Phail_Saph

Twitter Hacked

18 posts in this topic

Twitter was/is currently being hacked. They were knocked out for a little while by a DDoS attack. As I post this, the attack is still on going.

Is it me or has Black Hat Hacking heated up over the past few months?

Here's the Twitter status page link.

Edited by Phail_Saph
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It doesn't really seem that it is being 'hacked' per se, just getting DDoSed

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Yeah, they're just being DDoS'd which doesn't mean too much. Some 14 year old might just be trying out his botnet or something.

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It doesn't really seem that it is being 'hacked' per se, just getting DDoSed

I share your sympathy for the lack of technical prowess involved but it is a legitimate hack. A site DDoS'ed or DoS'ed is a hacked site, especially if it was knocked down which it was. A hacked site doesn't just mean web page graffiti.

Wonder if it's the Iranian government?

Close...one of their "friends"...it looks so far like it was a Russian-Georgian thing...in fact the latest is that it was all over one guy in particular. A massive assault just for one guy- talk about some Hate. They would win the Dave Chapelle hater's ball award!!.

Yeah, they're just being DDoS'd which doesn't mean too much. Some 14 year old might just be trying out his botnet or something.

Do you realize the number of computers necessary to knock out a continuously used, 24-7 site like Facebook and especially Twitter whose micro-blogging volume on a "normal" site would actually look like a DDoS attack? This is way beyond a script kiddie in their parent's basement.

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But n3xg3n, does raise a good point. What is the bar people have for a site being Hacked? Some people don't see a DDoS or a DoS as "hacking" a site. What's the verdict? What does hacking a site mean to people here?

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I share your sympathy for the lack of technical prowess involved but it is a legitimate hack. A site DDoS'ed or DoS'ed is a hacked site

No it isn't. A site that's been "hacked" has had its security compromised in some way by an attacker. A DDoS doesn't compromise security, it just uses up the server's resources.

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I think I'm mostly with you here. In general a DoS is an attack, but I think it crosses the line once a system has been defeated by it or is severely limited by it. For instance, assuming you have a site, if I launch a DDoS attack against it you would say someone is trying to hack me and if your system was taken down you would say..."Gosh someone hacked me and my site is down."

I would take what you say about compromise to the mat because that is a very spacious term. For instance a DoS does compromise security...it's attacking the networking stack; many hacks attempt to overwhelm or defeat it in some way so that it crashes and allows you to gain access to the system. In Twitter's case the attack crashed their stack and so as a 'security' precaution they took the system offline. Also, it limits system's resources preventing those resources from being used in maintaining the security of the system.

But I think what you mean is that someone has penetrated the system's security and gained access ergo a Hack. But even then that can be debated. For instance if you gain access to a system by way of a web exploit, in general, you have the security level of the user that initiated the service which in a secure system is a low level. Did you really hack the system? You are in but can only do read and maybe limited writes; you got through the front door to get stuck in the atrium.

I don't know...how do you define a hack? I guess for me, I'm pretty open. I would define it from the hacker's objective. If I used malicious tactics to disrupt a target in order to express my nefarious will I consider that hacking. In twitter's case they are a service that exists to provide real-time blogging or micro-blogging. If I prevent them from doing that or even "nuke" it to prevent a single user like some reports indicate was the real reason for the attack then I "hacked" it. Mission accomplished. For a remote computer system, say a remote login to a company's intranet where employees can work at home, check email, etc., if my objective is to gain access and I succeed then I hacked it but it depends on the objective...do I want access, do I need a file, do I want to defame a website and post a manifesto, or do I want to prevent the company's employees from accessing it, hindering the company's productivity which in this case would most likely be a DDoS attack, or whatever other objective my evil mind desires.

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I'd call a DDoS a "hack," sure. I would certainly consider a single person (or a relatively small group) disrupting a worldwide organization by leveraging technological means as a hack. Whether or not it's a "good" hack or a "useful" hack or a "worthwhile" hack is another issue. Such value judgments can be made by a variety of criteria, such as innovativeness, technical skill, effectiveness, or various ethical and moral considerations.

I consider hacking an to be an art form (a technological/social-based art, but an art nonetheless), therefore one need only consider the goals and intentions of the perpetrator to determine whether it's indeed "art." After that determination, other questions may be raised, like: "Is it good art?" Is it worthwhile art? Is it morally responsible art, or is it self-serving and detrimental art?

Musicians like Willie D and GG Allin might have written lyrics and/or made performances that glorify violent, destructive behavior; a writer of pedophilic pornography may write a book about an imaginary utopia where naked children beg middle-aged men for sex; propaganda designers may create posters that promote hatred and violence against certain racial or political groups. If some fuckwit smears dog shit on a canvas and calls it art, then it is indeed art, but that ain't saying much. Whether or not somebody actually values it as such is another matter.

Same goes for hacking. If I fuck up while using a computer, type "sudo rm -rf /" and unwittingly destroy a Linux installation, that's not a hack. If, however, I social-engineer somebody else into doing the same thing, it would qualify as a hack, just the same as if I meticulously reconnoitered, enumerated and fingerprinted an entire network, identified a vulnerable service, exploited that service to gain root access and then typed "sudo rm -rf /" in a remote terminal. If I deliberately figured out a new way to completely restore a system which has has been deleted from the / directory, that would be a hack too. It's all about intention and achieving an end result.

So as for the DDoS of Twitter, sure, it's a "hack." It successfully disrupted the service for awhile and probably caused some measure of inconvenience and loss of revenue for some people. If that was the perpetrator's intention, then it was effective, and that might be one way to gauge its success. But if on the other hand, the perpetrators were indeed trying to silence the writings of a particular blogger (as the above-posted article suggests), then it could be seen as a miserable failure because one result of their efforts has been that the said blogger has received worldwide attention which he otherwise wouldn't have had. I for one never knew he existed before the Twitter hack.

Edited by Colonel Panic
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For what it's worth, the allegations made in that article sound like bullshit to me. Why would a government waste resources taking down multiple social networking sites for a few hours, just to silence a single voice. It just doesn't add up.

Edited by Colonel Panic
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A DDoS is a hack like torture is brainwashing, or throwing a brick through a store window is an inside price fixing/lowering attempt.

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It looks like they're being DOS'ed again.

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I share your sympathy for the lack of technical prowess involved but it is a legitimate hack. A site DDoS'ed or DoS'ed is a hacked site

No it isn't. A site that's been "hacked" has had its security compromised in some way by an attacker. A DDoS doesn't compromise security, it just uses up the server's resources.

Exactly! Its more of an annoyance than anything! And plus Twitter is kinda dumb any way.

I have multiple accounts on twitter, I mainly use it as a simple way to relay messages to people.

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I had to laugh when the LDS Church Account got hacked from a bad password and a church representative blamed Twitter for insecurities. The news story made me lol.

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I think Twitter is mostly for self-absorbed people to convey meaningless, mundane musings to others and expect them to care. The only practical use of Twitter I can imagine is "following" a site's tweets and conglomerating sites you frequent into a single feed. As far as individual people go, though...nobody cares what shoes you're wearing or if the guy next to you on the city bus smells like tofu.

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Twitter has its uses. It works well as a universally-accessible medium for members of an organization to communicate relevant information in real time.

However, you're right. Most Twitter users are indeed "twits" who use it as an even more banal version of MySpace or Facebook.

I had to laugh when the LDS Church Account got hacked from a bad password and a church representative blamed Twitter for insecurities. The news story made me lol.

What do you expect from a religion which teaches that a magical Jesus lizard led their people to the "Promised Land" of a poisonous lake in the middle of a desert?

Edited by Colonel Panic
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