decoder

(ARCHIVE) some numbers

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Personal note which I literally wrote down after I dialed *2# successfully : It worked? Dialing a # at the end should've invalidated the attempt. WTF?

At least in my experience, dialing # just tells the switch "okay, I'm finished dialing"

NIce, though. Any idea what these do? From my switch (Qwest 5ESS), *1, *2, and *3 all go to reorder before I can give it the next digit. *4 waits for something else, but nothing I can think to try works; ABCD tones, dialpulse, *, #, 1-0. Waiting will give you a YCDNGT, though.

However, their email does not explain why I can dial 'extra digits' after an in-use star code and still have it work (see above when dialing *980 through *989).

I think that's just the switch's way of dealing with extra digits. Like for example, if you dial 1-800-YELLOWPAGES, it knows those last four digits shouldn't be there, so it ignores them and puts the call through.

Note : When dialing *3 and *3#, the star code 'completes' slightly differently. Rather than simply getting the 2nd dial tone, it first gives a very short reorder and then the 2nd dial tone.

You aren't on a DMS-100 by any chance, are you? That might explain why *67 is behaving so funny too. Back when I got service from a DMS, I remember having to dial *67# when I was scanning if I wanted to move a little faster. Over here, the 5ESS just immediately gives you dialtone back. And starts acting a little strangely too. A lot of dialing errors go straight to reorder, if you made the first digit of 1167 dialpulse instead of DTMF (but not the second), it won't break dialtone when you press * or #, but if you break dialtone again using dialpulse, it'll take a lot longer to break. If you're familiar with the Evan Doorbell tapes, think about how Crossbar 1 had a burst of dialtone after the first digit.

Switches are weird. blink.gif

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ThoughtPhreaker –

At least in my experience, dialing # just tells the switch "okay, I'm finished dialing"

The reason the question crossed my mind is when I dial a working start code, say *98, it doesn't need the # at the end yet it knows you're finished dialing. Being this is the case, I'm thinking it must the switch acting weird because I can dial the *2 without the # at the end and have it complete anyway!

NIce, though. Any idea what these do? From my switch (Qwest 5ESS), *1, *2, and *3 all go to reorder before I can give it the next digit. *4 waits for something else, but nothing I can think to try works; ABCD tones, dialpulse, *, #, 1-0. Waiting will give you a YCDNGT, though.

I have no idea what these do... yet. I'm still testing trying to see if I can discover what they do. No results yet though, which sucks. I'm dying of curiosity to find out. :P

ABCD tones? I don't have a box, just the regular phone. I'll need to consider it since this limits me - what if any of them can only work via a box? Damn, now you got me thinking since using a phone doesn't allow me to input other tones.

I think that's just the switch's way of dealing with extra digits. Like for example, if you dial 1-800-YELLOWPAGES, it knows those last four digits shouldn't be there, so it ignores them and puts the call through.

Yea, I agree... most likely this is the case, however I was daydreaming/hoping it may 'for another reason' so I was testing to see if it may turn out to be the case.

You aren't on a DMS-100 by any chance, are you? That might explain why *67 is behaving so funny too. Back when I got service from a DMS, I remember having to dial *67# when I was scanning if I wanted to move a little faster. Over here, the 5ESS just immediately gives you dialtone back. And starts acting a little strangely too. A lot of dialing errors go straight to reorder, if you made the first digit of 1167 dialpulse instead of DTMF (but not the second), it won't break dialtone when you press * or #, but if you break dialtone again using dialpulse, it'll take a lot longer to break. If you're familiar with the Evan Doorbell tapes, think about how Crossbar 1 had a burst of dialtone after the first digit.

Switches are weird. :blink:

Very good. You get a star, heh. I'm a DMS-100 alright.

I couldn't agree more. Switches are weird.

