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Leopard as a guest in a Virtual Machine

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Was just looking for some suggestions on how I could run MacOS in a virtual machine as the guest OS with Windows Vista as the host. Would be really cool if I could do this with Virtual PC since it's free. Has anyone done this or have any suggestions?

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You should check the osx86 project, but I think they only show how to do it with VMware. Get the VMware player and google for guides on how to create your own virtual machines so that they can be used by the VMware player (VMware workstation can create virtual machines with the player cannot). Ultimately, just buy a mac mini.

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I frequently do this the other way around: run windows as a guest from my mac. Works like a charm. I suggest getting a mac, because then you have all possible options at your fingertips and it's _easy_ to do everything. You've got VM support for everything, and bootcamp for dual booting to whatever. It's a balanced decision!

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I frequently do this the other way around: run windows as a guest from my mac. Works like a charm. I suggest getting a mac, because then you have all possible options at your fingertips and it's _easy_ to do everything. You've got VM support for everything, and bootcamp for dual booting to whatever. It's a balanced decision!

cough.....fanboy...cough :D

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I frequently do this the other way around: run windows as a guest from my mac. Works like a charm. I suggest getting a mac, because then you have all possible options at your fingertips and it's _easy_ to do everything. You've got VM support for everything, and bootcamp for dual booting to whatever. It's a balanced decision!

cough.....fanboy...cough :D

UP YOUR NOSE WITH A RUBBER HOSE

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Subversus, WTH is that thing in your avatar. It's weird! :omfg:

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Actually, someone figured how to install OS X inside vmware, and made a torrent of it (not that I endorse downloading anything illegal or anything like that...). They pretended they were installing FreeBSD, cause I guess OS X is a similar operating system, and it seems to work. On my computer it was very very slow for some reason, even when I give it 1gb of ram, and I never got networking working, which is pretty essential, but I also didn't spend too much time trying. I was using a linux host, but a windows host should work fine.

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Actually, someone figured how to install OS X inside vmware, and made a torrent of it. (not that I endorse downloading anything illegal or anything like that...). They pretended they were installing FreeBSD, cause I guess OS X is a similar operating system, and it seems to work. On my computer it was very very slow for some reason, even when I give it 1gb of ram, and I never got networking working, which is pretty essential, but I also didn't spend too much time trying. I was using a linux host, but a windows host should work fine.

Mac OS X has a built-in system that checks for a special chip that comes only with the real intel macs. As a non-Apple PC does not have the chip, you should not be able to install OS X on it. That's where the OSX86 project comes in, they've modified OSX install CDs to remove the check for the Apple chip, therefore allowing the OS to be installed on non-Apple hardware. But then, you have to get hardware that is Apple compatible, as no drivers are provided for hardware that was not supposed to be in a mac. The removal of the Apple hardware check is not the only thing done by the OSX86 project, they've also made patches that allow CPUs that have no SSE3 support to be able to run OSX86. Normally, OSX86 requires a CPU with SSE3, but with the patch, all SSE3 calls are replaced by SSE2 calls, which allows a far greater range of CPUs to be used. I think they've also made a patch to support AMD processors.

This project is interesting, but its usage very often involves warez. Most people get the prepatched iso from bittorrent, without buying the software. Even if you did buy OS X and then patched it by yourself, I'm wondering if this would be legal. You'd still be cracking software to do something Apple did not want you to, I'm pretty sure that would be against their terms of usage.

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You mean.. AWESOME??

Also, it's a Kelet.

PS: Yeah, it's against apple's terms of service to install OS X on a non apple computer. Most people don't seem to care too much, though, and I doubt Apple'd send their goons after you unless you used it for commercial purposes and they found out.

Still, you should just get a mac. Plus, every time you do, some dude calls you up and goes "Dude... you're gettin' a MAC!!"

Subversus, WTH is that thing in your avatar. It's weird! :omfg:
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VMware Workstation 5.5 worked with the older 10.4 VM images.

I tried out one of those 10.4 VMware machines a while back on an AMD Athlon64 3500+ with 2 GB RAM, and the results were less than stellar. 10.4 in the VM with 1.5 GB of RAM allowed for it was slower than 10.4 on an actual Mac, 800 MHz G3 with 256 MB RAM. The Leopard x86 VM is supposed to be a /lot/ faster, especially if you have a processor that supports SSE3 -- that seems to be the big performance difference. Still, as mentioned, if you want to actually use OS X, you should probably just get a secondhand Mac. You can get a mid-level dual processor G4 that will run Leopard for under $150 anymore.

