intimidat0r

Estimating pi by throwing things at parallel lines

19 posts in this topic

Nope. :D I haven't reached the point in school where they tell me what the curvy S things mean yet.

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Does anybody want to verify the maths for me? I have not quite made it to calculus yet.

You mean you want someone to verify that the maths on this page is correct?

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A wolfram link is almost guaranteed to be 100% correct.

Oh and that "curvy S" is bounds, the expression on the top being the upper bounds, the expression on the bottom being the lower bounds

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lol... curvy 'S' is an integral. In order to understand how to integrate, you must first know how to derive. Good luck on how your understanding of this problem.

I can follow up to step 12, where they start adding little half-circles over theta. What do they mean?

What do these var() and avar() function mean? variation (delta?) and absolute variation?

Edited by Aghaster
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Ah, I think I was...kind of right? anyway Aghaster knows more than I apparently

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The girl I'm dating is a math major on her senior year, and says the math they give /does/ work out. She's also fairly impressed, as that approximation wasn't covered in the book she's currently reading concerning the history of Pi.

MathWorld is almost always accurate...I've used them in several classes where professor's help wasn't enough to learn a concept on.

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lol... curvy 'S' is an integral. In order to understand how to integrate, you must first know how to derive. Good luck on how your understanding of this problem.

I can follow up to step 12, where they start adding little half-circles over theta. What do they mean?

From what I can tell, the small half circles indicate an estimated value. There is a half-circle above the theta as well as Pi in a couple of places down the page.

What do these var() and avar() function mean? variation (delta?) and absolute variation?

Variance, here (var()), I guess, is the measure of the amount of incorrectness in the experiment's ability to estimate Pi. Avar() is asymptotic variance, and I have absolutely no idea what that is, but I think it has something to do with the fact that the variance drops a little bit with every needle thrown at the parallel lines, approaching an asymptote. It's way too late for calculus :), and it's been too many years since I took it. Yikes.

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wow, your all clever guys, good at maths, this has probrably been asked before, but i think that we should start a new project, and that would consist of a sub-forum for maths, and then have different threads for different areas of math, including:algebra, probrability, trig etc etc...... im still fairly new binrev, so i dont know if this has been asked before, but i know that maths is often very closely related to computers, etc...

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lol... curvy 'S' is an integral. In order to understand how to integrate, you must first know how to derive. Good luck on how your understanding of this problem.

I figured out simple derivation (the f'(x)=(f(x+h)-f(x))/h stuff) from Wikipedia. Do you know of any good learning links? When I read the Wikipedia article on integrals I felt like I was missing something.

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When I read the Wikipedia article on integrals I felt like I was missing something.

Integration is not as simple as differentiation namely due to the lack of a chain-rule analogue. Even worse, many functions can't even be integrated as a composition of elementary functions.

I'd suggest some freshman calculus book if you're just starting out, but it really depends how in-depth you want to get.

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Don't get a freshman book - calc is a lot easier than schools and textbooks make it out to be.

You could start here or, better yet, here.

IMHO, it makes more sense to read up on integrals before jumping into calc. But it seems you've already done that.

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Don't get a freshman book - calc is a lot easier than schools and textbooks make it out to be.

You could start here or, better yet, here.

IMHO, it makes more sense to read up on integrals before jumping into calc. But it seems you've already done that.

I've never studied calc... but from what little I've seen it looks like that anyone who can program a computer can get a grasp on it pretty quickly... is this a correct assumption?

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Don't get a freshman book - calc is a lot easier than schools and textbooks make it out to be.

I suggested a freshman book because they typically lack rigor and focus on computations, which makes it *easier* than it should be.

IMHO, it makes more sense to read up on integrals before jumping into calc.

Since when were integrals not a part of calculus?

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Alright, thanks guys.

By freshman book, I assume you meant for college students? I'm a freshman in highschool, about to graduate Algebra II honors. Then next year's pre-calculus.

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I suggested a freshman book because they typically lack rigor and focus on computations, which makes it *easier* than it should be.

*Shrugs*

It seems to me that anything laced with horrible writing and hate for passion (aka textbooks) make the learning process less enjoyable and, thus, more difficult.

Since when were integrals not a part of calculus?

I didn't suggest they weren't.

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Why do people use the word 'maths'? It's just math, or if you prefer, mathematics.

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