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Just discovered this, FWIW :

When a Qwest billing rep calls the ANAC 570-674-0086, they hear back this number :

212-0000

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ABCD tones? I don't have a box, just the regular phone. I'll need to consider it since this limits me - what if any of them can only work via a box? Damn, now you got me thinking since using a phone doesn't allow me to input other tones.

If you have a modem, they'll generate the tones quite nicely. Beware that sometimes they only like it in a certain case, though.

When a Qwest billing rep calls the ANAC 570-674-0086, they hear back this number :

212-0000

huh, the last few times I got a rep to call an ANAC, they got some 866 number.

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I'm getting an interesting response by dialing the following number from different types of phone line

757-485-9999

From AT&T cellular, it tells me that "you are not allowed to call this type of number" (but I can call other numbers in the same exchange with no problems).

From a SIP provider, I get a long delay followed by a reorder.

From a landline I get an immediate reorder (sounds local, but not sure).

Any ideas what this is?

AsteriskPhreak

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It's probably just there to test the SS7 capability of the switch. I get a CBCAD recording from my local office.

You might be interested in this; 843-661-0000

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It's probably just there to test the SS7 capability of the switch. I get a CBCAD recording from my local office.

You might be interested in this; 843-661-0000

interesting... does that loop forever or is there an end to it?

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It depends on how your carrier treats the condition. VoIP carriers are generally known for handing the call off to a hundred people each with about a hundred different interconnect agreements.

It'd be interesting to find an ANAC in a really high USF ratecenter that does this >.>

EDIT: hmm, it accepts collect calls. That's always an easy way to call things through random carriers. 867-980-1001 is about the most interesting way I can think to route the call. I mean, if one of the northernmost telephone exchanges in the world is your kinda thing.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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It depends on how your carrier treats the condition. VoIP carriers are generally known for handing the call off to a hundred people each with about a hundred different interconnect agreements.

It'd be interesting to find an ANAC in a really high USF ratecenter that does this >.>

EDIT: hmm, it accepts collect calls. That's always an easy way to call things through random carriers. 867-980-1001 is about the most interesting way I can think to route the call. I mean, if one of the northernmost telephone exchanges in the world is your kinda thing.

Interesting. I take it the condition is that the call cannot be completed though a particular carrier? AT&T cellular makes two attempts and cuts me off. CallWithUs and Verizon landline each make several dozen attempts. Verizon eventually ends with the "all circuits are busy now" recording. I notice the voice is somewhat muffled on most of the attempts, but a few of them sound particularly clear. I guess there is really that much difference in the quality between carriers?

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Interesting. I take it the condition is that the call cannot be completed though a particular carrier?

There's cases where that might happen, but I think here it's just a matter of how many routes it has to try. Like, AT&T doesn't buy minutes from any other carriers, so the originating long distance tandem, probably aware that the circuit busy message has nothing to do with what route is being taken through the AT&T network, will send it to the legacy Bellsouth network instead before having no choice but to give up.

A lot of newer networks operate on a model of buying minutes on other carriers' networks instead of owning every inch of fiber your call goes through. So failing one route, it will send it to another - and then failing that, the carrier they send the call to will send it to yet another carrier and so on and so on until someone (or something) gets impatient and hangs up the call.

I guess there is really that much difference in the quality between carriers?

Yup. Especially these days, when you're dealing with two completely different business models, a ton of different technologies, and the motivation to constantly have another channel to sell minutes on.

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If you want to see how your carrier handles reroutes, try calling the old Pittsburgh weather number, 412-936-1212. You'll get a recording that says "This service is no longer available" from what I believe is known as the "Downtown 71T" tandem. Sprint LD from my house retries the number at least 10 times, picking lower-quality routes as it goes.

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huh, at least with 101-0333 here, it's a little less than ten, and has no lower quality routes.

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huh, at least with 101-0333 here, it's a little less than ten, and has no lower quality routes.

