xantr3x

Studying for the Microsoft 70-271 and 70-272

22 posts in this topic

I recently talked to a network admin I know who teaches at the local community college, and after explaining my situation of wanting to take my experience level to the next step, he recommended getting certified. I looked around, and decided on becoming an MCDST (Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician). Does anyone have any experience with this/advice?

Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do you want to be a Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician again?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends what you want to do. I've never heard of this certification, but I know in general most of the Microsoft ones (MCSE) are hella expensive and mostly just learning a bunch of random bullshit. When applying for a real job I don't know how much they are looked at as far as working in a company vs. working at say a chain computer repair store, where they basically wont hire you unless you have A+ even if you know more than the people with it, if may nor may not be easier to get the job but from what I've heard and seen experience is usually ranked higher. I don't currently or ever plan on getting any certifications, but they are mostly just to say that you were able to pass a test at one point that proves you sort of know what you are talking about.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My suggestion on this is that you do not get this certification unless you plan to be in desktop support for quite some time. However, a cert is a cert and any certification will help to take your resume to the top of the stack... Once there, it is up to you to get the job based off of your own knowledge. If you want to get into Microsoft server administration, I would recommend going for the MCSA or MCSE, but it depends on your future plans.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know how you feel. I also wanted to get my MCSE or something towards that. My current employeer wanted me to get this cert. I also would be interested in this. I guess more corp need some kine of paper work or cert to back up your skills or even get more money.

I knew I should of stuck with it a couple yrs back.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 70-271 and 70-272 are rather useless exams..

Demo question:

What function key do you hit during setup to start the ASR:

a. F5

b. F6

c. F7

d. F2

e. F10

Answer: D, F2*

Note: with beta2 apparently you have to hit f5 when prompted for ASR

Considering that: one - it tells you what key to hit when you go to do it and two - there is more than one right answer, doesn't that seem like a fun-filled cert exam? Especially when Microsofts own documentation got the answer wrong originally. :P

Avoid 70-271/272 and get the 70-270 (xp admin cert that all the mcse/mcsa use as the client OS pre-req).

On its own it makes you a mcp, 3 more certs and you are looking at a mcsa.. more than enough to 'break in to the industry'.

Edited by jabzor
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be honest, I would suggest the MCSE, as not only does it supply you with better cert recognition but more employers are somewhat dull when it comes to anything outside the mainstream certification acronyms such as CCNA CSE MCSE, A+, Linux+ etc.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The MCSA leads nicely in to the MCSE if you aren't quite ready to take the full plunge.

MCSA: 70-270, 70-290, 70-291 and an elective (I suggest either 70-299, 70-350 or preferably Security+ unless you want messaging then do 70-284).

MCSE: With the right elective you should only need the 2 mcse network (70-293, 70-294) and a design (70-297 or I suggest 70-298).

MCSE +s / +m: With a mcse and the matching elective you simply need 1 security or 1 messaging on top of it all.

mcse server 2003: 4 network, 1 client, 1 design, 1 elective

mcse security on server 2003: 4 network, 1 client, 1 design, 2 security

mcse messaging on server 2003: 4 network, 1 client, 1 design, 2 messaging

mcsa server 2003: 2 network, 1 client, 1 elective

mcsa security on server 2003: 2 network, 1 client, 2 security

mcsa messaging on server 2003: 2 network, 1 client, 1 messaging

Note- Server 2008 is just around the corner and Server NT/2000 certs are all but useless in todays market.

Edited by jabzor
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, looks like I'll be saving for quite a while, its looking like $400+ for the exams and to buy a few books, but the MCSA looks like a good start. Keep in mind, I'm 14, so I don't need anything too big just yet, that's why I chose the MCDST, but I should probably go for something that'll be good in the future. Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ever considered Cisco?

CCNA / NP With MCSE and Linux+ look perdy on a resume.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ever considered Cisco?

No, it seems like I'd prefer something that doesn't depend on all Cisco products.(That was my impression of the site, feel free to correct me.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And MS Certs don't require all Microsoft Products?

I've got the MCSE/MCDBA, CCNA, OCA, and HP-UX certifications personally. And from my early experience, I can tell you that diversification of your certifications is very good for you in the long run. It may cost a bit of money (most exams are $125 a piece), but having those certifications, though they will not guarantee you a job, will definitely give you an edge over other applicants. If you grab the MS certs, I'd recommend pulling down a Cisco one to back it up (even if you stop at CCNA). Most office environments that spend all that money of MS Active Directory networks, will definitely spend a few grand on Cisco hardware to connect it all. And if you got in as a Network Admin (or even a tech), chances are you will be expected to know a bit about that hardware as well.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, its looking like I'll go for my MCSA, upgrade to MCSE after, and then go for CCNA. Thanks!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To be honest, I would suggest the MCSE, as not only does it supply you with better cert recognition but more employers are somewhat dull when it comes to anything outside the mainstream certification acronyms such as CCNA CSE MCSE, A+, Linux+ etc.

Well see that's what I need also the MCSE... I'm also looking to get mine soon hopefully.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you take these exams once and they last for ever, or do you have to keep retaking them every few years?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you take these exams once and they last for ever, or do you have to keep retaking them every few years?

Cisco certs have to be renewed but Microsoft certs don't (nothing is going to change once you have the MCSE for 2003).

If you want to stay current though you will need to update MCSE 2003 to 2008 MCSE equivalent (as MCSE is being discontinued), just as the NT/2K certs upgraded to 2003.

Edit- here, some links:

Available Microsoft Certifications

Exams Scheduled for Discontinuation

Transitioning Your MCSE Skills to Windows Server 2008

Edited by jabzor
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you take these exams once and they last for ever, or do you have to keep retaking them every few years?

Cisco certs have to be renewed but Microsoft certs don't (nothing is going to change once you have the MCSE for 2003).

If you want to stay current though you will need to update MCSE 2003 to MCSE 2008, just as the NT/2K certs upgraded to 2003.

Well that's true... I just want to get the cert for a stepping stone. After that I'm thinking about going into security. then move on to CISSP... thats my goal plus also be a nice white hate down the road... I should get that when i'm about 97 yrs old... hahahah

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Employers are looking for people with Java and .NET certifications. If you're looking to use certifications as a means of improving your portfolio, you might want to get both Java and .NET certified. Building client-side applications is a thing of the past (although necessary in many cases). Everything is moving to the web. Getting .NET and Java certified will put a toe-nail in the door. There's nothing like in-the-field experience that will boost your portfolio more.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Employers are looking for people with Java and .NET certifications. If you're looking to use certifications as a means of improving your portfolio, you might want to get both Java and .NET certified. Building client-side applications is a thing of the past (although necessary in many cases). Everything is moving to the web. Getting .NET and Java certified will put a toe-nail in the door. There's nothing like in-the-field experience that will boost your portfolio more.

Well it's true what you're saying but if someone wants to get into security or networking then this would be a good cert... Good example is myself, I'm working on getting into security, or sysadmin, networking... To me I would think this would be a good cert...

What do you guys think?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my personal recommendation is to get the "basic" certs out of the way. if you go and start applying for your first IT job and you show more "serious" certs then it looks kind of fishy. mainly because lots of people do this and thus you get a paper MCSE.

just my .02

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm currently working towards MCDST, I'm in my fourth week of the course currently. The MCDST stuff is mixed in with it and CISCO is also on the course next year with my college.

I've also been given this stuff to learn online.

67hm9s7.jpg

I'd say it was worth it, job-wise... as much as you may hate Microsoft the qualification opens some doors.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now