howyadoin

Noob question - how can I install and execute a tar file ?

7 posts in this topic

The title says it all. This is a Linux question, which I forgot to say... sorry.

An example of what I recently tried to install was Firefox for Linux and Googled "how to" and nothing I tried worked. Various suggestions were explained which involved typing stuff into the terminal, but all of it failed.

Plus, another issue was that I was hoping to find the way to install and execute a program some other way than via the terminal, but found nada. I really don't want to do it via terminal commands (which failed for me anyway) - If only I could recall how I did it before when I had OpenSUSE 11, but I don't. Does anyone know the other way or ways to do this? If so, let me know. I have Debian 5.0.0 at the moment if this matters.

Thanks for any replies.

Edit : Added that this was a Linux question.

Edited by totallyAunti
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Untar it:

tar -zyxf firefox-3.5.5.tar.bz2

Then execute it:

firefox &

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Untar it:

tar -zyxf firefox-3.5.5.tar.bz2

Then execute it:

firefox &

Then execute it:

firefox &

?????? Is that what I actually type in to execute it, or was that a typo?

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No typo.

'firefox' from the tar is a shell script that checks your sym links and then executes 'run-mozilla.sh', which then runs 'firefox-bin'.

'&' tells the shell-script to run in the background.

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No typo.

'firefox' from the tar is a shell script that checks your sym links and then executes 'run-mozilla.sh', which then runs 'firefox-bin'.

'&' tells the shell-script to run in the background.

If you don't type the '&', when you closed the terminal it would kill the firefox process

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Thanx everybody but for some unknown reason firefox & doesn't work on Debian 5.0. No biggy though since I found the non-terminal solution myself (finally). I'll post it here in case someone else needs it and Googles for it :

-when downloading the tar file, choose to have it open in Archive Manager.

-in Archive Manager, be sure the file is highlighted then click the "Extract" button. As this point it opens a window where you can choose where to extract it to - choose where you want to keep your download programs at (personally, I made a desktop folder called "programs" for easy use).

-now just right-click an empty place on the desktop and choose "create launcher". This will give you a window where you can type in the name of it you want to give it (what you're doing is creating an icon to launch this program with - the icon is chosen by the program you're trying to launch). Then click the browse button and browse to the downloaded program folder you just extracted someplace - find the file whose name consists of only the programs name (no extension on it either), choose this and click "ok". Now you'll have that programs icon sitting on the desktop which you can double click to run the program you downloaded.

These steps will place the programs icon on the desktop "done the linux way", as opposed to Windows where an exe file once double clicked and installed does this for you.

That's it.

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If you have Debian you could download .deb packages or download directly from the package manager.

This should kill off some terminal time, although if you don't like using the terminal i suggest you switch OS. (IMO)

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