked Emerald so that everything is in my customary "red on black" theme and cranked comiz fusion's "awesome" dial to 11, but it takes a pretty damn decent computer to pull all that off. For a mid-range system I'd say KDE4 looks pretty slick and for lower end systems try gOS.

From the non-linux side of the fence you could also try openSolaris, which is a little more business than pleasure, but it still looks quite polished. Then again my aesthetics are a little odd, I miss BeOS a lot... There are BeOS themes for Gnome and such but it's really not the same.

yea i heard good things about opensolaris - actually i like business environment

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I don't find their newest changes particularly sexy yet, but I like that Ubuntu is at least TRYING to become much more polished and Mac-like.

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id have to say, crystal-fvwm, or astrumi(dist) still lighterweight than xfce and has transparency. i.e. they look fairly good without being slower than slowlaris like when you use ubuntu.

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Elegant is really in the eye of the beholder, so I would suggest trying a few of the more popular ones out in a VM. As previously stated, the WM/DEs can be changed, so you can achieve any look with any distro.

For me, minimalism is king, so I chose to give Crunchbang a try. It is based on Ubuntu with the Openbox WM, which makes it light and nimble. I have since switched to a tiling WM, Awesome in particular, and am loving the change.

If you're looking for elegance installed as default, I think Ubuntu 10.04, Mint, and OpenSUSE have the most 'modern' looking default setups.

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