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new ubuntu

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anyone know if the new ubuntu is worth getting?

im currently on XP pro but considered LINUX but a new ubuntu is out today via download or a free cd

anyone downloaded it or got any info on the changes(if any)

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I really like Ubuntu. Some of the new features are discussed here:

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/releasenotes/710tour

I'm kind of waiting on VMWare Server packages for Gutsy to be added to http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu/dists/ before I move up from feisty, since I like being able to pull new versions of it with apt.

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I am downloading the DVD version now but since not many are seeding it, it will take a while. I will let you know what I think when I get it installed.

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Ubuntu is actually really good for the new linux user, or rather it definitely makes the transition from windows to linux a-lot easier. It installs all the hardware for you pretty much.

Edited by isolationX
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I am downloading the DVD version now but since not many are seeding it, it will take a while. I will let you know what I think when I get it installed.

where are you getting it from?

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Ubuntu is actually really good for the new linux user, or rather it definitely makes the transition from windows to linux a-lot easier. It installs all the hardware for you pretty much.

I'd go so far as to say it's good, even if you're not a new user. Gnome is configured very nicely out-of-the-box, and a suprising amount of the security and pentesting tools I like are in the repositories, ready to be installed, which saves me loads of time. When I need to tinker with things at a very low level, I'll use more lightweight distros in a virtual machine, but for most times when I just want things to work so I can get things done: Ubuntu all the way.

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Ubuntu is actually really good for the new linux user, or rather it definitely makes the transition from windows to linux a-lot easier. It installs all the hardware for you pretty much.

so what you's are saying that for my move to Linux from windows this is the way to do it?

install ubuntu use and familarise my self with it then change to Linux if necessary?

sounds good,

thanks for the information just reading up on it now

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so what you's are saying that for my move to Linux from windows this is the way to do it?

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution. There are other distributions of Linux which basically have different tools and configurations around the Linux kernel.

This just happens to be the Ubuntu distribution fanboy's thread :)

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Of course, if you're really thinking of doing away with microsoft completely I wouldn't recommend dual booting. Chances are you'll be like me and go back to windows over time for some random program or feature that you can't seem to work out on linux.

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Of course, if you're really thinking of doing away with microsoft completely I wouldn't recommend dual booting. Chances are you'll be like me and go back to windows over time for some random program or feature that you can't seem to work out on linux.

thats the thing,we have a pc in kitchen,my games pc and im building a new games pc next week so thinking of putting new OS on old games pc

seems worth it so far,

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I've developed a liking for it, although in the past I've not favored it for a number of reasons. The last release and the new one have both been quite good and very stable and make a fine desktop/laptop OS (stay away from it when it comes to servers). As long as you get the "build-essential" package it's a great easy to use, quick to setup OS that can be customized as much or as little as you want.

There is nearly nothing you can't do with Ubuntu that you can do with another distribution, It really comes down to personal taste. I still prefer Gentoo as I like everything working the way I want straight away, but as a consumer OS Ubuntu is very good.

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I've developed a liking for it, although in the past I've not favored it for a number of reasons. The last release and the new one have both been quite good and very stable and make a fine desktop/laptop OS (stay away from it when it comes to servers). As long as you get the "build-essential" package it's a great easy to use, quick to setup OS that can be customized as much or as little as you want.

There is nearly nothing you can't do with Ubuntu that you can do with another distribution, It really comes down to personal taste. I still prefer Gentoo as I like everything working the way I want straight away, but as a consumer OS Ubuntu is very good.

thanks,the more posts left the more i want it,i will have to download it as ordering a cd is a 10 week waiting list lol

must be good

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I have an old AMD 800 mhz box running Ubuntu. Hooked up via a KVM switch so I can switch back and forth systems as I please.. The more I use the Ubuntu box the more and more I like it. plus the KVM switch lets me switch to the windows box, google what I'm trying to figure out.. Switch back to the Ubuntu box and there is the screen waiting for me, cursor flashing. It's working well for me.

Just thought I'd throw that out there.. Really handy when you've just messed up your network settings and are trying to figure out what the hell to do to fix it. ;)

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Ive been using Ubuntu as my primary operating system on more then one computer for over a year now. its definitely the easiest to setup Linux distro I've ever used. ATI drivers still suck but thats not Ubuntu's fault. I recommend it to everyone, mostly because http://ubuntuforums.org/ is quite possibly the best source of knowledge for any operating system.

All that aside Im formating my laptop and going back to debian as soon as i have time to make sure i backed everything up. Not that its much different, but a year is too long without switching things up a bit.

oh and if you're still not sure what to do, just burn the disc and boot off of it, it will load a desktop with apps so you can try things out and see if you like it without doing anything permanent .

and one more thing its GNU/Linux I'll leave the full political rant out, but you should learn about Free software, Free as in Freedom http://www.gnu.org/

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I've been running Gutsy Beta for over a month now. I'm really impressed. There's still a few bugs (my laptop isn't _fully_ supported), but I don't really use the features that cause the bugs. It's the distribution I would recommend to my grandma.

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I'm reporting back in here since I decided to go ahead and install Gutsy on my laptop. If I need VMWare Server before the package for it shows up, I'll just install it manually.

The installation went smoothly. The repository servers are kind of straining under the load of everyone doing this at once, so if you see your installation stall at 82% with a message to the effect of "Checking Mirrors", don't worry. It eventually picked up or timed out and went on. Once it was installed, there were no package updates for the base system, so I went down my list and apt-get'd everything in that I normally use. It took longer than normal, of course, but it went faster than I thought it would.

Compiz is enabled by default, if your card supports it, and it's configured very modestly. The features that are enabled are the ones that are nice, user-interface-wise, without being over the top (like wobble). It's easy to turn off, if you don't like it. It performs very well on my Latitude C400, which has an i810 video chipset.

If I run into any gotchas, I'll post back again.

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I'm reporting back in here since I decided to go ahead and install Gutsy on my laptop. If I need VMWare Server before the package for it shows up, I'll just install it manually.

The installation went smoothly. The repository servers are kind of straining under the load of everyone doing this at once, so if you see your installation stall at 82% with a message to the effect of "Checking Mirrors", don't worry. It eventually picked up or timed out and went on. Once it was installed, there were no package updates for the base system, so I went down my list and apt-get'd everything in that I normally use. It took longer than normal, of course, but it went faster than I thought it would.

Compiz is enabled by default, if your card supports it, and it's configured very modestly. The features that are enabled are the ones that are nice, user-interface-wise, without being over the top (like wobble). It's easy to turn off, if you don't like it. It performs very well on my Latitude C400, which has an i810 video chipset.

If I run into any gotchas, I'll post back again.

cheers mate

also does ubuntu support finger print LOG ON?

as i have just baught one for my windows comp

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