So can someone outline the steps that are actually taking place here? My guess is something like this:

1. Local carrier tries to connect to remote number, through other long-distance carrier.

2. Remote signals, through SS7, that the call cannot be routed this way. But it passes audio meanwhile anyway?

3. Local carrier tries next LD carrier since that one did not work.

4. Once all carriers have been tried, local exchange gives up and plays a recording such as "all circuits busy".

I have a DID number to my Asterisk PBX. Is there any way it could cause it to send a similar signal? My guess is no, since my protocol is SIP and it does not change to SS7 until it leaves the DID provider?

AsteriskPhreak

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So can someone outline the steps that are actually taking place here? My guess is something like this:

1. Local carrier tries to connect to remote number, through other long-distance carrier.

2. Remote signals, through SS7, that the call cannot be routed this way. But it passes audio meanwhile anyway?

3. Local carrier tries next LD carrier since that one did not work.

4. Once all carriers have been tried, local exchange gives up and plays a recording such as "all circuits busy".

Since my long distance tandem happens to be a little more vocal about what's going on, this might be the best way to illustrate what's going on; http://thoughtphreak..._bellsouth.flac

Once I finish dialing (the recording starts immediately after this), my 5ESS sends the call to the Qwest long distance tandem. Once it's performed call setup, it stays uninvolved for the majority of the call; all the 5ESS knows at this point is that the call hasn't suped yet.

The first two routes are pretty straightforward - the long distance tandem sets the call up with the distant end equipment, and it reaches the terminating office. Once we're connected, it's standard practice to just relay the audio until further instructed. In this case, a cause code is sent back to my long distance tandem giving it some variety of all circuits busy condition. You can hear my long distance tandem acting upon this by making a popping noise every time it picks a different route.

After these first few routes, the long distance tandem is put into a position similar to my 5ESS; it passes the call to another piece of equipment, and is expected to keep relaying audio for the interim. You'll hear it - or something else in the connection - act upon the same cause code by just making a soft burst of static. Finally, once it's out of routes to try, it'll pass the cause code onto my long distance tandem, which quickly runs out of routes to try itself. Once it's through, it passes the cause code back to my office, which has no choice but to give me a recording.

All carriers act upon situations like this differently - if it's a big carrier like MCI, they can try a different route through their own network, or even just try the same route twice. If you tried making a collect call to this through AT&T, the OSPS (this actually depends on which one you home off of; not all OSPSes do this) lets you know when it's re-attempting the call. If you're using the Sprint network, their tandem will play the all circuits busy message itself, and then send an unrelated cause code back to your office which usually just prompts the switch to dump you to reorder.

As for generating these codes for SIP, it's all relative to how the media gateway wants to interperate it. If you take a look at what SIP and ISDN cause codes look like, they're both very different;

http://networking.ri...ncausecodes.php

http://en.wikipedia...._response_codes

You can send whatever SIP response you like back to the media gateway, but what it sends back via SS7 depends on what the software feels accurately describes your condition.

Also, just be sure that Asterisk isn't making the call supervise; there's times that even when you never explicitly tell it to, Asterisk feels it understands your best interests better than you do, so it'll force the call to answer without telling you. On a 5ESS, you can verify whether or not a call has answered by trying to flash. The short answer is if it gives you studder dialtone, the call has answered. If not, it'll ignore you. In my (admittedly limited, I'm actually going to try this once I finish this post) experience with this happening, this won't effect a switch's behavior too much, but this could also easily anger something that's connecting your call. Fear the switches, for they are vengeful.

Edited by ThoughtPhreaker
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If you want to see how your carrier handles reroutes, try calling the old Pittsburgh weather number, 412-936-1212. You'll get a recording that says "This service is no longer available" from what I believe is known as the "Downtown 71T" tandem. Sprint LD from my house retries the number at least 10 times, picking lower-quality routes as it goes.

I have Verizon LD for my LD carrier. It piggy backs off each of the Verizon tandems to get to its destination.

After the recording plays, it "drops back" to the Verizon LD tandem in Pittsburgh with an All Circuits Are Busy recording, identifying itself as tandem PI-002.

