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thecriscoking

Programming Question

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I was just wondering what someone might need to know to program a device? (Ex. like a remote control for a RC car or something such as an MP3 player.) I understand the building of the device is needed first, but mainly the... interface?.. is what I'm wondering about. What sort of language would I need to know (if one is needed at all)?

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Well a remote control for an RC car isn't near the same as an mp3 player. As for the remote control example, I'm pretty sure that can be done explicitly through circuitry, different signals hitting different receivers triggering different circuits.

As far as the mp3 player, it would need a media type (flash, sd, etc) and a way to read that media, and if you planned on having some sort of digital display something to interface with that as well. I believe this can be hard-wired for the most part, but there is sure to be some sort of embedded programming involved. As for the embedded programming, its not for all devices, except those which integrate with computers (for the most part). The best languages to learn embedded programming in are C and assembly.

Hope this helps.

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Thank alot, RETN. That was what I needed. I was planning on learning ASSEMBLY becuase I've heard of it's perks over C/C++. I know it will be a much harder learn but the soul is willing.

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Assembly has few advantages over C. Even on small machines (such as Atmel AVR microcontrollers), you don't get much more out of assembly than with C. The only places where assembly would need to be used on systems like the AVR is really tight interrupt routines where you may only have a few hundred cycle to get something done before the next interrupt. Modern C compilers are also quite good at optimization, unless you're really good at assembly programming and have an intimate knowledge of the machine, it's not likely you're going to write faster code anyway.

I'm not going to answer your original question, it's a poorly thought out question that's frankly so far down the road for you, you don't even know how to ask it. Go get a microcontroller if this is the type of programming you want to do. The Arduino is nice, but there are other boards and microcontrollers you could use. Learn C on a PC though, microcontrollers present their own unique set of problems when they must be debugged.

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Assembly has few advantages over C. Even on small machines (such as Atmel AVR microcontrollers), you don't get much more out of assembly than with C. The only places where assembly would need to be used on systems like the AVR is really tight interrupt routines where you may only have a few hundred cycle to get something done before the next interrupt. Modern C compilers are also quite good at optimization, unless you're really good at assembly programming and have an intimate knowledge of the machine, it's not likely you're going to write faster code anyway.

I'm not going to answer your original question, it's a poorly thought out question that's frankly so far down the road for you, you don't even know how to ask it. Go get a microcontroller if this is the type of programming you want to do. The Arduino is nice, but there are other boards and microcontrollers you could use. Learn C on a PC though, microcontrollers present their own unique set of problems when they must be debugged.

Well then, nevermind about the ASSEMBLY. C it is. I understand where you're coming from about answering my question. I still have much to learn. So you're saying I should learn C first and work from there?

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Assembly has few advantages over C. Even on small machines (such as Atmel AVR microcontrollers), you don't get much more out of assembly than with C. The only places where assembly would need to be used on systems like the AVR is really tight interrupt routines where you may only have a few hundred cycle to get something done before the next interrupt. Modern C compilers are also quite good at optimization, unless you're really good at assembly programming and have an intimate knowledge of the machine, it's not likely you're going to write faster code anyway.

I'm not going to answer your original question, it's a poorly thought out question that's frankly so far down the road for you, you don't even know how to ask it. Go get a microcontroller if this is the type of programming you want to do. The Arduino is nice, but there are other boards and microcontrollers you could use. Learn C on a PC though, microcontrollers present their own unique set of problems when they must be debugged.

Well then, nevermind about the ASSEMBLY. C it is. I understand where you're coming from about answering my question. I still have much to learn. So you're saying I should learn C first and work from there?

I don't know if that's what he says.. but that's what I am doing.

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As has been pointed out, there is not a lot of advantages with ASM over C other that size of binary (which is important when coding embedded device ), but i would add, that your best bet is to try them both, as some coders (including myself ) find ASM easier than C, it's just depend on how your brain works.

Edited by Dex
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As has been pointed out, there is not a lot of advantages with ASM other C other that size of binary (which is important when coding embedded device ), but i would add, that your best bet is to try them both, as some coders (including myself ) find ASM easier than C, it's just depend on how your brain works.

wow, hardcore

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