Wanna_Be_Big

Whats the most powerful and versatile programming language?

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I'm majoring in CS and we are learning Visual Basic .net. I want to learn a programming language that can be used for anything.

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"Powerful" and "versatile" are far too subjective.

Pretty much any programming language can be used to program anything.

Edited by Lugner
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Doesn't this subject come up every week or so? There is no "perfect", "best" or "most powerful" language.

  • Step 1: Pick a language. Any language really, just don't pick anything really obscure, half finished or ancient at first.
  • Step 2: Learn the language. Learn it well. Reading a 10 part tutorial and typing in the example code is not learning a language.
  • Step 3: Use the language. Continue doing this for some time.
  • Step 4: Analyze the language. Identify any faults you just can't live with. Move on to another language if you feel the need.

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I can tell you something, whatever the language is it isn't anything with the words "Visual" or ".NET" in it. Why are they teaching you that awful piece of shit?

Edited by stefanovich
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I recommend C or Ada. Maybe I'm old school, but I prefer procedural languages over OOP any day of the week.

Edited by signull
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I can tell you something, whatever the language is it isn't anything with the words "Visual" or ".NET" in it. Why are they teaching you that awful piece of shit?

That was my reaction when i found out that we were learning .net. Ima try C.

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Any Turing Complete language can do anything another language can do. The trick is in finding a language that makes it easy to do the type of stuff you like to do...

Big fan of scripting and data mining? Use perl!

Like system programming and networking? Use C!

Intrested in microprocessors? Use ASM!

etc, etc...

So I think the real question is what is the best language FOR YOU. Think about what you want to do with it then ask the question again :)

To be honest, once you've learned one language you can pick up others pretty fast. Learning C took me about 6 months, but then I learned C++ in one, perl in one, C# in a week, php in like a day, the list goes on and on.

-Dr^ZigMan

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I can tell you something, whatever the language is it isn't anything with the words "Visual" or ".NET" in it. Why are they teaching you that awful piece of shit?

What is your rational behind that?

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Any Turing Complete language can do anything another language can do. The trick is in finding a language that makes it easy to do the type of stuff you like to do...

Big fan of scripting and data mining? Use perl!

Like system programming and networking? Use C!

Intrested in microprocessors? Use ASM!

etc, etc...

So I think the real question is what is the best language FOR YOU. Think about what you want to do with it then ask the question again :)

To be honest, once you've learned one language you can pick up others pretty fast. Learning C took me about 6 months, but then I learned C++ in one, perl in one, C# in a week, php in like a day, the list goes on and on.

-Dr^ZigMan

Good point. I like to make applications like a mini bank database, make apps that interacts with my os like shut it off at a certain time, and make games.

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I want to learn a programming language that can be used for anything.

Hmmm... Well depends most/all programming languages can be used for "anything". I would say maybe C or C++. C++ is very powerful and its very open to all sorts of things. :)

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If you measure "power" by having the most paradigms possible, I'd say Oz is the most "powerful" language.

But anyway, there isn't really a "most powerful" or "best" language, but everyone has a favorite, you just have to learn about them then pick one that you like.

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I can tell you something, whatever the language is it isn't anything with the words "Visual" or ".NET" in it. Why are they teaching you that awful piece of shit?

What is your rational behind that?

Just a general, irrational hatred for anything Microsoft:P

Well, any of the visual stuff seems to abstract you away from what's actually going on too much. The .NET framework sucks. I had the displeasure of sitting through one or two classes of that for a project. Syntax is way too heavy and verbose.

Ended up teaching myself Ruby on Rails and using that instead. Ruby :) Rails :| but still a lot better than .NET.

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I can tell you something, whatever the language is it isn't anything with the words "Visual" or ".NET" in it. Why are they teaching you that awful piece of shit?

What is your rational behind that?

Just a general, irrational hatred for anything Microsoft:P

There ya go.