On MCI (101-0222) it just goes to reorder after the recording plays.

On Sprint (101-0333), it retries and replays the recording multiple times and never seems to quit! :)

On Qwest (101-0432) it also retries. But you hear a click each time it retries. It stops afer about 10 tries.

On Excel/Vartec (10-0297) it also retries and doesn't quit.

On AT&T (10-0288) it plays once and then quits, dropping back to my CO.

On AT&T OSPS it plays once and "drops back" to OSPS and plays an All Circuits Busy recording (in this case from the origination OSPS 804-0T)

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Feed line of some sort - 216-781-9310

Beware, it's a bit loud ;) .

Here's it's German counterpart;

+49-81-61-42-062

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Here's a couple of odd numbers -

541-459-0000 - Strange buzzing noise (CNAM: QWEST CORP)

718-517-9800 - Loud, raucous noise

970-369-0099 - Otis elevator in tiny, isolated resort town, on odd sounding PBX

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Interesting payphone on EWCD switch (non digital, no dtmf and CID), this line is VLF with SSB so sounds very nice

What mean VLF and SSB?. HF link?

Thanks in advance!!!

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Interesting payphone on EWCD switch (non digital, no dtmf and CID), this line is VLF with SSB so sounds very nice

What mean VLF and SSB?. HF link?

Thanks in advance!!!

just a guess... could be wrong... VLF - very low frequency SSB - single side band HF - high frequency

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310-347-3277

"id number 1 all channels are normal..(tone) channel 1 normal channel 2 normal channel 3 normal channel 4 normal... (tone) -(repeats 3x).... goodbye"

it appears that it is from some bakery... possibly some type of monitoring system?

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710-982-2303

Takes a long time (over 30 seconds) to go through. When it finally goes through, a standard dial tone comes on. If you dial anything, it asks for a PIN. If you do not dial within about 5 seconds it hangs up.

AsteriskPhreak

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710-NCS-GETS is supposedly the only number in the 710 area code... although i would assume that there are plenty others hidden in there...

with that said - i get a reorder from my voip provider, and a "hmm.. that does not appear to be a valid number" with google voice for 710-982-2303

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710-NCS-GETS is supposedly the only number in the 710 area code... although i would assume that there are plenty others hidden in there...

with that said - i get a reorder from my voip provider, and a "hmm.. that does not appear to be a valid number" with google voice for 710-982-2303

Perhaps I'd call that government NPA if I beige boxed and called it from the # I boxed into.

I have to wonder what's on the other side if you put in the correct PIN.

P.S. There are other numbers, I had once called a few. I recall trying 710-000-0000 for the heck of it but it failed.

Edited by resistor X
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710-NCS-GETS is supposedly the only number in the 710 area code... although i would assume that there are plenty others hidden in there...

with that said - i get a reorder from my voip provider, and a "hmm.. that does not appear to be a valid number" with google voice for 710-982-2303

From my IPhone, 710-982-2303 gets a different tone (sounds somewhat like low tone) after just a few seconds, then the same request to enter a PIN when dialing something.

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As far as I'm aware, there's three different GETS networks - or at least three different ways onto it. 101-0288, 101-0222, and 101-0333 (AT&T, MCI, and Sprint) all run separate gateways that process calls. While AT&T and Sprint use independent platforms, MCI has a DMS process calls, possibly even the very same one used for normal long distance calls.

So GETS as it stands is essentially like a toll-free number, but without the screwy SMS-800 routings, or dependency on a single carrier. Even if you don't have long distance service, a 1+ call to the 710 NPA will route perfectly fine; it's designed to be free from everything. There was even a message on Protel's site a few years back encouraging COCOT owners to make 710 calls free.

In other news, 710-555-xxxx will get you an error recording instead of the typical GETS platform on one of these carriers.

202-651-9911 - This recording is funny in a bureaucratic, phone company sort of way.

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