1337Noob

No internet in Ubuntu

22 posts in this topic

I am new to Linux so I decided to use Ubuntu because I heard it was noob friendly. Everything boots fine, all the games work and everything is as it should. Then you get to the internet....that is where I cannot do shit. I have googled "no internet in ubuntu" and similar queries, they say mess with the network-> connections tab. Have! Still the problem persists. I tried to figure things out with the "ifconfig" command, but that did not help. It does connect with my linskey router. And in Windows Vista I have full bars. Can someone help a young noob like me?!

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Are you using a wireless card? I'm assuming you are, which means you will most likely have to use ndiswrapper and the windows driver for the card to set it up and configure it. You can go here, to find all the information you need to setup ndiswrapper with ubuntu.

BoBo

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Yes I am using a wireless card. Thanks I'll see if that works for me.

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No internet in Ubuntu

Dude ! I need to install Ubuntu I did not know the entire internet was on that one CD !

s/Ubuntu/FreeBSD

lose the GUI learn at least how to configure and install drivers for a network card .. then you can start messing with

*nix GUI

man ifconfig

man dhclient

* do ipconfig /all > txt.txt then start txt.txt and print out that text

* look at the txt and what ifconfig -a says they should look the same - the IP number

* goto your *nix box and type ifconfig -a make sure your wifi card is even listed if it type ...

dhclient XXX ( where XXX is the nic )

* if that does not work its prob bad drivers or none at all for that nic

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Plug in your favorite color RJ-45 Connecter and go into terminal and type:

sudo ifconfig eth0 down
ifconfig eth0 up
sudo dhclient eth0

Should get your wired internet up.

As for your wireless... You can search the repositories for a wifi-manager or you can do this ( this is assuming your wifi card drivers are working but your wifi isn't associated to any AP. )

sudo iwlist scan
//[i]choose your AP[/i]
sudo ifconfig eth0 down
sudo ifconfig eth1 up
sudo iwconfig eth1 ssid <yourap> mode managed

That last line might be incorrect, im at work and i have a brain fart. haha. Good Luck

Edited by seven
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do a search for your wireless card in the tutorial section of ubuntuforums :) you can find out what it is by using PC Wizard in Vista, or running lspci in ubuntu and looking through the output.

Edited by iceni
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I tried to install ndiswrapper & that failed. Do I need to have Ubuntu installed on my hard disk is it? If I do, what is the best way to partition it? I just do not know what to do for it & how. /*Hence the reason for the name 1337NOOB!!!*/

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The best help you can get is on the ubuntu forums for that matter.

First read this Ubuntu

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Do I need to have Ubuntu installed on my hard disk is it?

Wait, you haven't installed it?

"Well there's your problem!"

It should be pretty easy to partition and stuff, it /does/ after all have a wizard.

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Just chucking in my two cents:

I would check that the NIC in your machine is suported by ubuntu. First of all check which kernel modules are loaded using 'sudo lsmod' and see if one needed by your NIC is in that list. If it isn't supported then just get a card which uses the Prism2 chipset (Linux supports these.)

To associate with your access point (Assuming your not using WEP or WPA, issue the following command.)

'iwconfig eth0 essid your_ap mode managed'

Also, check that the IP address (by running 'ifconfig') and the default gateway (by running the 'route' command) to see if they are set up correctly. This would depend on whether IP addresses and default gateway are assigned by DHCP on your LAN or if they have to be entered manually.

Off the top of my head, to assign an ip address manualy to an interface in linux, you use a command like this (Assuming your NIC has the interface name eth0)

ifconfig eth0 192.168.0.1 up

and your default gateway can be set up using this command. (In this example, the default gateway, or router address is 192.168.0.2 and your NIC is on eth0)

route add default gw 192.168.0.2 eth0

If you don't have dhcp, you will also need to set up your DNS servers. Lets assume your router handles DNS requests. Edit /etc/resolv.conf and add the following line

nameserver 192.168.0.2

Then just save the file. No reboot is needed.

Hope this helps, m8.

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the best way to partition it? its really personal, what you do with the computer in question. i have a desktop and a laptop so i decided that i am going to delete windows, all i need is a safe internet computer, if you use the computer as your main computer and you want to keep windows. think of what you want ubuntu to do and what you are doing with windows if you need windows for games and say microsoft office make the windows space larger than Ubuntu one. there is no best way to do it just don't forget we are talking about whole OS's neither of them want to be to, to cramped (and windows just plain needs a lot of space to work well.)

hgot damn i make a lot of spelling errors! :boldgreen:

Edited by Bino Panda
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lspci -v | grep Broadcom

Run that. If you have broadcom wireless that will help us help you. Oh hell if you knew what the chipset was.

