doomtroll

Poor Man's Hacker toolkit

32 posts in this topic

When I was growing up I had limited access to computers or the internet since I lived in a small rural town and we never had much money. I didn't get my very own computer till I was in college, but I knew allot about them before I ever owned one.

I know I'm not the only one who has had experiences similar to this in their life. So, considering what is available today, what would you consider essential tools for a hacker not lucky enough to have a computer of his own..

Off the top of my head, and since I carry them anyway.....

Sturdy Pocket Notebook ( I use a Moleskine)

Mulit-tool (Such as a Gerber or Leatherman)

USB Stick (1 GB sticks are cheap now)

What would you have in your kit if you didn't have a computer?

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An MP3 player instead of a flash drive, even if it is still just 1gb. People will be less suspicious if they see an MP3 player rather than a flash drive. I carry all of my important data on mine, and no one ever thinks about it.

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doomtroll: what would you consider essential tools for a hacker not lucky enough to have a computer of his own..

A lbm t42 latptop with Slackware linux and 2 gigs of ram.

I had to wait until I graduated High School it was worth it. Dell insperon E1705 Dual Core 2 gigs of ram 7900 nvedia graphics card and linux.

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When I was growing up I had limited access to computers or the internet since I lived in a small rural town and we never had much money. I didn't get my very own computer till I was in college, but I knew allot about them before I ever owned one.

I know I'm not the only one who has had experiences similar to this in their life. So, considering what is available today, what would you consider essential tools for a hacker not lucky enough to have a computer of his own..

Off the top of my head, and since I carry them anyway.....

Sturdy Pocket Notebook ( I use a Moleskine)

Mulit-tool (Such as a Gerber or Leatherman)

USB Stick (1 GB sticks are cheap now)

What would you have in your kit if you didn't have a computer?

Flashlight.

A couple USB sticks. One for haxing windows, and one bootable OS.

Edited by gloomer
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If you live in any country, and able to view this website, you should have a computer, I can go out on any day of the week and find a computer on the side of the road, may not be much but it's a computer.

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If you live in any country, and able to view this website, you should have a computer, I can go out on any day of the week and find a computer on the side of the road, may not be much but it's a computer.

Online access is available in many public libraries ...you only need a library card to use...and they are free...

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Knoppix live cd

External hard drive

PDA

Windows live cd with cracking tools

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If you live in any country, and able to view this website, you should have a computer, I can go out on any day of the week and find a computer on the side of the road, may not be much but it's a computer.

Online access is available in many public libraries ...you only need a library card to use...and they are free...

tell me something I don't know, but my statement still stands and is still true.

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If you live in any country, and able to view this website, you should have a computer, I can go out on any day of the week and find a computer on the side of the road, may not be much but it's a computer.

Online access is available in many public libraries ...you only need a library card to use...and they are free...

tell me something I don't know, but my statement still stands and is still true.

There will always be flaws in any blanket generalization.

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A USB stick is definitly the cheapest best friend you can buy. Install a compiler on it (mingw + codeblocks, that's what I do), and then use it on public computers to program. I do that all the time at school, it saves me from bringing my laptop everytime I want to program.

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Aghaster why dont u just get to know your It Technicians ive got loads of extra privelages at school. and ive got no impero which is the software we use to ban websites and programs, they can watch what youre doing. And im allowed most programs on my account. my list can be endless

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This is an interesting thread. Kit is certainly a good thing to discuss, and I find myself constantly changing and perfecting my own kit. I used to carry a more extensive kit, including a flashlight and USB drives, multi-tool, knife, various things, but I've found that subtlety is usually a better option. As of now, I usually keep with me at all times:

-pocket knife (a thin but very nice benchmade)

-notebook (moleskine)

-fountain pen (Pilot Prera or Waterman Phileas for EDC)

-lighter (zippos are good - altho the torch lighters for cigars are good too)

-some chewing gum

And in addition to this I obviously always keep with me a few quarters, my wallet, cell phone, keys, and watch. None of this stuff takes up much space. A lot of people have mentioned flash drives. These are nice, but I find it easier to keep the tools I need on websites that I have through shell on friends' servers. I can always download putty and ssh to my shell anywhere.

