ntheory

Sabayon Linux

21 posts in this topic

I've been playing with Sabayon Linux for a few days (I have had the ISO forever but never bothered to install it). I have to say it's a slick little distro. It has detected everything I've thrown at it including weird USB bluetooth dongles that don't even work in Windows. Check it out. It comes with XGL/AIGLX acceleration out of the box and runs KDE with Beryl to make everything look cool (but, of course, it wastes CPU cycles for glitz). Naturally you can turn all of that nonsense off though.

Sabayon

BTW, it's based on Gentoo. iPod. Asterisk.

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I've had the ISO downloaded for a while now .. just never got to trying it out. I think maybe I will do that today and see what happens :D

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Why would someone use this over vanilla gentoo?

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I've installed Gentoo around a dozen times, but I'm too impatient to compile everything by source.

Never tried Sabayon. Remind me the next time my hormones start raging and I have to install another distro.

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If you aren't going to install from source what is the point in using a derivative of gentoo? You might as well use a good distro.

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Why would someone use this over vanilla gentoo?

No need to fiddle with any configuration files. Then, once the system is booted, you can start emerging anything you want. I think the word that I'm looking for is "convenience". :D

Also, the new Gentoo installer sucks. I had my first experience with it today and it crashed so many times I was ready to smash my machine. The old way was time consuming but at least it actually worked. In the end the problem really was that after the system was fdisked it couldn't read the partition table. Unfortunately it never said that and just crashed. When I did it from the command-line it told me to reboot. After rebooting everything went fine until it emerged grub, then it just hung. All in all the experience was awful.

Sabayon has problems too but it was nice to get started straight away and have a bunch of apps to play with. Overall I'm pretty impressed with KDE despite its CPU and RAM hungry tendencies.

For my server(s) vanilla Gentoo Linux is the only way to fly. For my desktop I'm looking for a way around the bullshit and this appears to be it.

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I toyed with Sabayon for a little while. In my opinion, it is far to bloated. It all the apps I will ever need and all the apps I will never use! I am actually using the Protech beta and am pretty happy with it! Anyone else here use it? Check it out here:

http://www.techm4sters.org/

I even think it's better than BackTrack, but thats just me :P

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If you aren't going to install from source what is the point in using a derivative of gentoo? You might as well use a good distro.

Thank you!

There was this guy at the 2600 meeting that had done a hard drive install of Sabayon and didnt even know what to do with it. This is a great idea for Gentoo to add more users to the user base of Gentoo. The problem is it isnt compiled from source, taking away the whole point of using Gentoo. Most Gentoo users that I have talked to always are talking about optimization from compiling from source... that way your whole OS is completely optimized for your laptop/PC...

I did like the interface and the fact that it was packed FULL of all types of applications. Also that it had Beryl already installed. Thing is that you might as well do a full install of Slackware or Debian if you are not going to compile Gentoo or a derivative from source.

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I like Gentoo because the package system compiles from source. Why? It's certainly not because I think that my system will be super optimized for speed because I set a few compiler flags... it's because I can use the USE flags to remove the junk I don't want (ie. X on a server, etc).

The fact of the matter is that I have yet to see some real numbers that show me how much faster Gentoo is because of some fancy flag hacking. Does anyone have real data on this?

BTW, emerge is still there obviously. There's nothing stopping you from compiling new stuff (or even recompiling old stuff) however you'd like. Again, it just solves the initial configuration issues for you.

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ntheory it's about 0.0000001% increase I compiled a whole system myself and I don't see any speed increase at all when optimized for a p4.

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That's what I figured. If I was going to build some kind of cluster that was severely computation intensive I'd optimize the hell out of it and it'd probably make a difference if it was always busy. As it is there are so many idle CPU cycles on my desktop machine though that it doesn't really matter if I can give it some more. :P

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There was this guy at the 2600 meeting that had done a hard drive install of Sabayon and didnt even know what to do with it.

There was kid at the last 2600 that had Sabayon installed as well

Edited by BigBrother
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I used the Sabayon live boot ISO a few weeks ago, it's got some nice eye candy with Beryl / KDE.

It was fun to play around with, the only reason I used it was to play with Beryl because I didn't

want to install it on my current distro. Anyone just looking for some easy set up eye candy in linux,

go for it. I'm happy with my current distro though.

