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rob1101

fastest distro

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I have used ubuntu for the longest time and I am just ready to move on. Ubuntu just seems bloated and slow to me. I did try debian but it came pre-installed with a bunch of apps. Maybe possibly I selected to install some unneeded options (I will give it another shot and post back here)

I really wanted to to try arch but it just simply would not work with my NIC. tried for weeks on arch forums but did not work.

I just want something stable, fast, and efficient. I don't need all of the eye candy or the bleeding edge of software. I just want something that works and that doesn't give me a bunch of stuff I don't want or need, but I want enough where I don't have to be at the terminal for two weeks. pretty much the philosophy of Arch :(

sorry if this is kind of vague and/or a common question, but I have to ask somewhere right?

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Debian should fit your needs perfectly.

You need to do a net install though.

This lets you set up a basic system and then choose which additional packages to install.

This gives you only what you want/need and nothing extra.

http://www.debian.org/CD/netinst/

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Saying 'Linux from scratch' probably won't help you much, but it's the right approach.... from what you've said you want the absolute minimum installed (rather running) on your machine.

Ubuntu Server would be a good start, however now days many applications has a huge amount of dependencies and are all written by geeks with vastly overpower machine so they don't see the issue related to slower machines.

Ubuntu 'Juice' also looks quite interesting, minimal system intended for VM-Ware:

http://www.ubuntu.com/products/whatisubunt...veredition/jeos

Mungewell.

PS for a fast light weight graphical system try Xubuntu/XFCE.

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Ubuntu is bloated and slow? Perhaps you need to try Fedora or SuSE to find out what bloated and slow really feel like.

Ubuntu is one of the lighter mainstream distros. As for "fastness", they're all more or less the same. They're all packaging the same software after all. Some distros like Arch or Gentoo are marginally slower from more frugal link dependencies and CPU-specific optimizations, but arch is Slackware-based (which means you'll literally step in a time machine back to 1997 every time you boot your computer :P ) and the amount of time it takes you to set Gentoo up to get these benefits, you could have just gotten a faster CPU and achieved the same effect with a "normal" distro.

One thing about Linux and "fastness." Linux is often perceived to be slow, and rightfully so. It's GTK's and X's fault. I don't know, but something about GTK is just a little sluggish. The same app written on Windows or with Qt on Linux is much snappier and just feels more responsive overall. It's not really a big deal, GTK is fast enough to do the job with most apps (which are paid for by programmer profanities by the bucketful) but if you get hung up on things like this then perhaps you should use KDE and K* apps instead. KDE is easier to program for, so you get more quality apps as well ;)

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Some distros like Arch or Gentoo are marginally slower from more frugal link dependencies and CPU-specific optimizations, but arch is Slackware-based (which means you'll literally step in a time machine back to 1997 every time you boot your computer :P ) and the amount of time it takes you to set Gentoo up to get these benefits, you could have just gotten a faster CPU and achieved the same effect with a "normal" distro.

You meant that 'Arch or Gentoo are marginally FASTER from more frugal link dependencies and CPU-specific optimizations...'

Am I correct?

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I took pharohs suggestion and did a minimal net debian install. When I said ubuntu was slow what I ment was it was bloated, and just had a bunch of stuff i didnot need. I am giving fluxbox and openbox a try for my window managers ATM but if they dont work out i will go to KDE. Thx for the help guys.

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Some distros like Arch or Gentoo are marginally slower from more frugal link dependencies and CPU-specific optimizations, but arch is Slackware-based (which means you'll literally step in a time machine back to 1997 every time you boot your computer :P ) and the amount of time it takes you to set Gentoo up to get these benefits, you could have just gotten a faster CPU and achieved the same effect with a "normal" distro.

You meant that 'Arch or Gentoo are marginally FASTER from more frugal link dependencies and CPU-specific optimizations...'

Am I correct?

Sorry, yes :P

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I took pharohs suggestion and did a minimal net debian install. When I said ubuntu was slow what I ment was it was bloated, and just had a bunch of stuff i didnot need. I am giving fluxbox and openbox a try for my window managers ATM but if they dont work out i will go to KDE. Thx for the help guys.

Having software installed that you're not using doesn't make the system perform any worse. I could install every single package from the debian archives (which are really huge) and beyond startup times from all the services (which can be easily disabled) it should run the same as a normal install.