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PS: Yeah, it's against apple's terms of service to install OS X on a non apple computer. Most people don't seem to care too much, though, and I doubt Apple'd send their goons after you unless you used it for commercial purposes and they found out.

Breaking terms of service doesn't necessarily mean you're breaking the law, right? :roll:

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PS: Yeah, it's against apple's terms of service to install OS X on a non apple computer. Most people don't seem to care too much, though, and I doubt Apple'd send their goons after you unless you used it for commercial purposes and they found out.

Breaking terms of service doesn't necessarily mean you're breaking the law, right? :roll:

Yeah, it does mean breaking the law (correct me if I'm wrong). If Apple wanted to, they could sue people that do not respect their terms of service. If you do not agree with some software's terms of service, you should not use it. For example, most software will say that you are not allowed to reverse engineer the software. For example, if you publish a crack for that software, you obviously reverse engineered it and you also provide material that allows illegal copying of the software. Could they sue you for that? Of course.

Do you remember DeCSS? Were people sued? Yeah.

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PS: Yeah, it's against apple's terms of service to install OS X on a non apple computer. Most people don't seem to care too much, though, and I doubt Apple'd send their goons after you unless you used it for commercial purposes and they found out.

Breaking terms of service doesn't necessarily mean you're breaking the law, right? :roll:

Yeah, it does mean breaking the law (correct me if I'm wrong). If Apple wanted to, they could sue people that do not respect their terms of service. If you do not agree with some software's terms of service, you should not use it. For example, most software will say that you are not allowed to reverse engineer the software. For example, if you publish a crack for that software, you obviously reverse engineered it and you also provide material that allows illegal copying of the software. Could they sue you for that? Of course.

Do you remember DeCSS? Were people sued? Yeah.

That's because the DMCA was broken, not the terms of service. Technology vendors are not law-creating or law-enforcing organizations. Breaking terms of service does not necessarily mean you are breaking the law. Take for example an ISP that disallows in running a web server or proxy in their terms of service. They can kick you off of their service but they're not going to have you arrested because you're not breaking the law.

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PS: Yeah, it's against apple's terms of service to install OS X on a non apple computer. Most people don't seem to care too much, though, and I doubt Apple'd send their goons after you unless you used it for commercial purposes and they found out.

Breaking terms of service doesn't necessarily mean you're breaking the law, right? :roll:

Yeah, it does mean breaking the law (correct me if I'm wrong). If Apple wanted to, they could sue people that do not respect their terms of service. If you do not agree with some software's terms of service, you should not use it. For example, most software will say that you are not allowed to reverse engineer the software. For example, if you publish a crack for that software, you obviously reverse engineered it and you also provide material that allows illegal copying of the software. Could they sue you for that? Of course.

Do you remember DeCSS? Were people sued? Yeah.

That's because the DMCA was broken, not the terms of service. Technology vendors are not law-creating or law-enforcing organizations. Breaking terms of service does not necessarily mean you are breaking the law. Take for example an ISP that disallows in running a web server or proxy in their terms of service. They can kick you off of their service but they're not going to have you arrested because you're not breaking the law.

Yeah, you can get sued for DMCA violation. Is there a case where they could sue you for breaking their terms of service and not the DMCA? For example, people who buy MAC OS X and crack it to install it on their pc?

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Cracking OS X would probably still qualify as a breach of DMCA, and downloading a patched/cracked OS X x86 image certainly is. However, you could breach just the terms of service if you managed to find or create non-Apple hardware that could fool OS X into booting on it. A fully compatible clone, for example, running OS X, would be a breach of the TOS because you're running OS X on non-Apple hardware, even though you installed OS X with no modification to its programming.

MS did something like this way back in the DOS days...for a short while (I don't remember which version of Windows it was) you /had/ to have MS-DOS to run Windows. Of course, there are other DOS-compatible operating systems that would've run just fine with Windows, but Windows was checking to see if you had "real" MS-DOS. Mostly it was done to keep people from just using the IBM PC-DOS that came with their IBM machines to run Windows.

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