xcalibur

New Operating Systems

   33 members have voted

  1. 1. where do ya fit in?

    • White hat
      2
    • Black Hat
      3
    • Gray Hat
      12
    • I don't wear any fukking hats.
      13

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48 posts in this topic

--Edit--

ouch...you gave me a minus...I gave you a plus anyway because we both believe diversity is good.

I'll give you a plus on this to balance out once you explained your reasoning better, I wish there was a way that you could un-vote in case you misvote or there is a misunderstanding. I thought you were saying it was pointless because it wouldn't dent M$ market share as your own opinion, I didn't consider that you were talking from the perspective of the stated opinion of the Chrome devs.

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Talk about a good guy :goodjob: ...for that I added you as a friend :camp: ...marshmellows?

I had the same thought too, about being able to unvote, since I recently made a mistake, but I guess doing what you did balances it out. One can always find a post somewhere to add.

-----Phail_Saph-----

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I'm highly anticipating CHROME OS, even if it is linux.

Google makes good software, highly polished solftware as N3xg3n would have said.

It will be good, it will have to be. After all, it's from "Google"

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I wonder if they'll be using X on Chrome OS? They could avoid a lot of bullshit, as well as help the Linux community out (if it's open source) by replacing that piece of shit. I think the only real clue they gave about the OS is it's "based on Linux." This could mean it's based on Android as well. Or they could be using the Linux kernel, but it's not just another Ubuntu flavor. They could be replacing the entire userspace with something pared down and purpose-made.

I don't think I'd run it though, unless I can do more generic things with it. I need to be able to run a command line and Ruby, for example.

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I wonder if they'll be using X on Chrome OS? They could avoid a lot of bullshit, as well as help the Linux community out (if it's open source) by replacing that piece of shit. I think the only real clue they gave about the OS is it's "based on Linux." This could mean it's based on Android as well. Or they could be using the Linux kernel, but it's not just another Ubuntu flavor. They could be replacing the entire userspace with something pared down and purpose-made.

I don't think I'd run it though, unless I can do more generic things with it. I need to be able to run a command line and Ruby, for example.

You are right on about the Android thing. Even though they've said that it isn't going to be based on Android a lot of people are confused by what their marketing strategy is. They are already running spin around the fact that Android was 'supposed' to be a netbook OS too in addition to its claim to fame smartphone genesis. It failed miserably to claim any respectable market share and in fact M$ has slightly over 90% penetration in the netbook market...more than in the desktop...But now Chrome OS is supposed to start out in the netbook category...I smell as much a leap in OS technology as I do a marketing counter-attack...e.g., MSN->Live->Bing.

My fear like yours is that because they want to migrate the 'standard' user to the cloud space...which is part of the stated plan with Chrome OS...they are going to purposely limit access to lower levels...aka command line, shells, etc.... so that the user only operates the book like you operate a browser...start it up and go and don't care about what's going on under the hood. Obviously this is antithetical to the hacker ethos. But then again most hacks are web based with the uber goal of remote access...it might turn out to be an incredible web hacking tool box...

BTW, thanks for the link to the Android Live site...I didn't even know about it until you posted it.

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Yeah, you should put in Chrome OS.

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Just curious. There's a lot of buzz around about these lately so I figured I'd see where Binrev stands.

You might want to edit the poll to include Chrome OS...I'm curious to see how it compares against the other flavors of Linux.

-----Phail_Saph-----

I'd say wait until ChromeOS is something truly concrete. Almost everything I read about it is mostly promises, abstractions and very little implementation details. All I know is it's Linux, a Chrome browser, a small GUI, connected in ???? ways in addition to ?????? components to produce a result with a security level of ????? Not a lot of certainty here....

Personally, I don't see a need for ChromeOS. One of the smaller Linux distro's does fine, esp. with a very trimmed kernel and perhaps a good UI added. Extensions such as grsecurity could be used for some easy baked-in security. Hell, with Google building the system kernel up and designing the apps, even some form of MAC like SELinux or RSBAC could be used successfully. And while I'm not currently that excited about ChromeOS, both Chrome and Android are pretty nice offerings with useful benefits in the netbook market. So far, ChromeOS is just hot air.

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true but chrome probably isnt going to be another android the only programs you can use are java/web bs. for the average user twitter and face book w.e. bs is good enough. but i dont see it being usefull at all if its like android.

edit: i mean what you can run java, theres no point in even using linux and dealing with the lack of hardware support to us java which will run perfectly fine on windows.

Edited by dinscurge
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Windows 7 simply because I want to see how they are going to improve it. I never was a big fan of Vista, and Seven looks like something I can get behind. I like if from the RC1, and think that it could be something I could migrate too after I tire of my XP install. Chrome OS looks like it could be interesting as well. I think I'm just caught up in the novelty of it though, as opposed to the practicality.

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theres no point in even using linux and dealing with the lack of hardware support

Um, excuse me? :blink:

There are plenty of logical reasons to use linux.

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theres no point in even using linux and dealing with the lack of hardware support

Um, excuse me? :blink:

There are plenty of logical reasons to use linux.

than tell me why you would deal with basically no-limited hardware support to run JAVA, FLASH, and the interweb, and why they are sooo much better on linux.

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theres no point in even using linux and dealing with the lack of hardware support

Um, excuse me? :blink:

There are plenty of logical reasons to use linux.

than tell me why you would deal with basically no-limited hardware support to run JAVA, FLASH, and the interweb, and why they are sooo much better on linux.

Wow, that's all I got to say.

Wow.

