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Dr. Z2A

how to be an ISP

12 posts in this topic

I just got to thinking and I realized that I don't know why exactly ISPs are necessary. Can someone explain to me what they have that I don't that makes me have to go through a middle man and why I couldn't just make my own ISP? I guess basically what I'm asking is how one would make/start an ISP.

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Most backbone providers generally offer only large pipes directly to lower tier providers. As a downstream provider the less bandwidth you can afford the lower down the tier you'll be.

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I'm sorry, I feel a little ignorant, but can someone explain to me what backbones are?

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A backbone is a high-speed, usually fiber-optical, link that basically brings the Internet together. For example a major backbone could run from the west coast to the east coast. Providers like Sprint, AT&T, UUNet, ELI, etc.. provide access to their backbones to what we generally consider an ISP via T1 or T3m etc...

The image from me to binrev.com shows that my backbone provider is Comcast, as they are also my ISP. With cable and telco infrastructures the line between a local ISP and backbone provider is getting blurred.

There are several type of backbone providers as well. I once worked for a company that offered a link from the US to Europe (and UK to USA) over their high-speed satellite links. They were considered a backbone provider.

http://www.nationmaster.com/encyclopedia/Internet-backbone

EDIT: ip address

EDIT: think of it as a Unix file system. / is a fiber-optic backbone. /dev, /home, /etc are you local ISP . You are passwd or resolv.conf. Hope that is a good analogy.

EDIT: Added a few more links:

http://www.smartcomputing.com/editorial/ar...6.asp&guid=

http://www.unt.edu/UNT/departments/CC/Benc...ma97/ibkbon.htm

http://www.jameslynch.com/Internet.swf

EDIT: to get the entire article from the first link the site must be entered from Google. Or your browser needs to be recognized as a Google spider with its User-Agent string.

Edited by tekio
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That's a very interesting question I've never had an answer to. I'll read those links.

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I used to work at an ISP/CLEC. We had two OC3's of incoming data. One from Sprint and one from UUNET(now verizon business). We had our own ip blocks from ARIN, We did our own routing, and operated our own servers. We would then sell bandwidth and services in smaller bits, connecting to customers in various ways, most commonly t1s. We even had smaller ISPs getting bandwidth and other services from us.

The point is that if you want to be an ISP you still need to buy from a bigger ISP. The top level ISPs are there because they own wires and switching centers. These top level ISPs have peering agreements with each other for passing data back and forth between their networks. AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, xo communications, and level3 are some that I can think of off the top of my head.

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So would it be possible to just go straight to a top level ISP, and if so, would it be cheaper?

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So would it be possible to just go straight to a top level ISP, and if so, would it be cheaper?

Only if you installed a cable that goes straight there...

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So would it be possible to just go straight to a top level ISP, and if so, would it be cheaper?

Yes, so long as you could afford something like a T3 or higher. To cut out a company operating like residential ISP would be like going to Coca Cola directly and purchasing soda in cases by the dozen.

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