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Demonic_angel

College

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Well, I went to my College today to change my major. Check out this conversation I had with IT people.

"Hello this is the network help desk, how may I help you?"

"Yes, I was wondering about the rules concerning what kinds of websites and programs I could have on my computer."

"Like what?"

"Well, I go to this one site (Binrev of course) that is good for helping with computer problems and small projects. I have a C++ IDE, some DVD decrypt programs, tor, uTorrent, and other stuff."

"So... What kinda stuff are you asking about?"

"What kind of sites can you go to and what programs are prohibited from your personal computer?"

"Oh.. Well if the site is blocked it will be barracuda blocked. Torrents and peer to peer programs are not allowed because the school is liable. What is an IDE?"

"It allows me to create my own programs."

After that it was about five minutes of useless babble where he politely told me he really didn't now about what was allowed and not.

So, I assume Binrev will be blocked and I will have to file a report and lobby for the site to be unblocked. But really, nearly campus wide high speed wireless access, and not very competent workers. But I suppose that is expected. I think they are just student workers there while the IT guy is on vacation.

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I can't imagine that your college would block Binary Revolution. Is this a large school or a small school?

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So so I suppose. About 7 to 10 thousand people in the school and outlying community so however big that is. I don't know if it is blocked for sure but I figure the filter will hit on the "hack" words and junk. If it is not then yay! But I bet it is. My school had it blocked. ( Of course my school had wikipedia blocked for a while to. -_-)

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I work as an intern for a fairly massive silicon company. The only site they block that I know of is 2600.com :)

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My college too block binrev..the damn sonicwall blocks binrev under "hacking and proxy avoidance" category.....

I use programs like tor and ultrasurf to bypass that firewall :)

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if they block it why you dont just use a proxy or a tunnel...?

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I can understand blocking Torrent sites because of the legal ramifications, but I don't get how a college can censor web access to sites like Binrev. That's inhibiting students from gaining knowledge, sharing information, and it's censoring free speech. How can you write a research paper about a subject when you can't access a particular site from campus? Those kind of policies wouldn't fair very well at my college. :pissed:

Edited by t3st.s3t
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I can understand blocking Torrent sites because of the legal ramifications, but I don't get how a college can censor web access to sites like Binrev. That's inhibiting students from gaining knowledge, sharing information, and it's censoring free speech. How can you write a research paper about a subject when you can't access a particular site from campus? Those kind of policies wouldn't fair very well at my college.

You have to be very careful with your terminology there.

A college preventing students from accessing certain websites on its Internet connection is *not* censorship in any way. They are simply ensuring that their own usage policies are being followed. They are not preventing you from using any other means to connect to the Internet; they are simply covering their own backsides, as they are the ones who are liable for how the connection is used. This is not unlike what you would find in a business setting. They pay the bill, they decide how it can be used.

For real censorship, take some time to read about what the Chinese government does to ISPs in that country. Their policy is, in short, "You will only allow customers to view sites we approve of. If you do not follow these rules, we will lock both you and your customer in a room and throw away the room."

For web filtering, if you find that there are sites that provide legitimate content for your classwork that you cannot access, your best bet is to contact the school's technology department and see if you can speak to someone about getting the sites white-listed. Ordinarily, they don't spend all their time adding sites one by one; they rely on whatever categories are established by the filtering software they use. So, if you can demonstrate that a given site provides information that you need (and be courteous about it, since they really don't "owe" it to you), chances are that they will open it up.

But, for example, they may not think that www.boobies.com is a legitimate site for breast cancer research.

("No, no! It's important that I review several dozen *healthy* specimens so I can understand the full effects of the medical condition!")

Anyway, at the end of the day, they can determine what you use their Internet pipe for. Getting used to that is good practice for the rest of your life. :)

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Well, I went to my College today to change my major. Check out this conversation I had with IT people.

"Hello this is the network help desk, how may I help you?"

"Yes, I was wondering about the rules concerning what kinds of websites and programs I could have on my computer."

"Like what?"

