kiltux

need a good linux for starting with linux

28 posts in this topic

This is how far i have come,

i tried linux slackware but it was a little bit to hard for me, i had problems with wireless getting to work and had problems with installing programs, so i'm looking for a linux, that is good for learning, but i'm not looking for a linux that does everything for you i really want to work with the console, so i appriciate any help

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But i think the best way to learn it, is to use a hard linux, but not that hard like slackware, but i like a kde interface.

If you can give me some slackware links that would be great.

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There was once a whirly whirlgoblin whose name was Fredgob. Fredgob wanted to learn how to nail a shrunken head to his door to keep away the evil shrobstins from his shed. He asked many different things around him. He asked the daisies, the trees, the empty boxes of cereal at the dump. He even asked his toenails. He thought to himself, "how do I nail a shrunken head to my door?" Within time, he found a fairy and asked it the question that haunted his tiny, purple brain. The fairy told him about Google. He instantly realized Google was the answer. However, it was too late. The evil shrobstins attacked his tiny shed. "Maybe next time I should consult the oracle, which is Google," he thought as he sat in the fetal position, sobbing.

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There was once a whirly whirlgoblin whose name was Fredgob. Fredgob wanted to learn how to nail a shrunken head to his door to keep away the evil shrobstins from his shed. He asked many different things around him. He asked the daisies, the trees, the empty boxes of cereal at the dump. He even asked his toenails. He thought to himself, "how do I nail a shrunken head to my door?" Within time, he found a fairy and asked it the question that haunted his tiny, purple brain. The fairy told him about Google. He instantly realized Google was the answer. However, it was too late. The evil shrobstins attacked his tiny shed. "Maybe next time I should consult the oracle, which is Google," he thought as he sat in the fetal position, sobbing.

This is a question google can't really answer. He's looking for recommendations, something that comes from an actual human being. Since he asked here, he's looking for recommendations that come from the human beings that frequent these forums.

I'd recommend Ubuntu. It's good, both for beginners and experienced users. Most of the time it just works and is polished. It's also not bloated like Fedora or SuSE. A single CD is all you need to install.

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There was once a whirly whirlgoblin whose name was Fredgob. Fredgob wanted to learn how to nail a shrunken head to his door to keep away the evil shrobstins from his shed. He asked many different things around him. He asked the daisies, the trees, the empty boxes of cereal at the dump. He even asked his toenails. He thought to himself, "how do I nail a shrunken head to my door?" Within time, he found a fairy and asked it the question that haunted his tiny, purple brain. The fairy told him about Google. He instantly realized Google was the answer. However, it was too late. The evil shrobstins attacked his tiny shed. "Maybe next time I should consult the oracle, which is Google," he thought as he sat in the fetal position, sobbing.

This is a question google can't really answer. He's looking for recommendations, something that comes from an actual human being. Since he asked here, he's looking for recommendations that come from the human beings that frequent these forums.

I'd recommend Ubuntu. It's good, both for beginners and experienced users. Most of the time it just works and is polished. It's also not bloated like Fedora or SuSE. A single CD is all you need to install.

I completely agree. Ubuntu is a great learning distro, it also has a live cd :D.

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FreeBSD

For beginners, PC-BSD is probably a better choice. As far as Linux goes, Unubtu.

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I with everyone else with Ubuntu. I tried fedora and had some issues. I did finally get it to run smoothly but it took a month of headaches. The few things I had problems with in Ubuntu was video card, I have a older card that just does not like Advanced desktop effects. I also had problems with sharing a drive but found out that I had never actually formated the drive. I use ubuntu as my main system and a home server. And I am building a new mythbuntu box, this has gone on for a few months, I just keep putting it off.

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Add another vote for Ubuntu, here. Its by far one of the most user-friendly distros out there, and has a huge user/fanbase. The support forums move really fast though, so the "search" tool is your friend for any problem. I think every problem you'll face as a new linux user has been covered at least 20 times before there.

And just in case you're still sitting on the fence:

"The definitive dual-booting guide: Linux, Vista, and XP"

http://apcmag.com/the_definitive_dualbooti..._stepbystep.htm

IMO, that is one of the best tutorials you will ever find.