Did you seriously google 'no internet in ubuntu'? Hell at least you did google I guess.

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Okay first thing first. Do You Have A laptop? if so follow my steps. well if you like ubuntu you will like backtrack, here is the download for it. It is a live cd no need to install unless you want to.

http://www.remote-exploit.org/backtrack_download.html Now when you have burned the .iso to a cd just insert the cd restart windows with the cd inserted. When you see the, Press any key to boot from cd.... Then just press enter a few times or something, Then when it comes up with a black screen type in the following, bt nopcmcia , what this does is boots "bt" or "backtrack" without pcmcia components and will fix your internet problem. Then when it finnaly loads the login and password are by default. Login:root , Password:toor , then once logged in as root type , startx , this will load the backtrack with a "GUI", or "Graphical User Interface". and thats it go to the menu and find Kwifi and that will help you connect to your internet. Hope this helps.

tsig:A.K.A>TheSignature

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Okay first thing first. Do You Have A laptop? if so follow my steps. well if you like ubuntu you will like backtrack, here is the download for it. It is a live cd no need to install unless you want to.

http://www.remote-exploit.org/backtrack_download.html Now when you have burned the .iso to a cd just insert the cd restart windows with the cd inserted. When you see the, Press any key to boot from cd.... Then just press enter a few times or something, Then when it comes up with a black screen type in the following, bt nopcmcia , what this does is boots "bt" or "backtrack" without pcmcia components and will fix your internet problem. Then when it finnaly loads the login and password are by default. Login:root , Password:toor , then once logged in as root type , startx , this will load the backtrack with a "GUI", or "Graphical User Interface". and thats it go to the menu and find Kwifi and that will help you connect to your internet. Hope this helps.

tsig:A.K.A>TheSignature

I find this post very obnoxious...probably the font and plethora of grammatical errors. I don't think that BT2 would be the best choice since he clearly explains that he is a newbie to linux.

But yes...I think that you should stick with Ubuntu since it will help with the conversion from XP to Linux. First try to install Feisty Fawn 7.04. It is pretty good at recognizing hardware. If it still doesnt work... google your laptop or desktop and find out what kind of wireless card you have and if you can what chipset.

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LSPCI will tell you what you have. It will save you time and you wont have to spend a few hours googeling your laptop/desktop model.

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Dont bother with BackTrack. You can have all the same tools on any Linux distro. All it requres is a quick install on most systems. Go with Ubuntu and follow the guides on the Ubuntu community documentation. Those docs cover mostly everything you need to know in Ubuntu. If you dont find it there, the Ubuntu forums has a plethora of tutorials. I am positive you will find your answers at one or the other (if not both).

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When you do install ubuntu, uncomment your repositories and try

sudo aptitude install wifi-radar

after it installs, type wifi-radar in terminal

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When you do install ubuntu, uncomment your repositories and try

sudo aptitude install wifi-radar

after it installs, type wifi-radar in terminal

That wont work if you dont have a supported wireless card. You HAVE to make sure it is natively supported and if it isnt, you need to compile the module to enable it.

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Woops, sry hah. lspci and find out your card and if it is supported. Shouldnt take too long to do that. If that doesnt work and you can't get ndswrapper to work, go out and buy a pcmcia slot card. Im using netgear wg511t and it works for packet injections if that is what you are looking forward to in the future.

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I think I have a similar problem. To be specific, I am equally newbish at Linux, my laptop, HP Compaq Presario C500, has a "Broadcom Corporation Dell Wireless 1390 WLAN Mini-PCI Card", and the card always shows up as disabled. When I try to enable it, it is disabled immediately after. Looking through a small lid on the back of my laptop, I see a small card with a square chip that says "Broadcom" on it, so I assume that is the wireless card; there are two wires connected to discrete terminals on the card, one white and one black, I assume those go to the little light behind the "wireless" button that's on the other side of the power button from the mute button.

I was trying to fix this problem for a while now. I tried some different Linux distros, (Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Knoppix, Debian, Mandriva, and I failed at installing Vector.) neither worked with this WLAN card. According to Mandriva, the problem is with the firmware or drivers. From what I remember from the Broadcom site, they don't have linux drivers for that card. I currently have Kubuntu and I plan on keeping it.

Now, I know that soon I'm going to need wireless networking one way or another. If I am unable to fix the problem on the software scale, I will just have to try the hardware scale; I may go as far as buying a USB wifi adapter or replacing the wlan card with a more compatible one. (As long as it does not involve a PC-Card, my laptop doesn't have a slot for that.) I would appreciate information on any setup that may involve Mini-PCI cards, USB adapters, and any free software that may make it work. However, I would especially appreciate a solution that doesn't cost anything.

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