"Well, I go to this one site (Binrev of course) that is good for helping with computer problems and small projects. I have a C++ IDE, some DVD decrypt programs, tor, uTorrent, and other stuff."

"So... What kinda stuff are you asking about?"

"What kind of sites can you go to and what programs are prohibited from your personal computer?"

"Oh.. Well if the site is blocked it will be barracuda blocked. Torrents and peer to peer programs are not allowed because the school is liable. What is an IDE?"

"It allows me to create my own programs."

After that it was about five minutes of useless babble where he politely told me he really didn't now about what was allowed and not.

So, I assume Binrev will be blocked and I will have to file a report and lobby for the site to be unblocked. But really, nearly campus wide high speed wireless access, and not very competent workers. But I suppose that is expected. I think they are just student workers there while the IT guy is on vacation.

dude hastleing the help desk guys is a waste of time, they are just college students making minimum wage trying to pass a little time by helping the long island girls and the hollister fags with their facebook applications. They don't know network policies because they don't administer them. Its the IT guys that are NOT on vacation, they are in a basement somewhere you just don't see them because they have bigger things to worry about than you visiting a 'malicious' website and to be honest, the question you asked them is kinda stupid from an IT perspective in the first place...

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My work blocks binrev at the proxy. Luckily, the way the network is set up I don't have to use the proxy to connect to the internet. My guess is that binrev made it on to one of those lists of questionable sites.

EDIT: If you went through the hassle of calling in, why not just come out and ask them to unblock binrev? Actually the page saying it is blocked probably mentions a procedure for how to request something be unblocked.

Edited by Lord Wud
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I can understand blocking Torrent sites because of the legal ramifications, but I don't get how a college can censor web access to sites like Binrev. That's inhibiting students from gaining knowledge, sharing information, and it's censoring free speech. How can you write a research paper about a subject when you can't access a particular site from campus? Those kind of policies wouldn't fair very well at my college.

You have to be very careful with your terminology there.

A college preventing students from accessing certain websites on its Internet connection is *not* censorship in any way. They are simply ensuring that their own usage policies are being followed. They are not preventing you from using any other means to connect to the Internet; they are simply covering their own backsides, as they are the ones who are liable for how the connection is used. This is not unlike what you would find in a business setting. They pay the bill, they decide how it can be used.

For real censorship, take some time to read about what the Chinese government does to ISPs in that country. Their policy is, in short, "You will only allow customers to view sites we approve of. If you do not follow these rules, we will lock both you and your customer in a room and throw away the room."

For web filtering, if you find that there are sites that provide legitimate content for your classwork that you cannot access, your best bet is to contact the school's technology department and see if you can speak to someone about getting the sites white-listed. Ordinarily, they don't spend all their time adding sites one by one; they rely on whatever categories are established by the filtering software they use. So, if you can demonstrate that a given site provides information that you need (and be courteous about it, since they really don't "owe" it to you), chances are that they will open it up.

But, for example, they may not think that www.boobies.com is a legitimate site for breast cancer research.

("No, no! It's important that I review several dozen *healthy* specimens so I can understand the full effects of the medical condition!")

Anyway, at the end of the day, they can determine what you use their Internet pipe for. Getting used to that is good practice for the rest of your life. :)

agreed. I am in college for the 3rd year now and i had a roommate my sophomore year that was expelled for going to mini nova to look up songs. He also isn't allowed to attend and state colleges in the us ever again. my suggestions would be find some one that uses all of the programs and such you wanna use and see what they think ( i would suggest at least a junior.) Also, if anyone say that binrev condoles illegal activities refer them to the terms and conditions and they will revoke their punishment or w/e, that happened to me.

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My university is awesome: I'm accessing binrev from it right now!

As far as I can tell there are no websites blocked (not even 2600). torrents don't work because of some issue to do with port forwarding but there is an internal file sharing system that lets students living on campus share stuff with each other at high speed.

We also have a forest...and ducks!

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Oblivion: I could easily use a proxy or tunnel it but I really don't wanna get kicked out and "Black Listed".

