p0d

WiFi with Debian

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Seriously WTF, I cannot get my fucking Internal Modem or Wireless card working this is really starting to piss me the fuck off. Don't even SUGGEST NDISWrapper as I don't have the driver discs. Its had me stumped for months, can anyone help me out?

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Uh, care to tell us what cards you have or anything HELPFUL?

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What's the make of your card? And yeah, you're probably going to have to use NDISWrapper. Before you spout about not having driver discs, try Googling for them. Back in the day, before Windows came with as many drivers it does now, DriverGuide was the way to go.

Forget the internal modem. It's 99% likely that it's a WinModem, and very unlikely you'll get it to work satisfactorily with Linux. I recommend a PCMCIA modem that's actually a hardware modem -- I use a US Robotics Megahertz 56k (XJ1560). These should be cheap now.

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Forget the internal modem. It's 99% likely that it's a WinModem

Winmodems are the devil's spawn.....

but this might help:

http://www.linmodems.org/

Mungewell.

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Try searching the forums about networking in Debian for WiFi.. There are quite a few threads on this already.

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What's the make of your card? And yeah, you're probably going to have to use NDISWrapper. Before you spout about not having driver discs, try Googling for them. Back in the day, before Windows came with as many drivers it does now, DriverGuide was the way to go.

Forget the internal modem. It's 99% likely that it's a WinModem, and very unlikely you'll get it to work satisfactorily with Linux. I recommend a PCMCIA modem that's actually a hardware modem -- I use a US Robotics Megahertz 56k (XJ1560). These should be cheap now.

Forget the internal modem. It's 99% likely that it's a WinModem

Winmodems are the devil's spawn.....

but this might help:

http://www.linmodems.org/

Mungewell.

Thanks, well it's a Broadcom (I'll get the model number in a bit) I believe it relies on the bc***.ko module, sorry not wealth of info at the moment.

mungewell: thanks for the link. Yes, WinModems are indeed devil spawn.

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Have your tried this:

lspci | grep Broadcom

What, if anything, was the result?

Also, if I may suggest, have you considered using Backtrack2. Nothing against Debian but BT2 is one fantastic release with lots of great toys.

brill

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Also, if I may suggest, have you considered using Backtrack2. Nothing against Debian but BT2 is one fantastic release with lots of great toys.

brill

BT2 is a live CD, so it's not too suited for use as one's regular HD-installed desktop distro. It's great for having a bunch of security tools on a pre-configured bootable CD. The security tools can cause a lot of vulnerabilities themselves, and a HD install of a live CD is quite a bit harder to maintain than an install of a regular distro.

Debian should do fine for you, it's just a matter of determining if your Broadcom card is supported by the kernel driver. I think it only supports certain Broadcom cards. Otherwise, you need to get a more Linux-compatible card, or you need to use NDISWrapper. NDISWrapper isn't all that bad -- the biggest downside is not being able to do some of the neater wireless tricks with it (even using Kismet).

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If you are willing to compile a new kernel (which you should anyway on any fresh linux install), check out getting support for the bcm43xx driver for broadcom chipsets.

http://bcm43xx.berlios.de/

edit: spelling

Edited by Alk3
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I don't know about recompiling your kernel but, I've had luck using this how to on Braodcom BCM43xx drivers

If that doesn't help try searching linuxquestion.org or ubuntuguide.com forum.

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Also, if I may suggest, have you considered using Backtrack2. Nothing against Debian but BT2 is one fantastic release with lots of great toys.

brill

BT2 is a live CD, so it's not too suited for use as one's regular HD-installed desktop distro. It's great for having a bunch of security tools on a pre-configured bootable CD. The security tools can cause a lot of vulnerabilities themselves, and a HD install of a live CD is quite a bit harder to maintain than an install of a regular distro.

That's a matter of opinion as I use it daily for my desktop distro no problem.

brill

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Also, if I may suggest, have you considered using Backtrack2. Nothing against Debian but BT2 is one fantastic release with lots of great toys.

brill

BT2 is a live CD, so it's not too suited for use as one's regular HD-installed desktop distro. It's great for having a bunch of security tools on a pre-configured bootable CD. The security tools can cause a lot of vulnerabilities themselves, and a HD install of a live CD is quite a bit harder to maintain than an install of a regular distro.

That's a matter of opinion as I use it daily for my desktop distro no problem.

brill

If I ran a vulnerability scanner against your Back Track installed hard drive, will i find anything? :D

Or do you actually keep it as secure as possible with all the latest updates?

You must be in maniac mode with that compiler of yours!

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Thanks guys, but I think I am gonna can this project in favour of a more Linux friendly card.

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