Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
King Tiger

Shared Documents

8 posts in this topic

I just got a laptop, and here's what I'd like to try: I'm putting windows and linux on seperate partitions, but I want them to share the same documents, music, downloads, etc. folders on a third partition. Is there an easy way to do this? I'm going to screw around with it, but if anyone's ever done this, your assistance would be appriciated.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This may be a dirty way but I do it everytime:

Just keep all your files on your XP Partition and mount your NTFS-Partition while using Linux. That way you have your documents on both. You can also create a new NTFS Partition to store all your files on.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kool Henc has the right idea. I usually create a separate partition for /home and format it with NTFS. You can then use the NTFS-3g driver to write to it. There's also an ext2 driver for Windows (32/64 bit NT4/2000/XP/Vista) called ext2ifs, which works fairly well. I've been using the NTFS-3g driver as of late for my external drive, as it is shared between Linux, OS X and Windows, and I've found ext2 support under OS X to be buggy.

One thing to consider: file permissions will be somewhat broken under NTFS, so don't use it for anything but /home at most; or, better yet, have a separate partition for shared data.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right, there's no need for a third partition anymore. You used to have to make a third FAT32 partition because that's the only partition both operating systems could write to. Though, Linux has almost complete write support to NTFS (and very good read support) and there's an ext2 (compatible with ext3, without the journaling) driver out there. Though I find it not very useful. I tend to do all my work on one and play on the other, and end up having no need to share docs all that much. The one thing I do use that for is to access all my music from both operating systems though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could just start one up in VMWare and use SMB. (No, you don't need a VMWare disk, it will work with a real disk partition after some initial setup.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Right, there's no need for a third partition anymore. You used to have to make a third FAT32 partition because that's the only partition both operating systems could write to. Though, Linux has almost complete write support to NTFS (and very good read support) and there's an ext2 (compatible with ext3, without the journaling) driver out there. Though I find it not very useful. I tend to do all my work on one and play on the other, and end up having no need to share docs all that much. The one thing I do use that for is to access all my music from both operating systems though.

Keep in mind that FAT32 can't store files larger than 4GB, which might not be a problem for you, but if you have high quality movies you'll be out of luck.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You could just start one up in VMWare and use SMB. (No, you don't need a VMWare disk, it will work with a real disk partition after some initial setup.)

I had to do that once. Talk about a roundabout way of accessing files on another filesystem.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I was going for was a setup where my Windows documents, music, etc. folders would be the same as my linux documents, music, etc folders in /home.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0