Remix: I wasn't hassling them. I asked politely and was patient. And how was that a stupid question? I wasn't present for the Do and Don't of Networking meeting they had and needed to know before I got up there.

Lord Wud: I don't know 100% if Binrev is blocked or not. I am assuming because every where else I have gone, the site is blocked. I asked the help desk about how to unblock it and they told me I had to goto the web page and use the link provided and fill out the profile it takes me to.

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Come on man.. You're smart.. but of course, you're a college student! I'm sure you could figure out a way to bypass this..

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Colleges should not be blocking Binrev...BUT just because it's blocked, doesn't mean that the IT department personally blocked it. Every time I visit Binrev using a computer that isn't mine, something usually comes up labeling it as a dangerous or malicious site. I'm sure there was a pre-built blacklist before the IT department even the system up. (which probably listed Binrev) Which means you can probably get it unblocked if the IT department looks at it.

Also, IMHO, it's just not worth the risk of getting kicked out of the college just to be able to get on Binrev.

edit: spelling mistake

Edited by Forerunner
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See if you can get a job working in your colleges Networking or It department.

I'm hoping for a position at my University's Help Desk, which should get me escalated privileges. Plus it's always nice to be on the good side of the guys who would otherwise expel you if you got caught doing something "naughty" on the networks...

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I can understand blocking Torrent sites because of the legal ramifications, but I don't get how a college can censor web access to sites like Binrev. That's inhibiting students from gaining knowledge, sharing information, and it's censoring free speech. How can you write a research paper about a subject when you can't access a particular site from campus? Those kind of policies wouldn't fair very well at my college.

You have to be very careful with your terminology there.

A college preventing students from accessing certain websites on its Internet connection is *not* censorship in any way. They are simply ensuring that their own usage policies are being followed. They are not preventing you from using any other means to connect to the Internet; they are simply covering their own backsides, as they are the ones who are liable for how the connection is used. This is not unlike what you would find in a business setting. They pay the bill, they decide how it can be used.

For real censorship, take some time to read about what the Chinese government does to ISPs in that country. Their policy is, in short, "You will only allow customers to view sites we approve of. If you do not follow these rules, we will lock both you and your customer in a room and throw away the room."

For web filtering, if you find that there are sites that provide legitimate content for your classwork that you cannot access, your best bet is to contact the school's technology department and see if you can speak to someone about getting the sites white-listed. Ordinarily, they don't spend all their time adding sites one by one; they rely on whatever categories are established by the filtering software they use. So, if you can demonstrate that a given site provides information that you need (and be courteous about it, since they really don't "owe" it to you), chances are that they will open it up.

But, for example, they may not think that www.boobies.com is a legitimate site for breast cancer research.

("No, no! It's important that I review several dozen *healthy* specimens so I can understand the full effects of the medical condition!")

Anyway, at the end of the day, they can determine what you use their Internet pipe for. Getting used to that is good practice for the rest of your life. :)

What do you mean "Throw away the room?

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I can understand blocking Torrent sites because of the legal ramifications, but I don't get how a college can censor web access to sites like Binrev. That's inhibiting students from gaining knowledge, sharing information, and it's censoring free speech. How can you write a research paper about a subject when you can't access a particular site from campus? Those kind of policies wouldn't fair very well at my college.

You have to be very careful with your terminology there.

A college preventing students from accessing certain websites on its Internet connection is *not* censorship in any way. They are simply ensuring that their own usage policies are being followed. They are not preventing you from using any other means to connect to the Internet; they are simply covering their own backsides, as they are the ones who are liable for how the connection is used. This is not unlike what you would find in a business setting. They pay the bill, they decide how it can be used.

For real censorship, take some time to read about what the Chinese government does to ISPs in that country. Their policy is, in short, "You will only allow customers to view sites we approve of. If you do not follow these rules, we will lock both you and your customer in a room and throw away the room."

