austinator

programming

23 posts in this topic

I was thinking of getting into programing and i was wondering what would be a good starting language.
I know html pretty well and javascript ok
but i want to program
so maby python,C++ idk
any suggestions?

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Certainly not C++. Python is a good choice, go with that. It doesn't really matter what you learn when you start, as long as it's something easy to use. When learning programming, it's the concepts and techniques that you have to learn, syntax and other language specifics aren't so important. Everything you learned with Python will count when (and if) you ever decide to move to a new language.

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I agree -- python's a good language to start with. Also consider ruby and ocaml... Since you do a lot of web stuff already, might also consider perl as a possibility (if in part because there are some really good learning resources out there -- for eg the oreilly starting perl book). Edited by Abhayaa

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python is great. once i learned it it was easier to understand alot of programming fundimentals.

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[quote name='Ohm' post='271637' date='Jul 28 2007, 02:42 AM']Certainly not C++. Python is a good choice, go with that. It doesn't really matter what you learn when you start, as long as it's something easy to use. When learning programming, it's the concepts and techniques that you have to learn, syntax and other language specifics aren't so important. Everything you learned with Python will count when (and if) you ever decide to move to a new language.[/quote]
C++ was the first programming language I learned and it seemed easy for me.

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i started learning Basic, because it's well, basic. Heres the link to [url="http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/downloads/"]Microsoft Visual Studio[/url]

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Another vote for python. That is waht I am currently working with and it seems to flow well. And from some of the stuff I have seen, it is extremly flexible and it's usage is quite diverse.

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I started with C++ and then moved to C. I now stick with C.

If you want to start with C++, try my [url="http://www.planetcpp.info"]tutorial[/url].

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I started with PASCAL back in the days :P

But nowadays I'd recommend Java. It's fairly self-intuitive and en excellent lead-in to C. It also cuts away the phear of pointers if you plunge straight into a C/C++ variant. Good luck with your coding.

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thanks guys
ive been trying python and i was wondering if anyone knows of of some good sights that teach you it or something
like tutorials
video tutorials are awsome

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I would say Basic, C, C#, or Python.

I tried learning C++ first and it kicked my ass.

C# is actually really easy to pick up. Actually, I know it sounds cheesy and a little embarrassing, but C# for kids and VB for Kids are actually good things to read if you start with those languages. Mainly because they make it easy to visualize the different concepts in the languages.

[url="http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/beginner/kids/default.aspx"]http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/...ds/default.aspx[/url]

That plus any of the other .net learning resources are good if you want to pick up one of the .net languages.

As far as python some good resources are actually linked to on the site.

[url="http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide"]http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide[/url]
[url="http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers"]http://wiki.python.org/moin/BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers[/url]
[url="http://docs.python.org/tut/"]http://docs.python.org/tut/[/url] Edited by Vangald

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hi,
I think C is the best choice, even if it's a bit hard, after you learn it, nothing can stop you ! you can learn any other language in no time.
why ? because almost all the languages have a lot of similarities to C, for instance : PHP , javascript, java, c#, ...
so just go for it, it worth the pain !

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[quote name='LordRach' post='304345' date='Apr 5 2008, 09:19 AM']hi,
I think C is the best choice, even if it's a bit hard, after you learn it, nothing can stop you ! you can learn any other language in no time.
why ? because almost all the languages have a lot of similarities to C, for instance : PHP , javascript, java, c#, ...
so just go for it, it worth the pain ![/quote]

Seeing how C lacks most of the features of those languages (especially object oriented features, which is really a large hurdle when you're learning), that doesn't make too much sense. Even from a low-level point of view, C has little in common with any of those. The only thing C has in common with any of them is a slight syntax likeness.

Though it is easier to learn new languages after your first, no matter what it is. The mental process of composing a program as well as many of the basic features and techniques of the language will be similar, all that's left is to learn the new syntax and features. Eventually, having learned many languages over many years, it gets to the point where learning a new language is almost as easy as looking at some code (or reading a language grammar) to learn the syntax and browse the docs to see which features the language uses.

So to reiterate my advice from long ago (why are you resurrecting a dead thread?): It doesn't really matter what you learn. Any experience will help you, even if it ends up being experience in a language it turns out you have no use for.

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lol i think i started with one of those ti-83 calculator's basic language first :roll:

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[quote name='Ohm' post='304358' date='Apr 5 2008, 10:56 AM'][quote name='LordRach' post='304345' date='Apr 5 2008, 09:19 AM']hi,
I think C is the best choice, even if it's a bit hard, after you learn it, nothing can stop you ! you can learn any other language in no time.
why ? because almost all the languages have a lot of similarities to C, for instance : PHP , javascript, java, c#, ...
so just go for it, it worth the pain ![/quote]

Seeing how C lacks most of the features of those languages (especially object oriented features, which is really a large hurdle when you're learning), that doesn't make too much sense. Even from a low-level point of view, C has little in common with any of those. The only thing C has in common with any of them is a slight syntax likeness.

