Phail_Saph

Twitter Hacked by Employee

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  1. 1. where do ya fit in?

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9 posts in this topic

We've been having great discussions on Pirate Bay (piracy), whether exploits should be exposed (ImageShark), and other stuff fundamental to the community. It has just come out that Twitter was hacked INTERNALLY by an employee and TechCrunch has the file that includes Twitters among Twitter executives which they will release incrementally according to their own standards. The question is, are they doing anything wrong?

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Hahahaha. So I was right technically? XD XD

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I think TechCrunch should do what they want to do. Who am I to say what another person (or company) should or should not do?

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I think TechCrunch should do what they want to do. Who am I to say what another person (or company) should or should not do?

TechCrunch is in this instance a representative of 'the press', who pretty much always push for publishing and always push for the right to publish. They really can't be prevented from publishing as the SCOTUS has upheld Freedom of the Press even when the sources are ill-gotten (New York Times v. US - That would be my interpretation of this case as it pertains to this one, but IANA-Constitutional-L.) But just look at WikiLeaks, just as they have the right to freedom of the press, so does TechCrunch.

The moment we censor the press (or allow companies to do it), freedom doesn't exist any more.

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Honestly, the publishing of information which was obtained illegally should be based on it's newsworthiness or importance.

If some company gets hacked and it's discovered that they are dumping toxic waste into the river, that's newsworthy and important. Random stuff that might be embarrassing to some Twitter exec's isn't that important. And I'm not a Constitutional lawyer either, but I bet that in the rulings on this sort of thing, there are exceptions.

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+1 not really newsworthy,i mean its not hacking if i sit on my apache server and f-up my own webpage. i mean its not like he had access to the machines/passwords or anything. but the media is retarded and puts just about anything thats not news on tv/print so it'll go out sometime.

edit: i guess he wanted to get fired/is a incompetent jackass.

Edited by dinscurge
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I think TechCrunch should do what they want to do. Who am I to say what another person (or company) should or should not do?

TechCrunch is in this instance a representative of 'the press', who pretty much always push for publishing and always push for the right to publish. They really can't be prevented from publishing as the SCOTUS has upheld Freedom of the Press even when the sources are ill-gotten (New York Times v. US - That would be my interpretation of this case as it pertains to this one, but IANA-Constitutional-L.) But just look at WikiLeaks, just as they have the right to freedom of the press, so does TechCrunch.

The moment we censor the press (or allow companies to do it), freedom doesn't exist any more.

Trade Secret laws apparently top that, look at Apple vs ThinkSecret in Cali.

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Trade Secret laws apparently top that, look at Apple vs ThinkSecret in Cali.

Think Secret dropped out of court because Apple paid the owner a handsome settlement. No suit was won.

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Trade Secret laws apparently top that, look at Apple vs ThinkSecret in Cali.

Think Secret dropped out of court because Apple paid the owner a handsome settlement. No suit was won.

But Apple didn't lose either, and the court did not slap down their suit as frivolous and did not find that the press cannot publish trade secrets as news. That is more telling.

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