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brymstone

Stay Paranoid!

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Stay paranoid with very good reason. Big Brother looms larger than ever. The UK government plans to spend £12 billion (it has billions to spare at a time like this?) on storing every email, landline and mobile phone call/message, and all your browsing activities in a central database. Place your bets now as to how long it will be before huge chunks of data end up on portable storage devices on eBay, left on public transport, or worse.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/World/B...how/3563787.cms

Edited by brym
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From kill switches in cars to record numbers of surveillance cameras, no true paranoid should be living in the U.K, anyway. There's no telling what they will come up with next. At least in practice, that country is diametrically opposed to privacy.

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I've said it before, and I'll say it again, Orwell was a prophet for turning England into Oceania.

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Place your bets now as to how long it will be before huge chunks of data end up on portable storage devices on eBay, left on public transport, or worse.

I always think that.

I just find it so funny that so many people do not think about that when things like this happen.

My job is to secure things and I have seen some places where I think, "All this data is unprotected...I wounder how long it has been like that...I wounder who has been in this system and found this gold mine of peoples personal data...I wounder what would happen if someone with evil intent got a hold of this???"

The more I secure the more I learn just how unsecured data like this is.

biosphear

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I bet you about a few months too a year. Its gonna be hard info to find though. As much as I hate to admit it those techies in britain know what there doin. They wont just put stuff out there for nothin. Better get your wallet ready (you rich cracker/serious ASSho#@! :ninja:

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I was reading this http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/security/soa/...9292431,00.htm: this morning.. The fourth paragraph from the bottom really caught my attention..

For those you you who can't get the link to work:

There's a colon appended on the end.

http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/security/soa/...9292431,00.htm

opps... my bad... Thanks for catching that.

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Living in Britain I am surprised to hear that we do have the money to spend on storing activities on a database, with all the market trouble.

I am paranoid enough to be sensible and vigilant with my data, without it becoming a time-consuming issue. I did see in this article that is was "reported by the Sunday Times." This is a national newspaper who use the word Hacker as a buzz word and are hardly the info source I would trust for future government plans or computer related news.

I would take all of this with a giant pinch of salt, and just keep your data secure.

It's not, I didn't enjoy reading the topic, it's just that taking future government-tech news from the Times is like taking "the meaning of hacking" from Sarah Palin.

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Guys, I have a question.

When we talk about the government level and data hiding, it is quite clear that we cannot rely on an defence/encryption system that cannot withstand the work of "serious" guys.

So, when protecting my data, sending email, chatting on msn etc, what kind of defence is enough to _really_ protect the data? Or, at least, to make them spend several years brute-forcing my password with all their computers?

Specifically, I wanna know this:

-Is WinRAR of version 3.2+ reliable with a strong password, let's say, 20 chars long?

-Is MS Word 2003 Protection reliable and which method of encryption is better?

-Is EAS function in MySQL reliable on the same condition?

-And finally, how do we protect out emails?

-Thanx

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So, when protecting my data, sending email, chatting on msn etc, what kind of defence is enough to _really_ protect the data? Or, at least, to make them spend several years brute-forcing my password with all their computers?

Most encryption algorithms require quite long passwords to be as secure as they can get. Generally, the longer your key phrase is, the better your security is.

As for which algorithm to use, NSA has this to say about AES:

The design and strength of all key lengths of the AES algorithm (i.e., 128, 192 and 256) are sufficient to protect classified information up to the SECRET level. TOP SECRET information will require use of either the 192 or 256 key lengths.

So it is quite secure.

-Is WinRAR of version 3.2+ reliable with a strong password, let's say, 20 chars long?

Most attacks on WinRAR passworded archives I've seen were done by dictionary attacks, so yes, I'd say that for anyone without a computer cluster, it would be hard to crack such password. There are better ways of securing your data than WinRAR, though.

-And finally, how do we protect out emails?

Asymmetric cryptography would be your best choice. There are many software packages that allow you to do this, like GPG.

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in the uk we have about 3 or 4 stories a week about lost data on discs and laptops atm, it's quite a good combination - the government stores as much data as possible then they go and sell/lose/give it away lol. 1000s of innocent people have their dna and fingerprints stored too, more than anywhere else i think.

my pr0n is safer than the average uk government database, i can sleep better at least knowing that :P

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