Irongeek

Ironkey on the way, what do you want to see in the video?

22 posts in this topic

Hi all,

I've got an Ironkey ( https://www.ironkey.com/ ) on the way, I plan to do a video, so what all do you want me to show off? I know I want to show:

*Setup an initializing of keys.

*Mounting under Windows and Linux.

*Their version of Tor (Secure Sessions)

*Their password manager.

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What size did you get?

I'd like to see if the self destruct actually works

and just how tough are these things? Can we run them over with a car? submerse them in water? etc etc

Maybe test the secure backup?

Test read\write speeds

Hope this helps

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Well, I won't test the self destruct :) , but everything else I plan to comment on. I got the 1GB Personal.

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An IronKey is definitely on my shopping list .. I can't wait to see your video. The topics you mentioned are exactly what I'd like to see too.

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Looking forward to this video, keep up the good work. I've been away from IT Security a while and your videos have been immensely helpful in playing catch-up. Not sure how long I've been gone, but when I dusted off my trusty old cd wallet the most recent tool I found was PQWak if that tells you anything.

Thanks Irongeek, much of my current skillset (plus much of my laptop's current application set) can be largely attributed to your video-tutelage. Much appreciated, keep 'em coming :D

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If you do have access to a "scanning electron microscope" (whatever that is), you could always do a comparison between the results of scanning a normal USB stick, and the ironkey.

A "Scanning Electron Microscope" is one of a number of varieties of electron microscope, which use an electron beam to scan the surface of microscopic objects. They can typically view objects at around 2 Million X magnification, compared to 2000X magnification from a good light-microscope. I don't claim to understand that much about the differences between a Scanning Electron Microscope and any other variety (reflection, transmission, etc - wikipedia has a good writeup).

I think what they're going for here is that once you get through the sheet metal casing, and then through the epoxy filler to the memory chips, if you somehow manage to extract them without destroying them, their data is hardware-encrypted by an on-board encryption chip, which is heavily shielded, making it incredibly difficult to reverse engineer, monitor emissions (TEMPEST attack maybe?), etc.

All that said, maybe there are some resources I'm not aware of, but I doubt IronGeek has easy access to a Scanning Electron Microscope (they tend to be incredibly pricey), and even if he does, what they're talking about would require him to dismantle the device, carefully burrow through epoxy, desolder chips from their host board, remove their shielding (all this without damaging the delicate encryption chip itself) and then begin the amazingly complicated and costly process of scanning the exposed semiconductor using incredibly expensive and hard to find equipment.

This may be a bit beyond the scope of IronGeek's usual content, and while I personally would love to watch that video, I don't really see it happening ;)

Edited by Enmaku
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What Enmaku said. :)

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Flash not cool? Come on, it's a good standard every browser supports. I hate how Firefox interacts with media player and stuff, ugh. Oh, and Irongeek, you gotta try the self destruct! Put some files on there you hopefully backed up, and test the feature, and then use the software you once had a tutorial on recovering deleted material from drives. PhotoRec I think it was. I really wanna see how it does xD

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Flash not cool? Come on, it's a good standard every browser supports. I hate how Firefox interacts with media player and stuff, ugh. Oh, and Irongeek, you gotta try the self destruct! Put some files on there you hopefully backed up, and test the feature, and then use the software you once had a tutorial on recovering deleted material from drives. PhotoRec I think it was. I really wanna see how it does xD

You need to get out more... ;)

Unfortunately it's not only the "browser" that needs support, but the host operating system.. guess what? Adobe doesn't release flash for every OS or architecture.. now do they?

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The self destruct feature really bricks the device, there is no recovery. I'd rather not brick a $79 thumb drive.

As for Flash, I use it for three reasons:

1. I can embed click able links.

2. I can add links to my site, so that if some one rips off the video I still at least get some referral traffic.

3. Most folks already have Flash installed. There is a version for x86 Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X.

I'm not going to struggle to support an OS with a market share in the single digits. :)

Edited by Irongeek
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The self destruct feature really bricks the device, there is no recovery. I'd rather not brick a $79 thumb drive.

As for Flash, I use it for three reasons:

1. I can embed click able links.

2. I can add links to my site, so that if some one rips off the video I still at least get some referral traffic.

3. Most folks already have Flash installed. There is a version for x86 Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X.

I'm not going to struggle to support an OS with a market share in the single digits. :)

You're an ass.

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Thanks, I love you too. :)

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Thanks, I love you too. :)

I must have seen many hundreds of positive comments about your videos, so you must be doing something right. Keep on doing what you are doing, until you decide you are able to improve upon it.

As a matter of interest, my understanding of Ironkey is also that the destruct feature destroys the whole unit, not just the file(s) that are trying to be accessed. I can quite understand why you don't want to trash it, even though it may be a freebie!

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The self destruct feature really bricks the device, there is no recovery. I'd rather not brick a $79 thumb drive.

As for Flash, I use it for three reasons:

1. I can embed click able links.

2. I can add links to my site, so that if some one rips off the video I still at least get some referral traffic.

3. Most folks already have Flash installed. There is a version for x86 Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X.

I'm not going to struggle to support an OS with a market share in the single digits. :)

You're an ass.

What Browser or OS are you using without flash to view his stuff?

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Lol, I completely agree with Irongeek, Flash is supported on everything big. And I'm sorry, I need to do my damn research. I didn't know the device actually #&$s itself up xD I thought it would cause an instant overwrite of 00 or something. Sorry, I understand why you wouldn't want to trash a $79 device. xD

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BSD doesn't have an Adobe Flash release...and while there are ways (32-bit chroot or dual libraries) to run Adobe Flash under 64-bit Linux, it's not as straightforward as 32-bit Linux. I'd venture there's no support for Plan 9, BeOS, etc, either. They do support Solaris nowadays.

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Yah, setting up Flash on my 64bit Ubuntu was sorta a hassle....

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I think what they're going for here is that once you get through the sheet metal casing, and then through the epoxy filler to the memory chips, if you somehow manage to extract them without destroying them, their data is hardware-encrypted by an on-board encryption chip, which is heavily shielded, making it incredibly difficult to reverse engineer

I first heard of that kind of attack a few months ago when (and my memory sucks, apologies) Sky/Murdoch went to court over hiring "hackers" to "reverse engineer competitors viewing cards". The guy was a genius and used some painful-looking chemicals and specialist microscopes to get under that epoxy for figuring out competitors' code. I'm sure I saw a video with him saying it's easy - he loves it and surely he's not the only one. IronKey sounded pretty safe to me :)

Tenchi

P.S. If anyone can post/PM links to news stories or videos relating to that court case, please do. All my bookmarks 404 and searching for the sparse facts I remember brings up nothing. *wears tinfoil hat with wild abandon*

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