People also have mentioned flashlights. These are extremely useful, but can be quite bulky. I actually like the LED lights that you can put on keychains. I also found that you can get these keys that have a colored LED built into the base, so you can combine a key with a working LED light. Nice if you want to save space. I have a few of these in different colors.

Sometimes I'll carry a pack of cigarettes as well. I don't smoke habitually, but one can stand just about anywhere smoking a cigarette and look totally normal. They can also be good ice breakers.

Cheers,

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I would have an iPod. Seriously, you can boot linux on one of those things! :o Plus the 2GB storage is good if you didn't have a flash drive. I carry a Damn Small Linux biz card cd around because you can boot it on a 486 with 16 mb ram and no hard disk. :D Of course my flash drive. I use portableapps so I carry around all of my programs with me.

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I don't know, back when I was growing up it was not easy to find computers but for the last 10 years at least, it has been easy. You can find some P3 and a lot of P4 computers by simply walking around any business park and if you live in the ass end of no where you can use trains and buses to get to them. If you go out the day after Christmas you can find computers on the side of the road.

P2/P3/P4 computer running Debian with fluxbox.

A Fon (very cheap and runs OpenWRT)

Home made directional antenna (Biquad + dish)

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We've had a computer at home for some time, but we didn't always have Internet, and until I went to college and got a job to afford satellite Internet for home, it was always dialup. So I kept a pretty good mobile toolkit:

External storage (used to be USB card reader + CF)

Flashlight (mini-Mag)

Knife/Bladeless Multi-Tool (for school)

Zippo lighter

Pocket notebook + pencil

Paper clip or other bit of wire (infinitely useful)

Prepaid phone card

I also kept a shell account on the Grex server, which is run in Ann Arbor, MI. They allowed telnet, so I didn't need to try and run a SSH client on the machines at school -- I could either use the built-in telnet client on Windows machines, or one of many browser-based telnet clients intended for MUDs. The Grex server also allowed for actual dial-up modem access (not PPP/SLIP/etc, but actual serial link console modem), which I could dial through the calling card -- through the shell account, I had access to a *nix machine (it was running Sun OS 4.x for most of the time I had an account), including e-mail (most web-based e-mail was blocked at school).

Eventually, through CCNA class at the vo-tech, we set up a rack-mounted 450 MHz AMD K6-2, and enabled SSH/telnet/FTP, which gave me and my friends a (at the time) limitless file storage area. We could download stuff at school, either through wget or by downloading it locally and uploading via FTP, and put it on a regular desktop hard disk when in CCNA class. This got us past the relatively small limit of affordable flash memory of the time (I remember paying $50 for a 32 MB CF card), allowing us to download CD ISOs, etc, for use at home.

When I went off to military school, I changed things to be more covert -- instead of a regular USB flash-based storage system, I got an Edge DiskGo watch, which is a watch with 256 MB USB flash built in. I also got a 128 MB SmartMedia card, which I could hide between the wainscoting around the room and the wall. I eventually got a PQI Intelligent Disk, the (at the time) smallest USB flash drive available -- 1 GB in something so small, it didn't have a metal shell around its USB contacts. I hid it either under the keyboard, or under the battery, in my laptop. I also used my laptop to get by the $35 cash-in-possession rule we had -- I hid extra cash under the memory and hard disk slots on my laptop, enabling me to keep emergency funds at all times.

I also had a fairly neat and undetectable (to the low-intelligence "admins" there, anyway) way of storing data I thought too "dangerous" to have on my person -- using HiJetter, I could store files of any type on the flash memory intended for storing fonts on LaserJet printers. Thus, I had a file store (usually 16 or 32 MB, but there were several LaserJets on campus that this worked for) that no one at the school even knew about, or was capable of finding access logs for.

Edited by systems_glitch
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Aghaster why dont u just get to know your It Technicians ive got loads of extra privelages at school. and ive got no impero which is the software we use to ban websites and programs, they can watch what youre doing. And im allowed most programs on my account. my list can be endless

oh well, I don't remember mentionning I didn't have enough rights on my school's computers. In fact, they allow way too much. There is no antivirus, firewall, deepfreeze and that kind of stuff. People even install computer games, and they stay on the computers. The only thing I've found is a filter that allows certain protocols only. They probably do some monitoring, but it doesn't hurt much.

