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FLW_FTW

Mac OSX Leopard Filesystem

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Hey, so my girlfriend uses a Mac and her hardrive is failing. She can no longer boot up her macbook. The people at the Genius Bar told us that we need another mac to access her hard drive. We don't have another Mac--well, our roommates have one, but I'm using this as an excuse for a little learning opportunity on my part. Basically what I want to do is write a program that will be able to understand the (I believe) HFS+ filesystem, and transfer all the information to an external harddrive.

Does anyone know of any resources that could describe the filesystem and how to work with it?

Thanks,

FLW_FTW

edit: On further research, it's probably the ZFS filesystem.

Edited by FLW_FTW
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Write a program to use HFS+? Hardly the most efficient way of going about things.

Boot up a Linux live CD on the machine and do this:


mkdir /mac
mount -t hfsplus /dev/sda1 /mac

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I know this really isn't the information you are looking for, but for the sake of backing up your data. May I suggest trying to use Target Disk Mode to access the data off of the other computer. Both computers have to have firewire. Boot the Mac when it gets to the gray screen hold down T. This will put it into target disk mode. You then will have access to the file system. You can pull all of the data off of the computer that way.

You can also download a copy of Carbon Copy Cloner http://www.bombich.com/index.html - if you can get the Mac to boot, then use that CCC, it'll mirror the drive for you.

You can also boot into a linux distro, you'll be able to read the file system with no issues. Windows cannot read it natively without the help of MacDrive http://www.mediafour.com/products/macdrive/

Edited by ghostshadow
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Write a program to use HFS+? Hardly the most efficient way of going about things.

Boot up a Linux live CD on the machine and do this:


mkdir /mac
mount -t hfsplus /dev/sda1 /mac

Oh, I know, not efficient at all, thus the reason I said "Using it as a learning experience" There are already commercial versions of what I want to do available, as ghostshadow pointed out. This little situation just aroused my interest in the subject, so now I want to learn about it. Will I make the next MacDrive? Hardly, but it will be an educational experience.

@ghostshadow-Thanks for the info, tried using the links you posted, the problem is I don't have all the necessary plugs to connect my computer to my girlfriend's macbook and my computer to the external harddrive--Damn firewire!!

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Yes, the format for OS X is currently HFS+. PPC machines use the Apple Partition Map, Intel based machines use GUID. You can get specifics on the file format here...

http://developer.apple.com/mac/library/technotes/tn/tn1150.html

Note that ZFS was supposed to be rolled out in Leopard. Preliminary support was available in Leopard Server. However, it is not available in Snow Leopard. The project is here...

http://zfs.macosforge.org

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Yes, the format for OS X is currently HFS+. PPC machines use the Apple Partition Map, Intel based machines use GUID. You can get specifics on the file format here...

http://developer.apple.com/mac/library/technotes/tn/tn1150.html

Note that ZFS was supposed to be rolled out in Leopard. Preliminary support was available in Leopard Server. However, it is not available in Snow Leopard. The project is here...

http://zfs.macosforge.org

View PostFLW_FTW, on 28 September 2009 - 11:28 PM, said:

edit: On further research, it's probably the ZFS filesystem.

ZFS? Nah, it most likely is HFS+. Also, Intel Macs use a different partitioning scheme, I think it's called GUID partitioning scheme.

http://en.wikipedia....Partition_Table

Awesome, thanks!

Edited by FLW_FTW
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