nintendo1889

A Phreakbot web crawler? To find pbx exchanges

8 posts in this topic

I just had this light bulb go off, what about a web crawler bot that crawls the web looking either on the same domain or the same page for phone numbers in the same exchange, something that I do manually as I browse the web for non-phreaking purposes. For example, you're looking at a companies contact page and see their different offices are in the same exchange.

I guess the devil would be in the details as to how to actually go about the crawling, eg where to start? Perhaps have two different bots, one for crawling google for inurl:contact etc... and one that just starts on random pages, or perhaps at one of those business directories like zoominfo. Or dmoz. Or the yahoo directory (considering it's a paid-only directory now, it would likely lead to more businesses). Or as a start, to test the waters so to speak, just point it at specific preselected domains.

Also it seems like certain industries always use toll-free numbers which negates all of this (eg I've never found blocks of toll-free numbers from the same company together through wardialing. There's 800-alltel1 800-alltel2 etc... but I already knew those).

Obviously searching for 'areacode-001' 'areacode-002' etc... would be a shortcut but it wouldn't find the numbers listed as areacode001 and wouldn't find every instance of areacode.001 but would find some.

Anyone ever thought about this?

Edited by nintendo1889
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[quote name='nintendo1889' date='24 February 2010 - 11:55 AM' timestamp='1267030518' post='350667

Obviously searching for 'areacode-001' 'areacode-002' etc... would be a shortcut but it wouldn't find the numbers listed as areacode001 and wouldn't find every instance of areacode.001 but would find some.

Anyone ever thought about this?

you also forgot (NPA) Nxx-xxxx

i am not a programmer, i do not nesacarraly think it would be a quick and easy code, as there are variables as to how people type out numbers as you said...

NPA-Nxx-xxxx or NPA.Nxx.xxxx NPANxxxxxx, and the one you forgot (NPA)Nxx-xxxx

then there are the times when people put the 1 before the number....

i assume that a code that searches for a 10 digit number, or an 11 digit number starting with the number 1, ignores periods hyphens and dashes, then checks the first 3 digits against a database of actual NPA's

it could then be further customized to search for a specific NPA Nxx or every Nxx served by the same central office or rate center (if it was also able to access a database of each exchange within that central office)

seems like it would be a time consuming task for a programmer to come up with a script like this (although seems like it would likely be easier than a complex script for asterisk) but not too sure what the benefit of actually having or running a script like this would have...

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you also forgot (NPA) Nxx-xxxx

i am not a programmer, i do not nesacarraly think it would be a quick and easy code, as there are variables as to how people type out numbers as you said...

NPA-Nxx-xxxx or NPA.Nxx.xxxx NPANxxxxxx, and the one you forgot (NPA)Nxx-xxxx

then there are the times when people put the 1 before the number....

i assume that a code that searches for a 10 digit number, or an 11 digit number starting with the number 1, ignores periods hyphens and dashes, then checks the first 3 digits against a database of actual NPA's

it could then be further customized to search for a specific NPA Nxx or every Nxx served by the same central office or rate center (if it was also able to access a database of each exchange within that central office)

seems like it would be a time consuming task for a programmer to come up with a script like this (although seems like it would likely be easier than a complex script for asterisk) but not too sure what the benefit of actually having or running a script like this would have...

There are actually a fair amount of programatic tools that could be used to pattern match (perl, python, sed, etc. -- even OS specific ones such as OS X's NSScanner). Just write a bot, suck in the page and start scanning. It's an interesting idea. I'd be willing to contribute code to such a project.

Edited by Pan
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I have a printed phonebook (10 years old) of my city that includes information if PBX is present.

Golden source for phreaking.

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Havoc,

 

Can you explain this a little bit more?

 

I know if an office has multiple DIDs near another one, that's obviously a pbx.

 

 

I have a printed phonebook (10 years old) of my city that includes information if PBX is present.
Golden source for phreaking.

 

Edited by nintendo1889
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What do you need ? in my book it is listed as private exchange

 

 

Havoc,

 

Can you explain this a little bit more?

 

I know if an office has multiple DIDs near the others, that's obviously a pbx.

 

 

I have a printed phonebook (10 years old) of my city that includes information if PBX is present.
Golden source for phreaking.

 

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Interesting, I'll have to look for that. Is there a certain type of phonebook brand that has this? Eg: official AT&T/bell books, yellowbook, etc...?

 

 

 

 

What do you need ? in my book it is listed as private exchange

 

 

Havoc,

 

Can you explain this a little bit more?

 

I know if an office has multiple DIDs near the others, that's obviously a pbx.

 

 

I have a printed phonebook (10 years old) of my city that includes information if PBX is present.
Golden source for phreaking.

 

 

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I'm not sure if you noticed that I am reffering to Polish phone book from years.

I have no idea what would you find in US books.

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