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Remix

/ parition 90% full

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I have no posted in a while for I have been busy with school, but If anybody could help me It would be greatly appreciated.

I am running Ubuntu Feisty for some time now although I am still not entirely proficient in linux. I went to boot one day and I got a boot error saying that my install was corrupt or drives were full and proceed to boot in a fail safe session to try and fix the problem. I did such into the terminal. by running <df -l> it noted that my / partition was 100% full. so i ran sudo apt-get clean (i think thats the command i used, if not one like it). Anyways it cleared 10% of space and I was able to boot back into the GUI.

From here: <df -l>

Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on

/dev/sdb1 2885780 2445624 293568 90% /

varrun 387836 212 387624 1% /var/run

varlock 387836 0 387836 0% /var/lock

procbususb 387836 92 387744 1% /proc/bus/usb

udev 387836 92 387744 1% /dev

devshm 387836 0 387836 0% /dev/shm

lrm 387836 33788 354048 9% /lib/modules/2.6.20-16-g

so i do cd /

then i ran <sudo du -hc --max-depth=1> and get:

9.2M ./etc

108K ./dev

4.0K ./mnt

33M ./boot

6.1M ./sbin

32G ./home

16K ./lost+found

253M ./lib

0 ./proc

4.0K ./opt

5.5M ./root

4.0K ./initrd

4.8M ./bin

4.0K ./srv

1.9G ./usr

0 ./sys

64K ./tmp

181M ./var

12K ./media

34G .

34G total

If you notice, the home directory would be the only potential candidate for the reason that my hd is showing full but, i have a 200gb hard drive, due to the total at the bottom clearly we are not at 90%

I cant figure out what on the root partition is taking up all this space. Hopefully I gave enough description. Thanks everyone.

edit:/dev/sdb1 2885780 2445624 293568 90% / - I know this is what i should be looking at but...im stumped :(

Edited by Remix
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Give us an fdisk -l and a df -h. And for god's sake, sudo passwd root.

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ok....

you prob have more then one partition ..

/

/usr

SWAP

something like that

what happens 90% of the time is that /var/ or /tmp get full but you still need to understand how to read..

df -h

Edited by operat0r
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okay,

fdisk -l shows:

Disk /dev/sdb: 203.9 GB, 203928109056 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 24792 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sdb1 1 365 2931831 83 Linux

/dev/sdb3 366 24670 195229912+ 83 Linux

/dev/sdb2 24671 24792 979965 82 Linux swap / Solaris

df -h

Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on

/dev/sdb1 2.8G 2.4G 287M 90% /

varrun 379M 220K 379M 1% /var/run

varlock 379M 0 79M 0% /var/lock

procbususb 379M 92K 379M 1% /proc/bus/usb

udev 379M 92K 379M 1% /dev

devshm 379M 0 379M 0% /dev/shm

lrm 379M 33M 346M 9% /lib/modules/2.6.20-16-generic/volat

/dev/sdb3 184G 32G 143G 18% /home

jesus idk why i used df -l, sorry.

my 3 partitions are /home, SWAP. and /

when i look into the /tmp folder it shows '34 items, totalling 28.3 KB'

Edited by Remix
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okay,

fdisk -l shows:

Disk /dev/sdb: 203.9 GB, 203928109056 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 24792 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sdb1 1 365 2931831 83 Linux

/dev/sdb3 366 24670 195229912+ 83 Linux

/dev/sdb2 24671 24792 979965 82 Linux swap / Solaris

df -h

Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on

/dev/sdb1 2.8G 2.4G 287M 90% /

varrun 379M 220K 379M 1% /var/run

varlock 379M 0 79M 0% /var/lock

procbususb 379M 92K 379M 1% /proc/bus/usb

udev 379M 92K 379M 1% /dev

devshm 379M 0 379M 0% /dev/shm

lrm 379M 33M 346M 9% /lib/modules/2.6.20-16-generic/volat

/dev/sdb3 184G 32G 143G 18% /home

jesus idk why i used df -l, sorry.

my 3 partitions are /home, SWAP. and /

when i look into the /tmp folder it shows '34 items, totalling 28.3 KB'

/ is using 90% of 2.8G which means 2.4G is in use and you have 287M remaining. However your /home directory where the majority of your hard drive space is has a capacity of 184G and your only currently using up 32G. Your system however is attempting to use or allocate additional space to a directory or file off of / however not within the /home dir. Going with that theme your list shows 1.9G ./usr which instantly leaves .9G of / to play with. 900M is not very much to play with.

Edited by Zapperlink
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2.8 gigs is a bit small for your root partition. I usually go for somewhere around 10 gigs just to be safe, hard drive space is cheap enough to waste. You can fix this with gparted. Download the gparted live CD, it should really help. Resize your /home partition and/or move it so your / partition has some space to grow, then grow your / partition. Back your data up first, who knows what can go wrong with something like that?

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Okay I will look into gparted then thanks everyone for the help.

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Hi,

The '/var' tree is also taking up quite a bit of space, you'll probably find that there are all the downloaded '.deb's sitting in '/var/cache/apt/archives'. The '.deb's can be safely deleted (they are already installed on the system and the are only useful if you want to re-install them).

Cheers,

Munge.

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And for god's sake, sudo passwd root.

And at least read https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo to understand why the root account and sudo are set up like they are in Ubuntu, before you do the above. Personally, I think it's a good way of doing things from the standpoints of both usability and security.

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ubuntu comes with Baobab i think, it's a program that shows a graphical view of the directories selected. maybe you need to run it with sudo to access everything, but once it's done the scan right-click on the root directory and select 'folder graphical map'

there's also a program called fslint that will clean out loads of stuff

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BTW there's a really great partitioning distro called Parted Magic, it's only about 30MB and uses xfce and has some great programs B)

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BTW there's a really great partitioning distro called Parted Magic, it's only about 30MB and uses xfce and has some great programs B)

QT Parted is probably the generic open source choice and a program that I have used countless times to resize partitions without fail.

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BTW there's a really great partitioning distro called Parted Magic, it's only about 30MB and uses xfce and has some great programs B)

QT Parted is probably the generic open source choice and a program that I have used countless times to resize partitions without fail.

i'm not sure what you're trying to say? either you prefer a qt frontend, or yes you think it's a good distro because it uses the same backend, or you don't like it because the extra tools it has like testdisk, fdisk, sfdisk, dd, ddrescue, Leafpad, thunar, Terminal, rsync etc aren't worth the extra few MBs ???

anyway it looks like in the last few days he's decided to make this release the last one because he can't find a C programmer to work on GParted.

ok so how is GParted and QT Parted different? do they use different libs?

Edited by iceni
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ok so how is GParted and QT Parted different? do they use different libs?

According to packages.ubuntu.com Gparted and QTparted both depend on libparted, so I guess it's just gui differences.

Mungewell.

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Gparted might use a slightly older version of the lib, but i'm not sure. anyway, i love Parted Magic for my computers, it uses most of the things i already use.

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