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jelliott7593

Programming Languages

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This is probably a typical newbie question, but I am getting into Computer Security and I wanted to learn a programming language. I am not sure which one I should learn. I attempted to start learning C++ awhile back, but overall that didn't work out all that good. IDK really any help?

Thanks so much =]

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Yes start by learning ASM, it's so logical, once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about. Most coder's do not even give it a try, just start on something easy eg: a ASM OS, then work your way up.

I found C/C++ very hard, i hope to try again once i have fully understand the much easier language of ASM.

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lisp or python. Lisp is just plainly beautiful and python is beginner friendly. Also both languages are powerful and with those languages at hand you can easily find open source projects to contribute.

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If I could do it over again, I'd start with a recursive functional language. I'd suggest Erlang as it fills both of those requirements and has built-in concurrency, which will come in handy in the future.

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once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about.

Just about every programming language is like that...

Go with either C or Ruby.

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C++ is awesome, because it gives you the ability to choose between high level libraries and APIs, or low level stuff, or a mix. Plus it is extremely well-documented, there are millions of tutorials / books, and it can be used to accomplish *anything*. The syntax is a little harder than other language, but if you pick a good book / online tutorial, it will be relatively easy to learn. I suggest the excellent tutorial on Cplusplus.com.

If you're into web programming, there's PHP, Ruby on Rails, Perl, Java, and M$'s shit. I like PHP, but I hear that Ruby on Rails is an excellent language as well. Just be sure that you know HTML beforehand.

ASM is a terrible beginner language, because its syntax nothing like any high-level language. Plus you'll spend a long time before you create anything useful; most likely you'll get frustrated and give up. But it is useful for software cracking / exploits once you are more experienced.

Edited by Spyril
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Yes start by learning ASM, it's so logical, once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about. Most coder's do not even give it a try, just start on something easy eg: a ASM OS, then work your way up.

I found C/C++ very hard, i hope to try again once i have fully understand the much easier language of ASM.

I don't understand how you can find C/C++ hard if you find ASM so easy. For me, it's the opposite. I was reading a book on ASM, and I was so overwhelmed that I decided to put off learning it for a while. High level languages are a piece of cake for me. Maybe I'm not cut out for ASM. I doubt I would ever use it often anyway.

Edited by signull
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Yes start by learning ASM, it's so logical, once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about. Most coder's do not even give it a try, just start on something easy eg: a ASM OS, then work your way up.

I found C/C++ very hard, i hope to try again once i have fully understand the much easier language of ASM.

I don't understand how you can find C/C++ hard if you find ASM so easy. For me, it's the opposite. I was reading a book on ASM, and I was so overwhelmed that I decided to put off learning it for a while. High level languages are a piece of cake for me. Maybe I'm not cut out for ASM. I doubt I would ever use it often anyway.

I think its a case of what suit your way of thinking, I started learning pascal, at first i followed the tuts, but as time when on i could write more and more code, without any reference, the same happened with ASM, but with C i was all the time having to use references to know know what to do.

This was abut 5 years ago, i have since started to learn C and found it much easier.

ASM is a terrible beginner language, because its syntax nothing like any high-level language. Plus you'll spend a long time before you create anything useful; most likely you'll get frustrated and give up. But it is useful for software cracking / exploits once you are more experienced.

If you go here:

http://www.madwizard.org/view.php?page=tutorials.contents

There are example of programming winsockets in both c++ and ASM, if you see the code its 85% the same, as asm in windows is more like a higher level language.

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Yes start by learning ASM, it's so logical, once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about. Most coder's do not even give it a try, just start on something easy eg: a ASM OS, then work your way up.

I found C/C++ very hard, i hope to try again once i have fully understand the much easier language of ASM.

I don't understand how you can find C/C++ hard if you find ASM so easy. For me, it's the opposite. I was reading a book on ASM, and I was so overwhelmed that I decided to put off learning it for a while. High level languages are a piece of cake for me. Maybe I'm not cut out for ASM. I doubt I would ever use it often anyway.

I second that...

I started out with C/C++ (also used the tutorial on CPlusPlus.com) and it has done it's job so far. Just like Spyril said, it's a pretty "flexible" language, you can incoporate everything from the ultimate low level of ASM up to high level libraries and APIs.

I am trying to learn x86 ASM right now and I gotta say it's a pain in the ass! Unless you really got the will to go through with it to a certain point, you'll get frustrated pretty soon... After you've reached that point I believe it's going to be rather easy and you'll actually be able to produce something useful ;)

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once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about.

Just about every programming language is like that...

Go with either C or Ruby.

I decided to start learning C, because its cross-platform and its seems pretty stable. And I learning off of http://www.cprogramming.com/. Does anyone know of a good C Compiler at all?

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Does anyone know of a good C Compiler at all?

UNIX-Like: GCC

Windows: Dev-C++ (The name suggests that it is C++, but it does C aswell)

Edited by n3xg3n
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once your over the first 3 months, you will find it so easy, that you will wounder what all the fuss was about.

Just about every programming language is like that...

Go with either C or Ruby.

I decided to start learning C, because its cross-platform and its seems pretty stable. And I learning off of http://www.cprogramming.com/. Does anyone know of a good C Compiler at all?

I personally don't like those tutorials on that site. I recommend getting this book:

http://cm.bell-labs.com/cm/cs/cbook/

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Does anyone know of a good C Compiler at all?

UNIX-Like: GCC

Windows: Dev-C++ (The name suggests that it is C++, but it does C aswell)

Protip: Dev-C++ actually uses gcc

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Not to steal the thread but how useful and powerful is Visual Basic .net?

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Not to steal the thread but how useful and powerful is Visual Basic .net?

VisualBasic, in my opinion, is okay. It's not too powerful, which is a good property to have.

But in reply to Phasma's topic, if he really wanted to, he could ask me for the C++ book sitting in my room. I'll send it express. ;)

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Not to steal the thread but how useful and powerful is Visual Basic .net?

VisualBasic, in my opinion, is okay. It's not too powerful, which is a good property to have.

But in reply to Phasma's topic, if he really wanted to, he could ask me for the C++ book sitting in my room. I'll send it express. ;)

Or I could just come over and get it.

:P

&& I decided on a language =] muahaha

EDIT: I am gonna start with C =]

Edited by phasma
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Would you be so kind to let us know which language you picked? :D

//: Could I be so smart to read your sig... <_<

Edited by thenotwist
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I really don't know why people use visual basic, or anything .NET. If you want a multi platform framework use Java for christ's sake. Unless you like to sell your soul to Microsoft. :ranaway:

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I recomend C because it's a nice middle ground between higher level programs and assembly. When I first got into programing (3-4 years ago) my father handed me a book older than I am on C meant for a command line OS...

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stick with c++...

multi OS, easy to learn once you get going with it, and lots of tutorials on it.

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