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So i think is clear then, ubuntu it is :P, thanks for your recommodation everyone

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So i think is clear then, ubuntu it is :P, thanks for your recommodation everyone

Remember that it is just a recommendation. Though I suggest sticking with your first choice for quite some time, even if you have problems. The "switching distros will fix all my problems" mindset won't get you anywhere. However, once you get your bearings in the Linux world, you may feel the need to start trying other distros. I'd put this off for some time though as without some experience, it's difficult to appreciate the differences in the distros beyond the user interface.

Remember, have fun :)

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I agree, but i'm using windows now and i like it alot, but for experience and school, i also want to learn how to work with linux and try to get to the same level of experience as i have with windows.

and it is always fun to learn things :D

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I agree, but i'm using windows now and i like it alot, but for experience and school, i also want to learn how to work with linux and try to get to the same level of experience as i have with windows.

and it is always fun to learn things :D

I would recommend using Ubuntu on a system you will actually be using as you would your Windows PC. Also, pick either Slackware or Gentoo to run in a VM. for educational purposes. That way you will gain experience using Linux as a Desktop system while either Slackware or Gentoo will force you to learn Linux.

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I wanted to ask a question about nearly the same thing but didn't want to start a new thread. I have been using Ubuntu for a while and I think I am ready to change to a more difficult distro. I was thinking Gentoo. But Zeph told me it might be a bit too hard. He said I have to compile the whole thing from scratch. Is it true that this might be hard for me? I just want your opinions.

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I wanted to ask a question about nearly the same thing but didn't want to start a new thread. I have been using Ubuntu for a while and I think I am ready to change to a more difficult distro. I was thinking Gentoo. But Zeph told me it might be a bit too hard. He said I have to compile the whole thing from scratch. Is it true that this might be hard for me? I just want your opinions.

Yes, most everything is compiled from scratch. However, Gentoo has an excellent manual dedicated to it's installation. The user is walked through the entire installation process step by step. If one desired Gentoo could probably be installed by cutting and pasting commands from the tutorial (assuming it is in a VM).

Heck, why bother to ask? Not to flame, but go for it and give it a try!

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Thanks for the input. I will do that first thing in the morning. I have never used virtual machines though. What are the practical uses of them?

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Thanks for the input. I will do that first thing in the morning. I have never used virtual machines though. What are the practical uses of them?

For someone learning about computer security, networking, or programming the possibilities are endless. Virtual machines will allow a student to run software with major security flaws in a controlled environment while testing it. When developing applications VMs provide the ability to test code across several OS versions without spending a fortune for hardware. Imagine wanting to learn about administrating a windows network, using an advanced version of Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris. Without virtual machines five different computers would be needed. With vm software one could just get a single higher end system and still have more flexibility.

Edit: VMs are also far superior over dual-booting as a means to make hardware more efficient. When dual booting hardware supported by two completely different operating systems must be obtained. It is possible to plot different possibilities as well. For example an NT domain with a PDC, BDC, Vista client, Windows XP client, and a Linux file server. Even when dual booting different operating systems a minimum of five computers would be needed.

Edited by tekio
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Oh, I see now. And reading that makes me want to start using them. What is the best VM software. I have heard of so many.

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Oh, I see now. And reading that makes me want to start using them. What is the best VM software. I have heard of so many.

VMware workstation IMO is the best. It does cost $$$, but VMware makes very good software and designs guest software for several different operating systems including FreeBSD and Solaris. Parallels makes decent VM software as well, but they often lag behind when making guest software to support Unix. On the free side there is Virtualbox (i haven't tried it yet), Qemu, and Microsoft's Virtual PC.

If one has the money to spare VMware workstation is the way to go. All minor upgrades are complimentary and every major revision is worth $100. Also, there is more support for VMware Workstation than most others. VMware Workstation has a full featured 30-day trial as well.

EDIT: VMware also has a freeware application called VMware player. This can run any (i think) VM created with VMware Workstation. Many people will post torrents of Unixes that are compatible with VMware Player. One could also use the 30-day trial of Workstation to make Windows VMs and use the freeware once the trial period expires. I'm sure there are several other limitations of VMware Player too.

Edited by tekio
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VMware player blows, it seems like a simple, lightweight virtualization solution until you realize that it provides such limited functionality, it's not even worth using. Vmware Server, however, is freeware and excellent. It may seem like slight overkill running it on a desktop machine, but it provides a nice amount of useful and easy-to-use features.

Never used VirtualBox, but its seamless desktop integration looks awesome.

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I love vmware workstation. I own a copy for Windows. It makes life worth living.

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