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Samodelkin

Windows Genuine Advantage

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Just curious, does anyone know what the Windows Genuine Advantage thing will do if it finds an illegitimate copy of Windows XP? I mean, the description says it helps the user acquire a genuine copy of Windows XP, but how? How exactly does it convince the user to get a genuine copy of Windows XP if the user is satisfied with the illegitimate copy? Does it become malicious or hold the computer hostage or what? :grr:

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It's nagware. It puts a popup on the logon screen that won't dissapear for thirty seconds, and prevent you from logging on.

Then when you finally /do/ logon, there's a balloon popup on the taskbar that will remind you every few minutes that your

copy of XP ain't legit.

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When you say it prevents you from logging on, do you means it tries to stop you permanently? My friend had a comp I was trying to fix and his log on screen had the WGA notification and he couldn't log on. I just thought he'd forgotten his password.

Was it the WGA blocking us instead? He password may of been correct after all?

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When you say it prevents you from logging on, do you means it tries to stop you permanently? My friend had a comp I was trying to fix and his log on screen had the WGA notification and he couldn't log on. I just thought he'd forgotten his password.

Was it the WGA blocking us instead? He password may of been correct after all?

No I just mean that for thirty seconds of the logon screen, you have a popup that informs you that your version of Windows isn't genuine. Once that's gone, Windows should still operate normally - ie. let you log on.

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I got one awhile back. Run HijackThis and that will get rid of it.

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Just curious, does anyone know what the Windows Genuine Advantage thing will do if it finds an illegitimate copy of Windows XP? I mean, the description says it helps the user acquire a genuine copy of Windows XP, but how? How exactly does it convince the user to get a genuine copy of Windows XP if the user is satisfied with the illegitimate copy? Does it become malicious or hold the computer hostage or what? :grr:

There really isn't a way (beside auth code verification) to determine whether or not a properly cracked copy would be good or bad. However I advise, even if your copy of windows is legit microsoft loves data mining. There are WAY better tools out there (like firefox instead of IE) that don't require this WGA crap.

However I have heard of software that is *apparently* perfectly legal that if it detects any modification or a lack of data to match to a database of serials and names it basically wipes your hard drive. As far as I know they can and will get away with it too. So be weary with your warez. Another piece of software authentication is used in WindowsBlinds. Essentially if it detects a cracked version, I assume by the same auth code to name database system, the skins it puts over your Windows GUI become pitch black and unusable.

However you can clearly see the repercussions in using such malicious, and down right wrong copy prevention techniques. Granted it stops all but the most determined pirates from cracking your software, what if a legit customer is affected? What happens if the customer comes under assault by say a virus and needs to reinstall his Windows? When he attempts to get his auth code again it may (we're talking like a 30% chance) return false and destroy his GUI, or wipe his drive. That was actually a problem with the software that wiped your drive if it sensed it was cracked. Legitimate customers were becoming effected by this.

Borderline: Don't trust WGA. Ever.

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If you want to get rid of WGA PM me. :pirate:

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I got one awhile back. Run HijackThis and that will get rid of it.

And there's a patch binary out there that's a few KB in size that works as well.

If you google "WGA patch", you'll find it.

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WPA = deactive your windows and locks you out if windows is not activated within 30 days ; required to run windows longterm

WGA = annoys you, no deactivation ; required to use windows update through the retail site, not required for the corporate site :D

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WPA = deactive your windows and locks you out if windows is not activated within 30 days ; required to run windows longterm

Hmmm... My Windows Vista laptop, I never did the activation on it. So far, the Vista operating system on it offered less functionality, a lot less less compatibility, and a bit more bugs than XP on my desktop. Can I still somehow get the refund for the Vista if I never activated it?

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I don't think M$ would go for that.

Maybe sell it to a friend?

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WPA = deactive your windows and locks you out if windows is not activated within 30 days ; required to run windows longterm

Hmmm... My Windows Vista laptop, I never did the activation on it. So far, the Vista operating system on it offered less functionality, a lot less less compatibility, and a bit more bugs than XP on my desktop. Can I still somehow get the refund for the Vista if I never activated it?

Officially, once you click the 'i accept' at the end of the long eula that appears during first install/first startup any hopes of a refund are void.

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WPA = deactive your windows and locks you out if windows is not activated within 30 days ; required to run windows longterm

Hmmm... My Windows Vista laptop, I never did the activation on it. So far, the Vista operating system on it offered less functionality, a lot less less compatibility, and a bit more bugs than XP on my desktop. Can I still somehow get the refund for the Vista if I never activated it?

Officially, once you click the 'i accept' at the end of the long eula that appears during first install/first startup any hopes of a refund are void.

Well the one thing everyone so far left out is that Microsoft uses WGA to inform the people who don't know they have illegal software. ( Yea it does everything else as well ) But the success of WGA relies on the consumer being honest and that is what MS preaches when they talk about it. According to their study a decent percent of people using illegal copies of Windows are unaware, so they hope that by informing the user that it's illegal they will use the provided resources to buy a legal key. *helping the person buy the key is how it convinces the user to go legit* With that said it would not make much sense for MS to use malicous tactics to control your OS if it is legit otherwise they would be spitting in their customers faces by saying one minute that it will provide them the oppurtunity to purchase a key and gives them the benefit of the doubt while the next locking them out of their data (then again they made vista...... :P i had to poke fun at vista at least once). Basically they don't do anything but inform the user and provide a way to pay for a legal version, oh and they don't let you download updates.

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Possibly still in effect, but they used to have a policy that if you had an 'illegal' key you can apply for a (heavily discounted/free) legitimate key on the condition you have to turnover on whomever sold you the pirated key in the first place. I believe it was mainly meant to apply to oem hardware installs and not so much retail XP purchases, might still work for Vista as well.

As far as spitting in customers faces, M$ admits that a good number of detections are 'false positives' and WGA was simply put in place to annoy home users and casual pirates into at least thinking about purchasing an xp license.

Commercial users and heavier users have authentic VLK keys (legally obtained or otherwise), run their updates off a local Update server and do not have to worry about WGA or WPA; they were all put in place to screw with the home consumer. (Not that I blame Microsoft in the least, alienating the corporate world is a big no no, annoying home users into buying a license is just a good business sense).

I think a good number of companies will never rollout Vista as the standard platform opting to remain with the by now stable XP rollouts from a few years back, and simply issue sole licenses to the developers for supporting home customers who were stupid enough to 'upgrade'. Again though, with Vista the corporations have a local Activation server to validate licenses with for large rollouts, never having to go near Microsoft - you can setup the Activation server on the same box as your Update server so it is simply another service in a long list, which they (we? ;)) are happy to do. Home users on the other hand not quite so lucky. {Nothing stopping home users from running their own Activation server or setting the Vista Activation timer to reset continually I guess, though anybody currently running Vista at home isn't likely the sharpest of tools}

Edited by jabzor
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I just installed XP for the first time last week (been using a 500Mhz running 98 and then 2000 for most of the last decade) and it asked me if I wanted to install windows 'genuine advantage'. When I read what it actually does I lol-ed and ticked the 'f***-off and don't bother me with this lame crap again' box.

I really can't see any 'genuine advantage' to installing this software.... except maybe to M$. :blink:

If you've installed it by accident I guess you could try a system restore and then change your software updates settings to 'download but don't automatically install' and then pick and choose what you actually want to install. It will let you mark things to ignore.

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