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bcrscahh198987

Various questions

3 posts in this topic

1)

#include <studio.h>

this means the person is programming with windows?

2)

In viewing computers as a whole, where do I start learning about other things besides just programming? I learned a bit of how to program in ruby but I don't understand how compiler work, what linking is, or learning about kernel, how drivers are written, etc

Do I have to go to a university to learn all this?

Edited by bcrscahh198987
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1)

#include <studio.h>

this means the person is programming with windows?

I believe this is meant to be stdio.h rather than studio.h. If so it's a standard library in the C language and so isn't specific to a particular operating system (linux programs also use stdio.h). It stands for STanDard Input/Output, the #include command tells the compiler to include the stdio.h file so that your program can use the functions contained inside it. stdio.h contains the functions used for reading (from files/user input) and writing (to files/screens).

2)

In viewing computers as a whole, where do I start learning about other things besides just programming? I learned a bit of how to program in ruby but I don't understand how compiler work, what linking is, or learning about kernel, how drivers are written, etc

Do I have to go to a university to learn all this?

I went to university to learn this stuff. All the information is out there on the net and in textbooks [textbooks are expensive, so learn about the services at your local library], it's just that I don't know of any one place that pulls it all together and structures it well.

If you get a chance to go to university and study computer science I would recommend it (it's a very broad and interesting subject), but if you don't mind hunting down resources yourself then it is still possible to become a very good programmer without going to university.

Unfortunately I'm not sure where the best places to find these resources on broad topics are. I'm sure other people here are entirely self taught and will be able to give you some good links.

A good approach might be to research which textbooks are used at good universities and then find them at the library (or as torrents) -- most courses stick very close to the contents of the textbook and most well known textbooks will also have websites which provide extra content for lecturers (without needing passwords or anything) such as lecture notes, slides, and homework exercises. (Publishers provide these extras resources because a lecturer is more likely to use a textbook if they don't have to write a whole set of slides and can just modify the ones the supplier provides.)

For example, if you want to learn about operating systems I used this textbook and found it good (and the website also has good extra resources): Operating Systems - William Stallings

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