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thats android basically no native apps. inless of course you want to downgrade to rc.29 which has more security flaws then w2k, if people use your phone they can execute shell code from making a text message, it probably has problems with security as well such as when chrome first came out. you shouldnt have to do anything to get native apps on a "open" operating system. if its anything like android im staying away from it like the plague. i mean it would be totally useless for a server or a netbook as netbooks are already slow you dont need to be running every application of the java run time engine.

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You forgot Mandriva, Gentoo or Slackware. All excellent distros in their own right.

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You forgot Mandriva, Gentoo or Slackware. All excellent distros in their own right.

Also BeOS and Plan9.

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You forgot Mandriva, Gentoo or Slackware. All excellent distros in their own right.

Also BeOS and Plan9.

Actually, Plan9 (which I've never heard of) seems really interesting.

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I voted for FreeBSD 7.2, but I'm excited about 8.0.

http://ivoras.sharanet.org/freebsd/freebsd8.html

- GCC has been relicensed under GPLv3, so FreeBSD is switching to the BSD-licensed CLANG+LLVM compiler infrastructure, which I think is very interesting.

- Parallel port builds

- procstat: A process inspection utility

- DTrace

That actually does sound quite interesting, thanks for the heads up. I wonder is OS X will also move away from GCC?

Edit: Did some googling and it looks like this is exactly what apple is doing http://lists.apple.com/archives/Xcode-users/2008/Jul/msg00974.html (ditching gcc for clang and llvm)

Edited by livinded
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I refuse to buy Apple products, I am not satisfied with Microsoft Windows and all the new Linux distros will instead of including a well-designed desktop called KDE 3.5 will instead include a buggy-beta quality desktop that is called KDE 4. It is so bad the there are features and functions present in the old version that are not in the new version!

So I am not happy with any new OS. I suppose for text-based systems I can continue using the newer distros but for GUI systems I will be sticking with openSUSE 11.1 for the foreseeable future.

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I've been using KDE since the 3.0 days and am extremely satisfied with KDE 4. KDE 4.0 of course was buggy but was never meant to be used by the public as it was. But since 4.1 was released it's been pretty stable and had a lot of the necessary features. With KDE 4.3 coming out in the next few weeks most of the actual KDE libraries will not be pretty much there and KDE will be pretty much on par featurewise with KDE 3.5 (aside from a few apps which have still not been finished porting yet eg. KDevelop and K3B)

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I'm probably most "excited" for Windows 7, even though Windows ranks below Linux and OS X in terms of how much I use them.

But it's the level of improvement that makes it exciting. I've been using the Windows 7 RC and it's a direction Microsoft has needed to take for a long time: more lean, less cruft.

Snow Leopard is a refinement of Leopard, which in itself wasn't greatly different from Tiger.

Ubuntu is my main OS, at work and at home. The poll lists Ubuntu 9.04 which is already here (and which I'm using as I type this). But if we consider vote for Ubuntu 9.10... I don't see anything major on the immediate horizon. The transition from HAL to DeviceKit will get started. That's mildly exciting.

But Windows 7 walks away with the vote as it's likely the only one that will be significantly (arguably) different from the previous iteration. And most important, that significant change is being given to the OS most in need of it. :)

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Says a lot when the majority of users on a computer savvy website voted for Windows. hehe

I voted Ubuntu..mainly cause Mints based off it.

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Hello all,

I was browsing BinRev and came across this most interesting web page on operating systems.

For some years I have been looking for a bootable CD where I could just put it in the tray, close it and get it to boot with out any hassels, I am not talking about the XP or 2000 setup CDs, but a tool CD.

Lets go back a bit to the old DOS days, just 1 floppy disk could do this and one could take the floppy to another PC and it would work about the same.

Since MS$ decided to do away with bootable floppies, I have been lost until now.

Years ago it was very easy to make a bootable floppy, format it with the S switch and you had a bootable disk, put a range of the usual programs on it and you had a floppy you could do some really good work with to get a non functioning PC up and running again.

If you forgot to include the /s switch, just type in SYS <drive> and that drive / floppy became bootable.

Since Bill shut the gate, unless you knew how to make a bootable CD, you were history unless you knew Linux and had a broadband connection.

Others came along with their complex-complicated way/instructions, you had to go to this website or that website, download this or that, in other words, jump through heeeeeeps of hooooooops making this software or that software, some sites wer'nt acesable anymore, it became just far too difficult for this older bloke.

I emailed several of these people explaining how intimmedating it all was becoming, but to 99% of them, they didn't think of the hurdles one has to jump over.

In my book, a software program needs to be very simple to make and use if you want it to get major coverage, think about this a moment, all of you reading this will grow older, there will become a time when delving around the insides of software will become just too much trouble, and it will happen as this is human nature.

I came across ReactOS about a month ago, here http://www.reactos.org/en/index.html

downloaded it, made the .iso file and burnt the CD.

It was "simple and easy to do"

I had a Laptop here that has no Hard Drive, all I wanted was to see if this ReactOS could boot the laptop, and it did.

ReactOS loaded itself into RAM only, and it is fast.

It has the GUI interface, and the mouse arrow as well, no doubt "other" software utilities could run on ReactOS also, but I am happy to see my laptop fire up.

Sooooo I guess ReactCD gets my vote today anyway, it hasnt all the bells and whistles that all the other bootable CDs have, but who cares at this time, they will come.

ReactOS also was designed to be a standin for XP so all those programs which run on XP could be run on ReactOS instead of XP.

So I guess I got my bootable CD at long last, no more havin to put the knobbled XP CD in the drive and dont press the R to recovery key or it will break the OS.

The great part, this ReactOS is just 33 megs in size, a bit bigger that a floppy disk, but I believe it to be the smallest around about now, and it was just a single file to download, save and burn.

Edited by electricme
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