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Want to learn HTML

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Hello,

I am looking for some good popular book which can teach me HTML markup language. I need some renown book (all time favorite book).

Can anyone please suggest the book I can purchase.

Thank you

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HTML is *extremely* simple. The only tags you need to know are:

<HTML>, <HEAD>, <BODY>, <TITLE>, <A>, <IMG>, <DIV>, <SPAN>, <P>, and <BR>.

That's it. With that, you can do everything HTML has to offer, Javascript and objects (flash\video) aside. What you actually need to know is CSS. Much of what used to be done in the HTML world as it pertains to formatting text, defining colours, creating tables, has been taken over by CSS. Using <FONT> tags and <I> to define italics is no longer the proper way to do things, despite what the older HTML books teach. For that reason, do *not* learn from any book older than a few years.

As for CSS, it's pretty simple in its own right. I can't really recommend a book per se, as I've learned everything from just looking at the source of other webpages. Just keep in mind CSS, and the importance of properly laying out your code so that it's pleasant to the eyes.

Edited by Seal
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I really like "HTML & XHTML the definitive guide" and "Cascading Style Sheets the definitive guide". Both are published by O'Reilly books

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seal, I'd say there are a few more essential ones such as <ul>, <li>, <span>, and <form>. While tables should never be used for layouts, they are still an important and usually the best way to represent tabular data. Aside from just learning the tags, you should also familiarize yourself with Section 508 and WAI standards. These are accessibility guidelines that should be followed. Other than that I'd recommend learning CSS and writing strictly validated HTML and CSS. Doing so goes a long way to ensuring that sites are displayed properly across browsers. While some *cough* ie6 *cough* are extremely far from complaint and sometimes require hacks, standards should always bee followed.

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You're right livinded. :)

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I'd recommend against "picking up" HTML from varied resources and source code on the Internet. This teaches very bad habits and in this multi-browser world, standards are extremely important. Also, by learning in this way, you won't know any of the reasoning and philosophies behind HTML which are as important to know (if not more) as the tags themselves.

I don't have a proper knowledge of HTML, only some of the philosophies and enough tags to get me by. This may be all you need though, depending on what you're going to be doing with it. The breadth and depth of your knowledge need only be as expansive as your personal needs.

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For CSS, I found the Lynda.com video tutorial quite a good one.

I try to keep as much of the layout and style definitions separate from the content as possible, contained in an external CSS file.

The main reasons for this is that it keeps my content pages (.html or .php) as keyword rich as possible, less filled with design/layout tags which the search engines seem to like.

Secondly having CSS (and Javascript) in an external page helps the pages to download faster. The external CSS file is cached by the browser, so if a visitor comes back, they already have the layout, it's just the content/HTML they will download again (as long as the CSS file still exists in their cache).

I think it's pretty excepted now that you use CSS where ever possible.

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Secondly having CSS (and Javascript) in an external page helps the pages to download faster. The external CSS file is cached by the browser, so if a visitor comes back, they already have the layout, it's just the content/HTML they will download again (as long as the CSS file still exists in their cache).

Not to mention, it is a big time saver on large sites that use the same properties for paragraphs, H1, or custom elements for multiple pages.

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HTML is *extremely* simple. The only tags you need to know are:

<HTML>, <HEAD>, <BODY>, <TITLE>, <A>, <IMG>, <DIV>, <SPAN>, <P>, and <BR>.

What about <script>? Isn't java used in html all the time?

If your looking for cool scripts when making fun little web pages Here

is a fun site.

Also, Question: what is the VB script that opens your D: drive?

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Thank you fallas

I appreciate your help

I go for website as my tutorial to learn.

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seal, I'd say there are a few more essential ones such as <ul>, <li>, <span>, and <form>. While tables should never be used for layouts, they are still an important and usually the best way to represent tabular data. Aside from just learning the tags, you should also familiarize yourself with Section 508 and WAI standards. These are accessibility guidelines that should be followed. Other than that I'd recommend learning CSS and writing strictly validated HTML and CSS. Doing so goes a long way to ensuring that sites are displayed properly across browsers. While some *cough* ie6 *cough* are extremely far from complaint and sometimes require hacks, standards should always bee followed.