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I would like to ask you guys. . . What are your intentions when you come in contact with a computer?

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I would like to ask you guys. . . What are your intentions when you come in contact with a computer?

wargames.jpg

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I would like to ask you guys. . . What are your intentions when you come in contact with a computer?

USE IT!!!!!

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probably a fatass notebook full of valuable information, a usb stick full of booty and 0days, a beige box, lockpicking kit, magnetic card reader/writer

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then again, if you were a good enough (blackhat) hacker, it wouldn't be hard to obtain a laptop

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then again, if you were a good enough (blackhat) hacker, it wouldn't be hard to obtain a laptop

...and if you were a good enough white hat you could just buy one.

The only way I could see being without a computer for a long period of time would be an extended road trip where you were trying to be lightweight and cheap.. I would say the most imporant thing for a computerless hacker would be the address of the nearest library. Secondly a reliable shell account somewhere. Then ofcourse the USB stick full of whatever, After reading this thread too many times myself from 10 years ago called to say that I must be rich if I can carry around a whole gig of storage, and that one day I'll afford a jazz drive too :P

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Good thread, folks!

My US$0.02: When I was in high school I went through a couple years of, shall we say, dumb arrangements after my parents divorced. I ended up going from living in a nice house in town to moving 15 miles out of town, and living in a camper while building our new (and rather minimal/utilitarian-ish) house. We had power, but phone service wasn't really in the budget. Worse yet, I never got a chance to retrieve most of my gear, so lots of perfectly good stuff (some odd/rare) probably ended up in the landfill.

I spent days in town at school, and weekends at the house in town, so I had some time in the "connected world" to make arrangements for myself. Of course I used school computers, and I eventually tracked down a couple of my boxes, one of which I "colo-ed" with a buddy who had DSL. I'd telnet into the box from school during the week and wget oodles of stuff which I could pick up later or get through our little sneaker-net (buddy would put files on disk and bring it to school for me).

Having been an very active volunteer at the local community center (built their network and did maintainence for several years prior) paid off; now that I was back to zero, the stuff I chucked in their closets looked pretty good! It was there that I nabbed a PowerBook 3400 that became my daily-use machine. I could drag it with me anywhere I wished, using whatever connection I might happen upon. It was a great deal, all things considered. I even managed to dig up a Cisco 350 wireless card and a panel antenna (which I taped to the lid!) for 'borrowing' WiFi from longer distances.

For access at home, I eventually got myself a prepaid cell phone that I could make serial connections through. It was a pretty poor deal, but by that point I was happy just to have the means to grab a few more textfiles or cache a couple more pages on the long winter nights.

After a year or so I started getting slightly crazy. I climbed tall trees to survey possible wireless paths. I put a rogue access point at school (but only having taken severe precautions). I even went canning on warmer days, provided I had ample bug-spray. I wouldn't recommend any of these things, but then again I know I'm neither the first nor the last to try them.

So... a few of the things I learned:

- One man's junk is another man's treasure (especially when it comes to IT gear)

- If you live in a rural area, carry a butt-set... you never know when you might be stranded in an area without cell coverage

- Having friends in the right places can make all the difference

- Making friends in the right places should be done BEFORE you need something from them

- If you have no better option, pick a mark you don't care about and get SEing (don't burn bridges!)

- There are countless uses for metal coat-hangers

- When the going gets tough, back it down to V.32 and redial

- Always carry basic tools, install media for common OSes, and some live CDs. Besides the obvious, these things can be handy for making quick repairs, thus getting on the luser's good side and perhaps even making a few bucks.

- Having done enough research and practice, you can accomplish nearly anything

- If reduced to war-walking, stick to scanning during daylight hours (unless your gear is in a bag or backpack, or otherwise not illuminated)

- A bicycle - even an old one - can be invaluable. Always keep at least one handy.

- No matter who or where you are, you're always welcome at sdf.lonestar.org

Hope this helps...

Edited by nwbell
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...and if you were a good enough white hat you could just buy one.

Or, if you are like me, you can do what I did...

I traded some web design work for one. It was old, but worked. It's still sitting on my desk...below this one...

The work took about 30 minutes. The laptop was pretty much free. Most of the time was used getting the guy to explain where he wanted his picture on the page...

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