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In my opinion, it is far to bloated. It all the apps I will ever need and all the apps I will never use!

I hope I'm not alone, but I actually like bloat. I have tons of programs on my computer that I don't use, but thats ok because I have a 40 gig harddrive, and thats less that most people I know. Plus programs on linux seem to take up very little space. Package managers make it really enticing to bloat up your system to try out all this software you can get free with a couple clicks/commands, and I do just that. I've found some pretty cool stuff just by installing something that sounded kinda cool in the package manager description. Sure, my system is bloated, but I like it that way.

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If you aren't going to install from source what is the point in using a derivative of gentoo? You might as well use a good distro.

For a seasoned nix user I agree %100 but for a person just starting out with Linux it's a great way to go.

It's a way fat install taking up way to much disk space but it does give the nix noob dang near every piece of available open source software and in the process show them that there is a viable option to using windows. For that reason alone I think that Sabayon has served it's purpose very well.

Plus the default colors in the version that I had installed on this box where so friigin' ugly (boot screens, menu buttons, everything) it forced me to figure out out to alter them which was another very good learning experience:o)

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Why would someone use this over vanilla gentoo?

No need to fiddle with any configuration files. Then, once the system is booted, you can start emerging anything you want. I think the word that I'm looking for is "convenience". :D

Also, the new Gentoo installer sucks. I had my first experience with it today and it crashed so many times I was ready to smash my machine. The old way was time consuming but at least it actually worked. In the end the problem really was that after the system was fdisked it couldn't read the partition table. Unfortunately it never said that and just crashed. When I did it from the command-line it told me to reboot. After rebooting everything went fine until it emerged grub, then it just hung. All in all the experience was awful.

Sabayon has problems too but it was nice to get started straight away and have a bunch of apps to play with. Overall I'm pretty impressed with KDE despite its CPU and RAM hungry tendencies.

For my server(s) vanilla Gentoo Linux is the only way to fly. For my desktop I'm looking for a way around the bullshit and this appears to be it.

just got it... surprised to see it work on one of my 'older' boxes...

"Sabayon is an Italian dessert made with egg yolks, sugar, a sweet liquor (usually Marsala wine), and sometimes cream or whole eggs. It is a very light custard, which has been whipped to incorporate a large amount of air."

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If you want, you can compile the whole system new, optimizing what you want, leaving the rest. In essence, though, you have a very complete system, with pretty sane optimizations. It has current software, lots of pretty eye-candy and is stable. Within a half an hour, you have a usable system without having to hunt down any multimedia codecs, newer versions of software, compile them etc. I feel comfortable with the idea of bringing even a beta version of the software home and slapping it on my hard drive, without having to update it because of any "Show-Stoppers".

I've also compiled a whole system from stage1 for a p4, but it actually turned out to be slower than a default Debian Sarge installation, which pretty much runs on anything that's x86 compatible.

In the end, Sabayon gives you all the opportunities to tweak everything, compile and optimize what you want, with the advantage of having a functional system for a lot of different configurations installed from the get-go. If you're not happy with anything unless it's done "your way", well, you can always put together a BLFS system or... if you can compromise that teensy-weentsy bit, GoboLinux (Fast, small and LFS-based with multimedia to boot).

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I used the Sabayon live boot ISO a few weeks ago, it's got some nice eye candy with Beryl / KDE.

It was fun to play around with, the only reason I used it was to play with Beryl because I didn't

want to install it on my current distro. Anyone just looking for some easy set up eye candy in linux,

go for it. I'm happy with my current distro though.

Fat distros need love too.

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I used the Sabayon live boot ISO a few weeks ago, it's got some nice eye candy with Beryl / KDE.

It was fun to play around with, the only reason I used it was to play with Beryl because I didn't

want to install it on my current distro. Anyone just looking for some easy set up eye candy in linux,

go for it. I'm happy with my current distro though.

Fat distros need love too.

Maybe, but damn, even the website looks bloated as hell.

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I just booted into Sabayon and I'm very impressed with what comes with it and how beryl works straight out of the box. My video card is an NVidia 8800 and usually it's hard to find anything that has those drivers preinstalled.

This distro is amazing. Although I prefer gnome to KDE, this is still pretty crazy awesome. I know you can switch to gnome after install, but I'm just booted live right now.

Very satisfied with Sabayon. :)

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