For web filtering, if you find that there are sites that provide legitimate content for your classwork that you cannot access, your best bet is to contact the school's technology department and see if you can speak to someone about getting the sites white-listed. Ordinarily, they don't spend all their time adding sites one by one; they rely on whatever categories are established by the filtering software they use. So, if you can demonstrate that a given site provides information that you need (and be courteous about it, since they really don't "owe" it to you), chances are that they will open it up.

But, for example, they may not think that www.boobies.com is a legitimate site for breast cancer research.

("No, no! It's important that I review several dozen *healthy* specimens so I can understand the full effects of the medical condition!")

Anyway, at the end of the day, they can determine what you use their Internet pipe for. Getting used to that is good practice for the rest of your life. :)

What do you mean "Throw away the room?

I think he means that no one will ever find you again. Plus its a pun based on "lock him up and throw away the key"

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I think he means that no one will ever find you again. Plus its a pun based on "lock him up and throw away the key"

Somehow, it's less funny when you have to explain it. :)

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I don't know if it is blocked for sure but I figure the filter will hit on the "hack" words

My old old school had the word "hacker" blocked... sucks huh?

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Yeah, I would love to work in University's computer help desk but I think it is reserved for Computer Science majors. Besides I am majoring in Chemistry and minoring in Physics. So class work is gonna be kinda of heavy. (In honors too because it came with one scholarship and no choice :( )

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I'm having a hard time getting my head around this whole blocking websites thing. I know that because they are providing you with the services, they can technically do what they wish--but blocking sites that are non-obscene/illegal? It seems like they are going to far. If you are a college student, there is an implied assumption that you are eighteen, or if not that you are at least intelligent to comply with website terms. That rules out blocking porn. The only reasonable thing i see is blocking known websites that promote extremely illegal activity or obscene material.

My school doesn't block any sites, except for those that are listed in the database of sites that attempt to install "malicious files" when you visit. I'm actually happy about this; it's the same kind of interface that google uses. As far as I've been able to tell, they don't block any websites based on material. You can access torrent sites, but they block you from downloading the actual torrent file and they block the ports for torrents. Obviously this can easily be circumvented, but it's not worth it when you can get 30+ mbps on a local DC++ hub with almost everything you need. That's the greatest advantage to attending a school with 15,000 people.

I would just set up tor. Also, I know this sounds stupid but you should try connecting on wireless. Some universities can be remarkably dumb when setting up the networks and subnets. For example, my school imposes a 7 gb external traffic per week bandwidth limit (local sharing does not apply). If you go over your limit, they cut your internet to dialup speeds. However, even if you've been listed as a bandwidth offender, you can access the internet at regular speeds by using the school's wireless or VPN. It's just something they forgot to think of and implement that people often exploit.

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I'm having a hard time getting my head around this whole blocking websites thing. I know that because they are providing you with the services, they can technically do what they wish--but blocking sites that are non-obscene/illegal? It seems like they are going to far. If you are a college student, there is an implied assumption that you are eighteen, or if not that you are at least intelligent to comply with website terms. That rules out blocking porn. The only reasonable thing i see is blocking known websites that promote extremely illegal activity or obscene material.

Since the university pays the bill for the bandwidth, they can pretty much do whatever they want. It doesn't have to make sense. :)

(They could say that you aren't allowed to access any sites that contain the letter "N", for example. They pay the bill, they make the rules.)

It is also the responsibility of the university to ensure, as best they can, that students are given an environment that engenders learning and advancement. Even though all students may be 18, allowing unrestricted access to porn sites would be detrimental to the study habits of many students, and it would be a black eye on the reputation if the school becomes known for students failing because they're looking at porn all day long. (Yes, I know, they should be disciplined enough to manage their own time. But why provide a risk?)

Also, for many students, this will be the first time that they are out of the immediate care of their parents. The parents need to know that they haven't just released their kids into the "jungle"; they want to know that the university is taking good care of their kids, not just letting them surf porn all day long.

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Well, I guess I'm just point out the obvious, but I would have Tor ready and running, and for file sharing, a lot of schools have things like DC++ running on the network so you will have sick speeds downloading stuff from everyone else xD. Have fun. God I wish I could fast forward to College/University.....

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