IE 7 requires many of the same hacks, as well. First to mind is the ridiculous "text-align:center;" on the parent element of another using auto left and right margins. What the fuck?

I will go so far as to say that <table> still does have a place for layouts. Namely, in places where the layout makes sense to do in tables, such as data entry forms. Like, you have rows that contain a column with a label and corresponding column with an input box. From experience, you *can* certainly do it with <div>, but you will spend WAY more time trying to make the layout look the same in all browsers than you will in trying to maintain the old legacy <table> mark-up on future edits. I wish this weren't the case, but when making things align properly even then the user has their text-size bumped up for readability, this is probably the easiest way to go. You should DEFINITELY use CSS to apply formatting to the text, though.

The rule of thumb I usually follow is to do the majority of the layout with <div>, and only use <table> where it makes sense (again, read above).

Of course, if you have 100% control of the design, and you know how non-table layouts work, you should design with this in mind. This to me is why tables even still persist, as a compromise to outdated ways in which a web page should be laid out. Take my opinion with a grain of salt, I do most web development in an environment where I'm given creative direction in the form of a Photoshop PSD, and have to implement it as HTML.

At any rate, off that tangent - I've not read a lot of literature on doing CSS/HTML. I feel, there's so many variables (browser, screen resolution, etc) that differ from user to user that the only way to learn it is to just start trying it out, and correct things as you go along, and developing your own "situational" standards. The great thing about the web, is that if you see something you'd like to be able to do, it's easy to take a look at how someone else does it and then reverse engineer it for your purpose.

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seal, I'd say there are a few more essential ones such as <ul>, <li>, <span>, and <form>. While tables should never be used for layouts, they are still an important and usually the best way to represent tabular data. Aside from just learning the tags, you should also familiarize yourself with Section 508 and WAI standards. These are accessibility guidelines that should be followed. Other than that I'd recommend learning CSS and writing strictly validated HTML and CSS. Doing so goes a long way to ensuring that sites are displayed properly across browsers. While some *cough* ie6 *cough* are extremely far from complaint and sometimes require hacks, standards should always bee followed.

IE 7 requires many of the same hacks, as well. First to mind is the ridiculous "text-align:center;" on the parent element of another using auto left and right margins. What the fuck?

I will go so far as to say that <table> still does have a place for layouts. Namely, in places where the layout makes sense to do in tables, such as data entry forms. Like, you have rows that contain a column with a label and corresponding column with an input box. From experience, you *can* certainly do it with <div>, but you will spend WAY more time trying to make the layout look the same in all browsers than you will in trying to maintain the old legacy <table> mark-up on future edits. I wish this weren't the case, but when making things align properly even then the user has their text-size bumped up for readability, this is probably the easiest way to go. You should DEFINITELY use CSS to apply formatting to the text, though.

The rule of thumb I usually follow is to do the majority of the layout with <div>, and only use <table> where it makes sense (again, read above).

Of course, if you have 100% control of the design, and you know how non-table layouts work, you should design with this in mind. This to me is why tables even still persist, as a compromise to outdated ways in which a web page should be laid out. Take my opinion with a grain of salt, I do most web development in an environment where I'm given creative direction in the form of a Photoshop PSD, and have to implement it as HTML.

At any rate, off that tangent - I've not read a lot of literature on doing CSS/HTML. I feel, there's so many variables (browser, screen resolution, etc) that differ from user to user that the only way to learn it is to just start trying it out, and correct things as you go along, and developing your own "situational" standards. The great thing about the web, is that if you see something you'd like to be able to do, it's easy to take a look at how someone else does it and then reverse engineer it for your purpose.

I mentioned that tables should still be used for tabular data. However that is the only time they should be used. Divs, and spans should be used in all other places to align and lay out a page. IE7 still requires some hacks, but at least it sort of almost complies with standards. IE8 is supposed to properly implement javascript (or at least comply with how other browsers do) as well as fix a lot of the CSS problems where it doesn't render pages correctly.

Edited by livinded
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