I don't find much joy in lingering on subjects like these. If something is slow, I'll live with it. If something is too slow to live with, I'll find something faster. I look for functionality, features, etc when deciding on which software to use. Whether one piece of software is a little bit faster or smaller or prettier is just irrelevant (but certainly not unwelcome features).

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Having software installed that you're not using doesn't make the system perform any worse. I could install every single package from the debian archives (which are really huge) and beyond startup times from all the services (which can be easily disabled) it should run the same as a normal install.

I don't find much joy in lingering on subjects like these. If something is slow, I'll live with it. If something is too slow to live with, I'll find something faster. I look for functionality, features, etc when deciding on which software to use. Whether one piece of software is a little bit faster or smaller or prettier is just irrelevant (but certainly not unwelcome features).

yes but why have software I don't need? It is just wasting space. I am the kind of person who likes to start from the ground up not the otherway around. Anyway to each his own i guess.

Edited by rob1101
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I was under the impression we live in a world with obscenely large hard drives at shockingly low prices. I just don't see why you would need to worry about it. Just ignore the stuff you don't use. But I guess you're right: if you really want to, worry away.

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It's called package selection and deletion. Maybe you should try actually learning how to use your distro of choice and just disable the services you don't need and remove the packages you don't need/want. Yes, binary distros are going to usually require more dependencies, but you can slim down pretty much any distro you want. Aside from the fact that I think ubuntu is a piece of shit and I hate the community surrounding debian, linux is linux and anything you can do with one distro you can do with another. It's just a matter of how much time you want to put into it.

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I was under the impression we live in a world with obscenely large hard drives at shockingly low prices. I just don't see why you would need to worry about it. Just ignore the stuff you don't use. But I guess you're right: if you really want to, worry away.

May be, but there are plenty of people out there with old hardware. I run into space issues with embedded stuff frequently, but that's a more unique case.

If you don't like fluxbox/openbox, try XFCE. It's a lot lighter than KDE, considering KDE is about as heavy as you can get.

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If you know kde you can slim it down fairly well too. There are tons of packages you can leave out, you can disable some of the services it starts up, you can turn off virtually all the effects, and KDE 4 not only runs much faster and has a smaller memory footprint than KDE 3 but it's window manager is also 3d accelerated so you should notice less load on your machine as your gpu is doing most of the work.

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For speed I like the Zenwalk distro, based on Slackware, uses XFCE as GUI

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It's called package selection and deletion. Maybe you should try actually learning how to use your distro of choice and just disable the services you don't need and remove the packages you don't need/want. Yes, binary distros are going to usually require more dependencies, but you can slim down pretty much any distro you want. Aside from the fact that I think ubuntu is a piece of shit and I hate the community surrounding debian, linux is linux and anything you can do with one distro you can do with another. It's just a matter of how much time you want to put into it.

Personally I would rather start basic and install the programs and services i need/want instead of looking up every single service that runs disable it and then uninstall that package. It just seems to take less time to get the system I want IMO

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It's called package selection and deletion. Maybe you should try actually learning how to use your distro of choice and just disable the services you don't need and remove the packages you don't need/want. Yes, binary distros are going to usually require more dependencies, but you can slim down pretty much any distro you want. Aside from the fact that I think ubuntu is a piece of shit and I hate the community surrounding debian, linux is linux and anything you can do with one distro you can do with another. It's just a matter of how much time you want to put into it.

Personally I would rather start basic and install the programs and services i need/want instead of looking up every single service that runs disable it and then uninstall that package. It just seems to take less time to get the system I want IMO

Actually, I agree with livinded. For a while I was doing net installs of Debian and my systems were very very slim. I had desktop installations at ~450 mb. I was using window managers and the bear minimum for x display manager.

The problem is that without the extra dependencies you DO NOT get a fully functional system. For instance, lets say you removed support for all the video and audio formats that you don't currently listen to or have.... then you have to go grab the right package to listen to new formats later on.... Or how about if you go to use a feature on a tool or application that requires some very little known library you chose to remove? You are now stuck searching through the repositories for a library you have no idea existed and do not know the name to. Wasting more time is what I call it.

I suggest you install a full Desktop Environment and then remove what you don't use later. You can also remove stuff like locales and man pages from other languages. If you use debian lookup these tools:

localepurge (purges unwanted locales, ncurses interface)

deborphan (finds and identifies orphaned libraries, even better than aptitude does)

debfoster (goes through EVERY package on your system and lets you say Y or N to remove/purge from your system)

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