Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Lock0ut

Is Linux a potential backdoor?

13 posts in this topic

Hi again,

I was pondering something the other day. I'm hoping someone with some expertise can shed some light on this theory I had.

In theory lets say I own COMPUTER A is a Windows XP / Vista box. Now I changed the password and forgot that password to COMPUTER A, so that I no longer have access past the login screens. So what I want to do is recover data off this Windows box (photos, applications, documents) that I can't get into anymore.

NOW What I'm thinking about is this...

I have a flash drive that holds any bootable Linux distribution. I'll use BT3 as an example.

Now I'm booted to Backtrack 3 off my USB. While running this am I able to access that primary harddrive that has Windows stored to it so that I may be able to recovery my documents and whatever?

It has to be possible, but I'm still a little wet behind the ears and I was seeing what you guys think.

I know there are different ways of reacquiring you logins, but thats not what I'm really focused on.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Short answer: Yes.

I don't know if I'd call it a backdoor.. and you can do it with any operating system that's capable of mounting an NTFS partition.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YES.

Using OPHCrack and other tools on a liveCD or bootable USB stick, you could recover network passwords stored on said machine and gain access to that network.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YES.

Using OPHCrack and other tools on a liveCD or bootable USB stick, you could recover network passwords stored on said machine and gain access to that network.

I'm looking for the how to of the Linux part. I know about different tools that can do it, thats not what I'm looking into. I'm going to BT3 right now and trying it.

Edited by Lock0ut
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry guys, I was not aware that Orphcrack was actually a version of Linux. It is pretty impressive too.

I'm sure there is many more possibilities viewing a NTFS with Linux though... :devil:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you just want the files.

  1. Get A Ubuntu live-cd and a USB hard drive
  2. reboot the computer with the cd in
  3. plugin hard drive
  4. copy files using drag and drop
  5. remove drives and cd
  6. reboot
  7. Congratulations you have just hacked windows XP
  8. PROFIT!!!!

Sercurity on pcs are a joke, if your left alone in a room with them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm sure there is many more possibilities viewing a NTFS with Linux though...

Not really, you just mount them. Also, your kernel has to support NTFS read if you want to "view" an NTFS partition. (I know the Ubuntu one does)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving this to the Newbie forum

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm sure there is many more possibilities viewing a NTFS with Linux though...

Not really, you just mount them. Also, your kernel has to support NTFS read if you want to "view" an NTFS partition. (I know the Ubuntu one does)

Not necessarily... fuse-ntfs-3g is much better than the crappy implementation in the Linux kernel.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm sure there is many more possibilities viewing a NTFS with Linux though...

Not really, you just mount them. Also, your kernel has to support NTFS read if you want to "view" an NTFS partition. (I know the Ubuntu one does)

Not necessarily... fuse-ntfs-3g is much better than the crappy implementation in the Linux kernel.

Well what I was thinking along those lines is that you could also setup a program to autorun on startup through Linux. So when the box is booted any sort of application can be executed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A basic rule of thumb when it comes to network security, is that if there is physical access to a machine, it's compromised. If a malicious user (hacker) has physical access to a computer connected to the target network, they can boot a live linux distro (such as BackTrack) and basically do whatever they want. A backdoor is really more like some way to gain access to a computer or network remotely by exploiting a weakness in the target machine.

A terminology issue really... But you're right in the sense that physical security is the most important part of securing a network.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0