Though it is easier to learn new languages after your first, no matter what it is. The mental process of composing a program as well as many of the basic features and techniques of the language will be similar, all that's left is to learn the new syntax and features. Eventually, having learned many languages over many years, it gets to the point where learning a new language is almost as easy as looking at some code (or reading a language grammar) to learn the syntax and browse the docs to see which features the language uses.

So to reiterate my advice from long ago (why are you resurrecting a dead thread?): It doesn't really matter what you learn. Any experience will help you, even if it ends up being experience in a language it turns out you have no use for.
[/quote]

I actually disagree with you there. Many, many moons ago after learning C the transission to perl was a synch. It was almost a no brainer. I'd started even many more moons ago with BASIC, which I believe now is a horrible way to start out. If you plan on being in the *nix world, I think C is a good place to start. Don't be confused with learning C with "mastering" C. I think that the understanding of C, it's syntax and other things will make the transsision to PHP, Perl, Python really easy.

Of course, if you're not looking at working on a *nix plateform, then all bets are off.

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Has anyone on this thread thought outside language syntactical model learning ?

I think its essential, more so to learn how to design data structures and algorithms;
the ability to interprete programs consisely is highly regarded, else you write code
with flawed algorithmic ideologies, creating problems for you later on in your
programming career.

I'm not sure, however, if everyone agrees with me here, oh well, here are a few books
I got earlier:

odd@fbzd:~$ ls Documents/programming/design/
Code Complete.pdf
Introduction to Algorithms.pdf linkers_and_loaders.djvu
Programming Pearls.pdf
The Practice of Programming - Kernighan & Pike.pdf
Write Great Code: Understanding the Machine Volume 1.chm
Write Great Code: Volume 2 Thinking Low Level Writing High Level.pdf

Good enough?

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Why are you digging up a 6 month old thread to show off your l33t d00d pirated b00kz collection? I think pretty much everyone who posted here has forgotten this thread even exists.

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Designing data structures and algorithms really isn't some major thing. There are two required classes in the CS program at my school, which I'm sure is similar to others, which teach it. Honestly I think the classes are a waste of time. Having a professor sit there and lecture about different types of trees, vectors, linked lists, heaps, stacks, etc. is extremely boring and in my opinion a waste of time, especially when the lab assignments are just re-implementing the same data structures over and over. Once you have a basic understanding of O notation and some good documentation it's really just minor differences and using certain data structures differently.

And I second Ohm's response...stop thread digging.

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[quote name='Ohm' post='325945' date='Dec 20 2008, 08:25 PM']Why are you digging up a 6 month old thread to show off your l33t d00d pirated b00kz collection? I think pretty much everyone who posted here has forgotten this thread even exists.[/quote]

I had no idea it was a six month thread. I was just looking over topics.
Half of those e-books were purchased, with money.

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Yeah, some people actually do buy E-books, you know. This might belong in the Retail Hacking section but I bought some E-books from an unnamed vendor online and then did a chargeback on the credit card I used because I didn't realize they weren't hard copy. Well later on, this company switched to a new client-side program for downloading purchased E-books and I got an e-mail telling me how to download the E-books I had "purchased." (similar to the QVC lady from Making Money the BlackHat Way but with virtual goods instead of physical goods.) Not something I did intentionally but it happened.

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[quote name='oddflux' post='325943' date='Dec 20 2008, 07:11 PM']Has anyone on this thread thought outside language syntactical model learning ?

I think its essential, more so to learn how to design data structures and algorithms;
the ability to interprete programs consisely is highly regarded, else you write code
with flawed algorithmic ideologies, creating problems for you later on in your
programming career.

I'm not sure, however, if everyone agrees with me here, oh well, here are a few books
I got earlier:

odd@fbzd:~$ ls Documents/programming/design/
Code Complete.pdf
Introduction to Algorithms.pdf linkers_and_loaders.djvu
Programming Pearls.pdf
The Practice of Programming - Kernighan & Pike.pdf
Write Great Code: Understanding the Machine Volume 1.chm
Write Great Code: Volume 2 Thinking Low Level Writing High Level.pdf

Good enough?[/quote]

I know you did a couple of posts in this thread I wrote oddflux. Here it seems WhatChout completely agrees with you as do I. I plan on doing just as he says and learning these very helpful things first.

[quote name='WhatChout' post='326489' date='Dec 29 2008, 10:09 AM']If you're into programming more than anything, then starting by learning a programming language is completely wrong. What you should do instead is learn about algortithms and data structures (yet again, the link in my signature) that are completely abstract, and then learn implementation by learning the syntax of a language you want to learn. By starting with any language you are limiting yourself to the paradigm preferred or sometimes enforced by the language. Since you said you're more into programming than anything, then you should learn the ability of solving problems first, not the ability of implementing solutions. You're going to be much better off then.[/quote]

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