Well, any of the visual stuff seems to abstract you away from what's actually going on too much. The .NET framework sucks. I had the displeasure of sitting through one or two classes of that for a project. Syntax is way too heavy and verbose.

Ended up teaching myself Ruby on Rails and using that instead. Ruby :) Rails :| but still a lot better than .NET.

Any language, even Assembly, provides abstractions -- that's not a bad thing. Ruby, for example, has practically all the same abstractions that C# or VB.NET does: Types, functions, objects, exceptions, automated memory management, and so on.

As for .NET framework sucking, more general, irrational hatred for anything Microsoft, right?

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I don't really mind the abstraction of .NET. I think programmers have better things to do than spend the day coding buttons. However, I really hate the form and syntax of the code in .NET, and the idea that Microsoft is trying to monopilize programming languages. Plus there are so many other alternatives that are much more lightweight, and that you can integrate directly into your program, rather than making the user download some monsturous framework. Plus it's nowhere NEAR as portable as java, which makes the whole thing seem absolutely pointless. Also... I REALLY hate that some people are learning C# rather than C++ for game programming. You M$ drones actually think that games like Gears of War could have been created with C#?! Dumbasses....

Okay, I think I've said enough.

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I don't really mind the abstraction of .NET. I think programmers have better things to do than spend the day coding buttons. However, I really hate the form and syntax of the code in .NET, and the idea that Microsoft is trying to monopilize programming languages. Plus there are so many other alternatives that are much more lightweight, and that you can integrate directly into your program, rather than making the user download some monsturous framework. Plus it's nowhere NEAR as portable as java, which makes the whole thing seem absolutely pointless. Also... I REALLY hate that some people are learning C# rather than C++ for game programming. You M$ drones actually think that games like Gears of War could have been created with C#?! Dumbasses....

Okay, I think I've said enough.

.NET doesn't have form or syntax: It's just a collection of standards. If you meant the syntax and form of programming languages designed for .NET, like C#, most are near-clones of other programming languages, like Java.

Learning C# for game programming isn't a bad choice. Most programming in most games is now being done in high-level languages. Battlefield 2 has a lot of code written in Python. Unreal has it's own scripting language. Yes, the engine itself is written in C++, but that is a component that is simply reused, not rewritten. And really, learning "game programming" is about learning concepts, not a programming language.

Now, I'm really not trying to defend Microsoft or .NET. I've done some work in C# and have a long list of complaints (it's clearly a programming language written by Ph.D's, not programmers). And I have a ton of complaints about the libraries provided (18 different ways to screw in a light bulb, and none of them seem to work exactly right). But if I see what I think is baseless criticism of Microsoft or .NET, I'm going to call it out.

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I'm majoring in CS and we are learning Visual Basic .net. I want to learn a programming language that can be used for anything.

I'm going to say that if you want to stray away from VB, play around with Python. I think it helps develop good practices and a great language to build upon.

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after doing some reserch and just basically looking around, i decided to first learn C first.

hopefully, i can make a hacker out of me yet!

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Whats high level and low level programming? Is high level programming like english language that people can understand and low level language is like mahcine language (e.g assembly)?

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.NET is wonderful. It's driving a lot of the industry right now. If .NET sucked, no one would use it. If you want something that'll let you do anything you want (or if you want to know what's going on behind the scenes), C would be a good choice. If you want to be marketable, .NET is the way to go.

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I'm majoring in CS and we are learning Visual Basic .net. I want to learn a programming language that can be used for anything.

Erm... they all can. Pretty much.

Maybe what you're really asking is: which programming language makes it the easiest for the programmer to do anything. I.e. which is the easiest for the programmer to express their instructions. That depends entirely on the programmer and is not something you can measure a language by when the programmer can vary in experience and knowledge and more importantly, what it is they want to achieve with their tool (the programming language).

I personally find these discussions about languages as ridiculous as two carpenters arguing about 'which tools is better, the hammer or the spanner' - it all depends entirely on what you are using it for.

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